• Unit 1:  Foundations of World History: Eras 1-3, Beginnings to 300 C.E.
    This foundational unit encompasses several key changes in human history until 300 C.E. The unit focuses on the development of Homo Sapiens, hunter gatherer societies, pastoral nomad, ancient civilizations and classic civilizations. Three major and significant changes occurred during the first era of human history: (1) the physical development of human beings, (2) the human populating of most major regions of the earth and (3) the Agricultural Revolution.  World historians frame this early period to highlight the ways human beings adapted physically and then culturally to a wide variety of environments.  Thus, the era provides a rich opportunity to investigate the populating of the earth by humans; to consider the various geographic and climatic environments where early humans survived and flourished; to examine the challenges Paleolithic peoples faced and how they developed cultural responses to those challenges; and to compare the similarities and differences of these early social organizations.
     
    Unit 2:  Era 4 - Expanding and Intensified Hemispheric Interactions,
    300 to 1500 C.E.

    Historians see a number of significant developments in this era: (1) the clustering of human population into large empires, such as the growth of the Chinese, Mongol and Islamic Empires and empires in Africa; (2) the development of trade routes (land and sea) that increased cultural and commercial exchanges in Afro-Eurasia; (3) continued consolidation and spread of major religions; and (4) empire building in the Americas, particularly the rise of the Mayan, Aztec, and Incan empires.

     

    Unit 3:  Era 5 - The Emergence of the First Global Age,

    15th - 18th Centuries

    Essentially, historians see five significant developments during this era: (1) growth of trans-oceanic contact by all major regions leading to global transformations; (2) expansion and consolidation of Eurasian empires - “gunpowder empires” – that unified large areas of Afro-Eurasia; (3) growth of new European state system and Atlantic-based economy; (4) the development of the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment in Europe and the diffusion of their ideas to other parts of the world; and (5) the increase of Europe’s political and economic power in relation to the rest of the world.

    Unit 4:  Era 6 - An Age of Global Revolutions

    18th Century to 1914

    The time period from the 18th Century to 1914 can be characterized as an age of global revolutions.  Dramatic changes in relations within and between nations were the source of major political upheavals. Simultaneously, changes in the means of production transformed the world both economically and politically. Thus, this era sees the emergence of new forms of liberal, constitutional governments, the development of new economic relationships, and the intensification of inter-regional and global interactions.  One way to make sense of the era is to focus on three interrelated, world-wide events: political revolution, industrial revolution, and the growth of European influence over most of the world.  While traditionally historians have viewed these events almost exclusively from a European perspective, world historians now view these events as having global impact.

    Unit 5: The Emergence of the First Global Age
    Essentially, historians see five significant developments during this era: (1) growth of trans-oceanic contact by all major regions leading to global transformations; (2) expansion and consolidation of Eurasian empires - “gunpowder empires” – that unified large areas of Afro-Eurasia; (3) growth of new European state system and Atlantic-based economy; (4) the development of the Scientific Revolution and the Enlightenment in Europe and the diffusion of their ideas to other parts of the world; and (5) the increase of Europe’s political and economic power in relation to the rest of the world.
     
    Unit 6:  Era 8 - The Cold War and its Aftermath: The 20th Century Since 1945
    This era opens with the world in a very desperate condition.  Over 70 million people had been killed in the two world wars, countless other millions died because of disease and poverty generated by depression and the residue of war.  Europe, Asia, and much of North Africa were mired in war-related destruction.  With Europe in crisis, many of its former colonies were fostering independence movements.  The United States emerged from World War II as the major industrial power and, for a brief time, the only atomic power.  As one of the Allied Powers from World War II, the Soviet Union occupied Eastern Europe and the eastern portion of Germany at the war’s end.  Very quickly, however, the Soviet Union and the United States became enemies. These two rivals engaged in an ideological conflict called the “Cold War.”  As economic and political tensions mounted, this war became “hot” as the two superpowers engaged in proxy conflicts. 
     
    Unit 7:  Contemporary Global Issues, Past to Present

    The contemporary world is more interconnected than at any time in history as goods, ideas, and culture travel easily and at times instantaneously – a process called globalization.  The growth and production of goods is unprecedented, as is the growth of the population and wealth of the world. However, production, population, and wealth are not equally distributed.  The results of these inequalities present challenges including global terrorism, economic inequality, environmental issues, and nationalistic conflicts.  This unit focuses on these contemporary trends, events and forces, and their historical context.

Last Modified on February 14, 2018