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    Unit 4: How Do I Get Along With Others?

     

    Overarching Question: 
     
    How do we help each other get what we need?
     
    Previous Unit: 
     
     How Do I Get What
     I Need  and Want?
    This Unit:
     
    How Do I Get Along With Others?
    Next Unit:
     
    First Grade


     Big Picture Graphic

    Questions to Focus Assessment and Instruction:
    1. Why can't I do whatever I want?
    2. Why are responsibility and fairness important in getting along with others?
    3. How do people solve problems?
    Types of Thinking: 
     
    Compare/contrast
    Analyzing Data
    Generating hypothesis 
    Non-Linguistic Representations
     

     

     

    Unit Abstract (may include Historical Overview): This culminating unit lays a foundation for civics in subsequent grades, especially regarding concepts relating to citizenship. The unit reinforces the idea that children are a part of many different groups making it very important that they learn to get along with others. Students expand on their understanding of the concept of responsibility by reviewing a class book they wrote in a prior unit. The next lesson focuses fairness as students explore why it is important to be fair. Students focus on working together to solve classroom problems by applying a problem solving method. An all day kindergarten option focuses on civic involvement and involves students designing and carrying out a simple school-based project aimed at improving the environment.

     

     
     

    Focus Questions:

    1. Why can’t I do whatever I want?

    2. Why are responsibility and fairness important in getting along with others?

    3. How do people solve problems?
     
    Content Expectations:
    K - C2.0.2: Explain why people do not have the right to do whatever they want (e.g., to promote fairness, ensure the common good, maintain safety).
     
    K - C2.0.3: Describe fair ways for groups to make decisions.

     

    K - C5.0.1: Describe situations in which they demonstrated self-discipline and individual responsibility (e.g., caring for a pet, completing chores, following school rules, working in a group, taking turns).
     

    K - P3.1.1: Identify classroom issues.

     

    K - P3.1.2: Use simple graphs to explain information about a classroom issue.

     

    K - P3.1.3: Compare their viewpoint about a classroom issue with the viewpoint of another person.

    K - P3.3.1: Express a position on a classroom issue.

     

    K - P4.2.1: Develop and implement an action plan to address or inform others about a public issue.
     
    K - P4.2.2: Participate in projects to help or inform others.
     

    Integrated GLCE’s

    S.DS.00.01: Engage in substantive conversations, remaining focused on subject matter, with interchanges beginning to build on prior responses in literature discussions, paired conversations, or other interactions. (English Language Arts)

     

    N.ME.00.03:  Compare and order numbers to 30 using phrases such as “more than” or “less than.” (Math)

     
    Key Concepts:
     
    citizenship
    common good

    fairness

    problem solving

    responsibility

    rights
     
    I Can Statements:
     
    1.  I can tell and understand why I can't do whatever I want.
     
    2.  I can show others why it is important to be fair and responsible to get along with others.
     
    3.  I can help others to solve problems.

     

    Lesson Sequence:

     

    Lesson 1: Getting Along with Others

    Lesson 2: Being Responsible

    Lesson 3: Being Fair

    Lesson 4: Talking About Problems

    Lesson 5: Working Together to Solve Problems

    Lesson 6: Making a Difference

     

     

     

     

    Resources:

    Equipment/Manipulative

    Art Paper and Drawing Materials Such as Markers and Crayons

    Chart Paper and Markers

    Overhead Projector or Document Camera and Projector
     
    Student Resources:
     
    Dixon, Annabelle. Joe's Car. Mankato, MN: Picture Window Books, 2004.
     
    Hamilton, Tisha.  Play Fair, Have Fun: A Book About Making Good Choices. Reader's Digest, 2007.
     
    Mollel, Tololwa. Ananse's Feast: An Ashanti Tale.  Clarion Books, 1997.
     
    Rose, Gill & Archbold, Tim. William and the Guinea Pig:  A Book About Responsibility (Making Good Choices).  Mankata, MN: Picture Window Books, 2004.
     
    Rowe, Don. The Sand Box (Making Good Choices). Mankato, MN: Picture Window Books, 2005.
     

     

     

    Teacher Resources:
     
    Jolson Leber, Nancy. Easy Activities for Building Social Skills: Dozens of Effective Classroom Strategies and Activities to Teach Cooperation and Communication, Manners and Respect, Positive Behavior and More!  (PreK-1). Scholastic Teaching Resources, 2002
     
    Lalli, Judy. I Like Being Me: Poems for Children About Feeling Special, Appreciating Others, and Getting Along.  Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing, 2007.
     
    Meiners, Cheri. Talk and Work it Out. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing, 2005.
     

     

    Resources for Further Professional Knowledge:

     

    Carol Hurst's Children's Literature Site. 26 August 2008 <http://www.carolhurst.com/>.
     

     

     

    Early Childhood Social Studies. 26 August 2008 <http://patricia_f.tripod.com/ssmotor.html.
     

     

     

    National Council for the Social Studies. 26 August 2008 <http://www.ncss.org/>.
     

     

     

    Social Studies for Early Childhood and Elementary School Children: A Report from NCSS Task Force on Early Childhood/Elementary Social Studies. 26 August 2008
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    Social Studies Lesson Plans and Resources. 26 August 2008 <http://www.csun.edu/~hcedu013/>.
     

     

     

    Strategies for Teaching Social Studies. 26 August 2008

     

     

     

     

    Teaching Social Studies. 26 August 2008 <http://www.proteacher.org/c/185_Teaching_Social_Studies.html. >

     

     

      

     

     

    Lesson 1: Getting Along with Others
     
    Lesson 1 Supplemental Materials:
     

     

    Content Expectations:

     

    K - C2.0.2: Explain why people do not have the right to do whatever they want (e.g., to promote fairness, ensure the common good, maintain safety.)

     

     

    Key Concepts: responsibility, rights

     

    Abstract: This lesson begins with the teacher reviewing the concept of needs and wants. The teacher explains that people have a lot of goods they want, and a lot of things they want to do. The teacher gives an example of something they would rather be doing like shopping or swimming. The teacher asks students, why can’t I go do that right now? Students share responses and the teacher guides the students in understanding that people do not have the right to do whatever they want. Adding to student ideas the teacher adds: A Teacher has the responsibility to stay at school and can’t leave students alone in the classroom because it wouldn’t be safe. The teacher then shares brief scenarios with the students. An example of a scenario would be: Bobby and his little brother are playing outside. Their mother brings out a plate of Bobby’s favorite cookies for them to share. After the mother leaves, Bobby grabs and eats all the cookies because they are his favorite. Does he have the right to do this? Following the discussion of each scenario the teacher guides students in concluding that people don’t have the right to do whatever they want. They have to consider the rights of others. The teacher brings out the chart labeled, “How to Get Along With Others” which was created in Lesson 5 of Unit 1. After reading the chart out loud the class reflects on the following questions: How well did we follow our suggestions for getting along with others this year? What could we add to the chart now? Do you think this will still be important when you are a first grader next year?

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Lesson 2: Being Responsible
     
    Lesson 2 Supplemental Materials:
     

     

    Content Expectations:

    K - C5.0.1: Describe situations in which they demonstrated self-discipline and individual responsibility (e.g., caring for a pet, completing chores, following school rules, working in a group, taking turns).

    K - P3.1.2: Use simple graphs to explain information about a classroom issue.

    N.ME.00.03: Compare and order numbers to 30 using phrases such as “more than” or “less than.” (Math)

     

    Key Concepts: responsibility

     

    Abstract: Writing the term ‘responsibility’ on a piece of chart paper, the teacher reminds students that it would have been irresponsible for the teacher to leave the class and do something else (from lesson one discussion). The teacher creates a graph of responsibilities students have such as caring for a pet, classroom clean-up, completing home chores, completing classroom jobs, or helping a friend or sibling. The students raise their hand if they have one of these responsibilities. Students analyze how many classmates had each of the responsibilities on the graph. Students compare graph categories by identifying which responsibilities have “more than” or “less than” other responsibilities. Next, the teacher shows students a large box with a cover and says, “I have a treasure inside that has something to do with responsibility. What do you think it is?” After eliciting student ideas the teacher opens the box and removes the class book titled “I am Responsible When…” which the class wrote during Unit One. The teacher reads the book, and the students reflect on their growth in writing, illustrating, thinking, etc. After reading the book the teacher returns to the graph of responsibilities and asks students what would happen if they did not show responsibility. The discussion is guided toward students understanding that it’s easier for people to get along when everybody shows responsibility.

     

     

     

     

    Lesson 3:  Being Fair

     
    Lesson 3 Supplemental Materials:
     
     
    Content Expectations:

    K - C2.0.2: Explain why people do not have the right to do whatever they want (e.g., to promote fairness, ensure the common good, maintain safety.)

     

    K - C2.0.3: Describe fair ways for groups to make decisions.

     

    Key Concepts: fairness

     

    Abstract: This lesson begins with the teacher reading the book The Sand Box, or a similar book that involves children treating another child unfairly. As the book is read the teacher asks: Was it fair for Tim and Johnny to tell Kylie she couldn’t join the game in the sandbox? Why or why not? In a turn and talk, students share their own experiences of being treated unfairly and how it felt. Students then brainstorm why it is important to do thing fairly. Responses are recorded on chart paper. The teacher shows students three favorite books and announces that there is only enough time to read one book. The teacher then poses the following question: How could we decide which book to read? The teacher makes a list of their suggestions on chart paper. After the list is created, the teacher guides students in evaluating each suggestion on the basis of fairness. The teacher guides the discussion to the term voting and explains that is how our country decides who our leaders are and other important problems
     
     

    Lesson 4: Talking About Problems

     
    Lesson 4 Supplemental Materials:
     
     
    Content Expectations:

    K - C2.0.3: Describe fair ways for groups to make decisions

     

    K - P3.1.1: Identify classroom issues.
    K - P3.1.2: Use simple graphs to explain information about a classroom issue.
    S.DS.00.01: Engage in substantive conversations, remaining focused on subject matter, with interchanges beginning to build on prior responses in literature discussions, paired conversations, or other interactions.
     

    Key Concepts: fairness, problem solving

     

    Abstract:  This lesson begins with the teacher explaining that because people live and work together in many groups, problems occur. The teacher reads students the book Talk and Work it Out or a similar book, which deals with strategies children can use for solving problems they have with others. As the book is read, the teacher guides students in identifying the different strategies described in the story and lists them on chart paper. Strategies include: Take time to think about the problem, talk about the problem, see how the other person feels and ask a grown-up to help. (Note: the book Talk and Work it out contains a teacher section with questions to guide  families or classrooms. The teacher then describes a problem they have observed in the classroom or school. For example: children aren’t cleaning up after themselves, arguments are occurring at the drinking fountain, sharing on the playground, etc. The class works together to solve the problem. On large chart paper titled: “How To Solve a Problem”, the teacher writes the following: Step 1: Talk about the problem. The teacher guides students in a substantive conversation about the problem. Step 2: Find out more about the problem. The teacher explains that the class will ‘observe’ and ‘gather information’ over the next two days about the problem. If applicable, this might include the creation of a pictograph showing the number of occurrences of the problem each of the two days.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Lesson 5: Working Together to Solve Problems

     
    Lesson 5 Supplemental Materials:
     
     
    Content Expectations:

    K - P3.1.3: Compare their viewpoint about a classroom issue with the viewpoint of another person

     

    K - P3.3.1: Express a position on a classroom issue.

    S.DS.00.01: Engage in substantive conversations, remaining focused on subject matter, with interchanges beginning to build on prior responses in literature discussions, paired conversations, or other interactions.

     

    Key Concepts: common good, problem solving

     

    Abstract:  This lesson continues the problem solving activity. Returning to the sequence chart labeled “How to Solve a Problem”, the class reviews the problem. The teacher writes: Step 3: think about ways to solve the problem on the chart. Students are guided in identifying different ways the class problem could be solved and writing the ideas on a separate piece of chart paper. After all the ideas have been written the teacher poses the following question: How will we choose which solution to use? After eliciting student ideas the teacher guides them in understanding that when solving a group problem it is important to consider what is best for everybody in the group, or for the common good. The teacher adds the following to the sequence chart: Step 4: Express your viewpoint. In a Turn- and- Talk activity each student shares their opinion with a partner and then with the whole class. The teacher then returns to the sequence chart and adds: Step 5: Choose the best solution. The teacher announces that they have heard all viewpoints and it is time to vote on a solution. Following the class vote, the teacher guides a discussion on how the class can best carry out their solution.

     

     

     

     

    Lesson 6: Making a Difference

     

    Content Expectations:

    K - P4.2.1: Develop and implement an action plan to address or inform others about a public issue.

    K - P4.2.2: Participate in projects to help or inform others
     

    Key Concepts: citizenship, responsibility

     

    Abstract:  Kindergarten students participate in a school wide service or awareness project such as a food drive; adopt a family, book drives, etc. Kindergarten students are asked to inform their family about the issue and project. The teacher guides students in understanding that people demonstrate good citizenship when they help others.

     

     

     

    Last Modified on 1/20/2009 2:08:44 PM

     

     

     

Last Modified on October 2, 2018