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    Unit 3: How Do I Get What I Need And Want?

     

    Overarching Question: 

     Why can't I have everything I want?

     

    Previous Unit: 
    Where Am I?
     

     
    This Unit:
    How Do I Get What I Need
    and Want? 
    Next Unit:
    How Do I Get Along With Others?


     
     

    Big Picture Graphic


     
     

    Questions to Focus Assessment and Instruction:
    1. How do I meet my needs and wants?
    2. Why do people trade?
    Types of Thinking:
    Identifying similarities
    and differences
     
    Descriptive 
     
     
     

     

     

     

     

    Unit Abstract (may include Historical Overview):

     

    In this unit students begin to construct knowledge of important economic concepts including wants, trade, goods and services. Students first distinguish between needs and wants using the book If You Give a Pig a Pancake and The Wanting Song. Students then differentiate between goods and services and recognize goods and services help to meet human wants. In the final lesson students explore the concept of trade and connect trade to the method of obtaining goods and services to meet human wants. Optional lessons for all day kindergarten and extensions are included. These lessons focus on building student understanding of the concept of goods, practicing historical inquiry as they look at old toys as examples of goods from the past. This lesson includes a variety of activities including interviewing a grandparent, playing a historic board game and analyzing historic photographs showing children and toys. In the final optional lesson students explore how ‘gifts of the Earth’ such as trees and water are used to make goods.

     

     

     

     

       

    Focus Questions:

     

    1. How do I meet my needs and wants?

    2. Why do people trade?

     

     

    Content Expectations:

     

    K - E1.0.1:  Describe economic wants they have experienced.

     

     

    K - E1.0.2: Distinguish between goods and services.

     

    K - E1.0.3: Recognize situations in which people trade.

     

     

    Integrated GLCE’s

     

    R.NT.00.02:

    Identify the basic form and purpose of a variety of narrative genre including stories, nursery rhymes, poetry, and songs. (English Language Arts)

     

    Key Concepts:

     

    economic wants

    needs

    services

    trade

     

     

    Lesson Sequence:

     

    Lesson 1: My Needs and Wants

    Lesson 2: Goods and Services

    Lesson 3: Trade
    Lesson 4: Old Toys – Exploring Goods from the Past
    Lesson 5: Using Gifts from the Earth to Make Goods
     

     

    Resources:

     

    Equipment/Manipulative

    Art Paper and Drawing Materials Such as Markers and Crayons

    Chart Paper and Markers

    Overhead Projector or Document Camera and Projector

    Optional: examples of old toys, especially old wooden toys

    Student Resources:

    De Regniers, Beatrice. Schenk.

    Was It a Good Trade? New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 2002.

     
    Graham, Bob & Rosen, Michael. Poems for the Very Young.  Kingfisher, 2004.
     
    Hall, Kirsten. Let's Trade: All About Trading. Children's Press, 2005.
     
    Miller, Bobbi.  One Fine Trade. Holiday House, 2009.

     

     

    Numeroff, Laura.

    If You Give a Pig a Pancake Big Book. New York: HarperCollins Publishers, 1998.

    Pohl, Kathleen.

    What Happens at a Toy Factory? (Where People Work Series). New York: Weekly Reader Early Learning Library, 2006.

     
    Puffin Books. 'Til All the Stars Have Fallen: A Collection of Poems for Children. Puffin Books, 1994.
     
    Thomas, Patricia. Nature's Paintbox: A Seasonal Gallery of Art and Verse. Millbrook Pr Trade, 2007.
     
    Ziefert, Harriet.  Let's Trade. Puffin Books, 1996.

     

    Teacher Resources:

    Channell, Geanie, et. Al. Focus: Grades K-2 Economics. National Council on Economic Education, 2007.

     

    Cipriano, Jeri S. Toys Long Ago (Yellow Umbrella Books). Bloomington, MN: Red Brick Books, 2006.
     
    Phipps, Barbara, et. Al. Teaching Strategies K-2: Teacher Resource Manual. National Council on Economic Education, 2005.

     

    Economics Posters

    . 26 August 2008 <https://www.kidseconposters.com>.

     

    Goods and Services Song

    . 26 August 2008 http://www.kidseconposters.com/songs/goods_services.html.

     

    Heyse, Kathy and Day Harlan. Half-Pint Economics for Kids. Indiana Council for EconomicEducation, 2004. Historic Toboggan Slide Game . 26 August 2008 <http://www.hfmgv.org/exhibits/toys/teachers/games.asp>.

     

     

    Kalman, Bobbie. Old-Time Toys. New York: Crabtree Publishers, 1995.

     

     

    Old Photographs of Children with Toys.

    Every Picture Tells A Story Project. The Henry Ford. 26 August 2008 http://www.hfmgv.org/exhibits/toys/teachers/picture.asp.

     

    The Trading Song

    . 26 August 2008 <http://www.kidseconposters.com/songs/trading_ces.html>.

     

    The Wanting Song

    . 26 August 2008 <http://www.kidseconposters.com/songs/wanting_song.html>.

     

    Resources for Further Professional Knowledge

     

    Carol Hurst”s Children’s Literature Site.

    26 August 2008 <http://www.carolhurst.com/>.

     

    Early Childhood Social Studies.

    26 August 2008 < http://patricia_f.tripod.com/ssmotor.html>.

     

    National Council on Economic Education

    . 26 August 2008 <http://www.ncee.net>.

     

    National Council for the Social Studies.

    26 August 2008 <http://www.ncss.org>.

     

    Online Lessons for each National Economics Standard.

    26 August 2008

     

    http://www.ncee.net/ea/standards/.

     

     

    Social Studies for Early Childhood and Elementary School Children :

    A Report from NCSS Task Force on Early Childhood/Elementary Social Studies. 26 August 2008

     

    http://www.socialstudies.org/positions/elementary/.

     

     

    Social Studies Lesson Plans and Resources

    . 26 August 2008 <http://www.csun.edu/~hcedu013>.

     

    Strategies for Teaching Social Studies

    . 26 August 2008

     

    <http://www.udel.edu/dssep/strategies.htm

    >.

     

    Teaching Social Studies

    . 26 August 2008

     

    http://www.proteacher.org/c/185_Teaching_Social_Studies.html.

     

     

      

     

    Lesson 1: My Needs and Wants
     
    Lesson 1 Supplemental Materials:
     
     

    Content Expectations:

     

    K - E1.0.1:

    Describe economic wants they have experienced.

     

     

    R.NT.00.02: Identify the basic form and purpose of a variety of narrative genre including stories, nursery rhymes, poetry, and songs.

     

    Key Concepts: wants

     

    Abstract: This lesson begins with as the teacher reviews the basic needs of food, water, clothingand shelter and explains that these are things all people need to live. The teacher than explains that people also have ‘wants’, which are things people would like to have. In a Turn-and-Talk activity students share something they want and a reason why they want it with a partner. Next, the teacher teaches students The Wanting Song from the following website: http://www.kidseconposters.com/songs/wanting_song.html . The class then sings the song while sitting in a circle and each student adds something they want when it is their turn. Next, the teacher asks what is the purpose of this song? Using the book If You Give a Pig a Pancake or a similar book the class creates a list on chart paper of all the things the pig wants in the book including syrup, a bath, bubbles, a toy, a visit to her family, tap shoes, music, etc. The teacher asks students what the purpose of the story is. The teacher guides students in a discussion about the pig in the book wanting a lot of things and poses the following question: Do people have many wants? The teacher guides the discussion so students understand that people want a lot of things and sometimes when people get one thing, it leads them to want more.

     

     

     

     

     Lesson Sequence:

    1.      To begin the lesson, review the basic needs from Unit 2, Lesson 6.  Begin by reviewing with the students that all people need food, water, clothing, and shelter in order to live.  Display “Basic Needs Photos”, located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 1), to review. 

     

    2.      After reviewing the ‘needs’ that all people have, explain that people also have ‘wants’.  Continue by explaining that ‘wants’ are things people do not need, but would like to have.  Using the “Basic Wants Photos,” located in the Supplemental Material (Unit 3, Lesson 1), show students the pictures of various ‘wants’ that people may have. 

     

    3.      Pair the students for a “turn-and-talk activity”.  Partner “A”, describes one ‘want’ that they have and explains why this item is a ‘want’ and not a ‘need’.  When partner “A” is finished describing a ‘want’; partner “B” shares a ‘want’ and explains why it is a ‘want’ and not a ‘need’. 

     

    4.      Next, teach the students The Wanting Song lyrics, located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 1).

     

    5.      After students have sung the song several times, place the students in a circle and then sing the song again.  This time have the students add something they want when it is their turn.

     

    6.      Continue with the lesson by reading the book If You Give a Pig a Pancake or a similar book to the students.  As the story is read use a large piece of chart paper to create a list of all the ‘wants’ the pig has in the story. Suggested answers can be found on “Pig’s Wants from: If You Give a Pig a Pancake” located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 1). 

     

    7.      After creating the chart, ask the students “What can we learn from the story?” Possible responses might include:

    ·        Things the pig wanted.

    ·        It is easy to want too much.

    ·        We want many things.

     

    8.      Next, guide the students in a discussion about the pig in the book wanting a lot of things.  As the students think about all the items the pig wanted, ask the following question: “Do people have many wants?”  Continue the discussion by explaining that people want a lot of things, but sometimes when people get one thing they want, it may lead them to want more things. 

     

    9.      Show “The Difference between Needs and Wants” movie located at www.discoveryeducation.com. (K-E1.0.1)This movie explains more about ‘needs’ and ‘wants’.

     

    10. Provide each student with a copy of “My Wants and Needs”, located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 1). Using this sheet, the students draw and label two pictures of items that they want and 2 pictures of items they need.  A finished example of the activity titled, “My Wants and Needs: Finished Example” is located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 1).

     

    11. Throughout this unit on economics, the students are going to create an “Economics Vocabulary Book.”  Copy and pass out the “Economics Vocabulary Book” found in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 1) to each student.  Help the students create (or copy down) a short sentence that explains what ‘needs’ and ‘wants’ are. After the students have written down a short sentence, provide them time to draw a picture of a ‘want’ and a ‘need’ that they have.  (Note: The “Economics Vocabulary Book” for the entire unit is located in the Supplemental Materials, (Unit 3, Lesson 1) for this lesson.  If desired, you can copy the whole book at one time, or copy the pages as needed with each lesson.)  Students will be adding to this book throughout the unit.

     

     

    Lesson 2: Goods and Services
     
    Lesson 2 Supplemental Materials:
     

     

    Content Expectations:

     

    K - E1.0.2:

    Distinguish between goods and services.

     

     

    R.NT.00.02:

    Identify the basic form and purpose of a variety of narrative genre including stories, nursery rhymes, poetry, and songs.

     

    Key Concepts: goods, services

     

    Abstract: This lesson begins with the teacher reviewing the class list of the pig’s wants created while reading the story. Next, the teacher asks students to identify everything on the list that is something that can be held or touched. As students identify objects the teacher circles them. Next, the teacher writes the term ‘goods’ on the bottom of the chart and explains that the things they circled are all called goods. Using a weekly advertisement from a local store, the teacher then guides students in identifying other examples of goods. The class returns to the pig’s list of wants and the teacher points out the term ‘music’ and reviews the page in the book where the pig wanted the little girl to play music for her. The teacher then poses these questions: Is playing music something you can touch or hold? Is it a good? The teacher guides students in concluding that playing music is not a good because you can’t hold it or touch it. The teacher then writes the term ‘services’ on the chart and draws an arrow to the word ‘music.’ The teacher explains that services are things people do for other people. In the book the little girl performed the service of playing music for the pig. Using illustrations, the teacher shares examples of common services which students are familiar with such as a person cutting someone’s hair, a person fixing a car, a doctor examining a child and a teacher in a classroom. As a closure activity, the teacher explains that they will learn a song to help them understand the difference between goods and services. The teacher teaches students the Goods and Services Song located at this website: http://www.kidseconposters.com/songs/goods_services.html
     
    Lesson Sequence:
     

    1.      Using the chart from Lesson 1, review all of the ‘wants’ Pig had.  After reviewing all of the ‘wants’, lead the students in identifying all of the things on the list that can be held or touched.  As the students identify the items that can be held or touched, circle those items. After all the items that can be held or touched are identified and circled, write the word ‘goods’ at the bottom of the chart. Emphasize goods are things we need or want that we can touch or hold.

     

    2.      Provide each student with a 12”x 18” piece of paper, glue, scissors, and newspaper advertisements and/or magazines.  Have students divide the paper in half.  On the left half, have them write the word “goods”.  Using the advertisements or magazines, lead students in identifying ‘goods’.  As the students find examples of ‘goods’, have them cut the examples out and glue them onto the left half of the piece of paper.  (The students will use the other half of the piece of paper later on in the lesson). 

     

    3.      Return to the chart of Pig’s ‘wants’.  Pick one of the words that are not circled like ‘music’.  Review the page in the story where the pig wanted the girl to play music.  After reviewing this page with the students, pose the following questions: “Is playing music something you can touch or hold? Is it a good?”  Lead the students to understand that ‘music’ is not a ‘good’ because it cannot be touched or held. 

     

    4.      Next write the word ‘services’ on the bottom of the If You Give a Pig a Pancake chart.  Explain that a ‘service’ is something that people do for other people.  Review how the little girl performed the ‘service’ of playing music for Pig. Guide students in identifying that the remaining (non circled words) are ‘services’ by underlining all of the words that are ‘services’.

     

    5.      Display “Pictures of Common Services”, found in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 2). Each of the photos shows examples of common services with which students should be familiar. As the photos are shown, lead the students to recognize that the services being performed cannot be touched or held. 

     

    6.      Return to the paper students began in Step 2. Have students write the word ‘service’ on the right side of the paper. Using the advertisements or magazines, lead students in identifying ‘services’.  As the students find examples of ‘services’, have them cut the examples out, and glue them onto the other half of the piece of paper.

     

    7.      Teach students the “Goods and Services Song” located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 2).

     

    8.      Finally, pass out the “Economic Vocabulary Books” or the individual “Goods” and “Services” pages to the students.  Copies of the “Economic Vocabulary Book” pages are located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 2).  Lead the students in writing a short sentence that explains what goods and services are.  Then allow the students time to draw a picture of a good and a picture of a service. 

     
     

     

     

    Lesson 3: Trade
     
    Lesson 3 Supplemental Materials:
     

     

    Content Expectations:

     

    K - E1.0.3: Recognize situations in which people trade.

    R.NT.00.02:

    Identify the basic form and purpose of a variety of narrative genre including stories, nursery rhymes, poetry, and songs.

     

    Key Concepts: trade

     

    Abstract: This lesson begins with the teacher posing the following question, How do we get goods and services that meet our wants? The teacher guides the discussion to the concept of trade and explains how most people trade money for goods instead of goods for goods.The teacher shares the book Was It a Good Trade?, or a similar book about trading. This book which uses rhymed verse describes a series of trades a man makes. As the book is read the class discusses what goods the man is trading, why the man is trading, and whether or not the various trades seem like good or bad trades. (Note, the phrase ‘good trade’ may confuse students as they have just learned a good is something you can hold or touch. Explain to students that the phrase ‘good trade’ in the book refers to whether the man gained from the trade.) The teacher explains that the students will learn another song to help them understand trade better. The teacher teaches students the Trading Song from this website: http://www.kidseconposters.com/songs/trading_ces.html

     

     

     

     Lesson Sequence:

    1.    Begin the lesson by posing the following question: “How do we get ‘goods’ and ‘services’ that meet our ‘wants’?”  Allow the students ample time to respond and as the discussion occurs, guide students to the concept of ‘trade’. Explain that a ‘trade’ occurs when two people switch items or exchange money for an item. 

     

    2.      On chart paper, write the title ‘Recent Trades’ at the top of the paper.  Ask the students what trades they have made recently.  Help jog their memory by reminding them of trades they might have made at snack time, recess, or lunch at school, or with a sibling, with a friend, or at a store outside of school.  As the students describe the trades, write a word or two down on the paper to represent the ‘trades’ the students have made.

     

    3.      Review the term ‘goods’ from the previous lesson.  Explain how most people ‘trade’ money for ‘goods’, instead of trading ‘goods’ for ‘goods’.  Refer back to the “Recent Trades Chart”.  Help the students identify which of the ‘trades’ involved people trading money for ‘goods’ by putting a circle around those ‘trades’.  Then help the students identify which of the ‘trades’ occurred by people trading ‘goods’ for ‘goods’ by underlining those ‘trades’.   

     

    4.      Next, share the story “Was It a Good Trade?”, or a similar book about trading, with the students.  As the book is read, point out the series of ‘trades’ the man makes.  As each ‘trade’ is made ask the students the following questions:

    ·        What goods does the man trade?

    ·        Why is the man trading?

    ·        Is the ‘trade’ a ‘good or bad trade’?

    (Note: the phrase ‘good or bad trade’ may confuse the students as they have just learned that a ‘good’ is something that you can hold or touch.  Explain to the students that a ‘good trade’ is a trade from which the person gains something. Conversely, a ‘bad trade’ is a trade in which the person does not gain anything.)

     

    5.      Give each student the “Good Trades, Bad Trades” sheet, located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 3). Guide the students to identifying one ‘good trade’ and one ‘bad trade’ that they have made. If needed, brainstorm ideas together on a dry erase board or large sheet of butcher paper to help provide some ideas for the students to use.  After the students have each identified a ‘good trade’ and a ‘bad trade’ that they have made, guide them to understanding that people usually trade because they benefit or gain from the trade. 

     

    6.      Teach the students “The Trading Song”, located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 3).

     

    Conclude the lesson by passing out the “Economics Vocabulary Books” to the students.  Guide the students in creating a short sentence and a picture that explains the word ‘trade’.  A copy of the “Economics Vocabulary Book” is located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 3). 
     
     

     

     

    Lesson 4: Old Toys: Exploring Goods from the Past

     
    Lesson 4 Supplemental Materials:
     
     

    Content Expectations:

     

    K - H2.0.4:

    Describe ways people learn about the past (e.g., photos, artifacts, diaries, stories, videos).

     

    K - E1.0.2:

    Distinguish between goods and services.

     

     

    Key Concepts: goods, history, past, historical evidence

     

    Abstract:  This lesson, which reviews the concept of ‘goods’, provides another opportunity for students to practice historical inquiry which was introduced in Unit One. The lesson begins with the teacher displaying the chart labeled “How Do We Learn about the Past?” which was created in Lesson 4 of Unit One and reviewing the three kinds of historical evidence listed on the chart: photographs, people’s stories, artifacts (things). The teacher then shares examples of old toys from one or both of the following books: Toys Long Ago, Old-Time Toys and explains that toys are an example of goods that children wanted in the past just like they do now. The teacher then guides students in identifying ways in which the toys shown are alike and different from toys now. In the next section of the lesson the teacher shares one or two historic photographs of children with toys such as those included in the Every Picture Tells A Story Project of the Henry Ford Museum at the following website: http://www.hfmgv.org/exhibits/toys/teachers/picture.asp. The teacher guides students in analyzing the photographs and describing not only the toys shown but also the clothes children are wearing. As an optional home project, students take home a sheet labeled What Was Your Favorite Toy? and interview a grandparent or other older adult who describes the toy on the sheet. The sheets are returned to school and read and shared by the teacher. As a closure activity which connects to math, the teacher prints off multiple copies of the Historic Toboggan Slide Game from this website: http://www.hfmgv.org/exhibits/toys/teachers/games.asp and teaches students how to play this very simple board game that was created 100 years ago.
     

     

    Lesson Sequence:

     

    1.      Begin the lesson by displaying and reviewing the “How Do We Learn About the Past” chart, which was created in Lesson 4 of Unit 1.  Remind the students of the three kinds of historical evidence listed on the chart: photographs, people’s stories, and artifacts (things).

     

    2.      If you have access to old toys, bring them in to share with students and explain that the old toys are artifacts. Read either Toys Long Ago or Old-Time Toys to the students.   As the stories are read or the artifacts are shared with the students, explain that the old toys are an example of ‘goods’ that children wanted in the past.  Continue by explaining that children wanted toys (goods) in the past the same way the students want toys (goods) today in the present.

     

    3.      Using a large sheet of chart paper, draw a Venn-Diagram.  Label one side of the Venn-Diagram “Past Toys”. Label the other side of the Venn-Diagram “Present Toys”. Label the center “Past and Present Toys”.

     

    4.      Lead students in completing the Venn diagram using the series of images of toys from the past and present located on pages 4-6 of the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 4).  (Note, you may choose to create 3 different Venn Diagrams, one for each page of toys.)  Guide the students in identifying ways that toys from the past are similar and different from present day toys.  Record the students’ answers in the appropriate places on the Venn diagram.

       

    5.      Display the series of images of children playing in the past, located on pages 8-9 of the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 4).  Lead students in analyzing the photos by asking questions that spiral in difficulty.  Begin with low level questions such as, “What do you see?” (Note: You can magnify the parts of the picture students describe by using a piece of white cardboard or cardstock paper. Hold the paper in front of the area of the image and move the paper closer to the students.)  Lead students in answering higher level questions such as “what do you think they are doing?” Have students point out evidence in the pictures by asking “what do you see that makes you think that?”  If necessary, help the students finish analyzing and describing the toys and the children with information they did not include.

     

    6.      The next part of the lesson is an optional take home project.  Provide each student with “What was your Favorite Toy?”, located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 4).  Students are to interview a grandparent or older adult about their favorite toy from childhood.  The page is designed so that either the student (with help from an adult) or the person being interviewed can write down the details of the project.  A finished example called “What was your Favorite Toy? Finished Example” is located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 4). Share students’ projects with the class.

     

    7.      Play a game from the past with students. Print off multiple copies of the “Historic Toboggan Slide Game”, located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 4). It is a simple board game that was created 100 years ago.  Using “Historic Toboggan Slide Game and Directions”, located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 4); teach the students how to play the game.  Then divide the students into pairs, and allow them ample time to play the game. 

     

     
     
     
    Lesson 5: Using Gifts from the Earth to Make Goods
     
    Lesson 5 Supplemental Materials:
     

     

    Content Expectations:

     

    K - G5.0.1

    Describe ways people use the environment to meet human needs and wants (e.g., food, shelter, clothing).

     

     

    Key Concepts: goods, human/environment interaction

     

    Abstract: In this lesson students connect back to Unit Two where they learned that the environment is often used to meet human needs and wants. The lesson begins with the teacher displaying an illustration of a tree drawn on chart paper and posing the question: What kinds of goods are made from trees? The teacher then asks students to look around the room and goods in the classroom that are made of wood. As students identify objects such as desks, wooden blocks and pencils the teacher writes the objects on the chart and then guides students in identifying less familiar objects that come from trees such as paper. The teacher then reminds students that trees are a ‘gift of the Earth’ and writes this term on the chart. Next, the teacher asks students to identify other gifts of the Earth they learned about in Unit Two, the most common one being water. The teacher then explains that gifts of the Earth such as trees and water are often used to make goods. In the next part of the lesson the teacher reads students the book What Happens at a Toy Factory?, or a substitute book. As the book is read, the teacher guides students in identifying how gifts of the Earth are used to make toys. For example, the book describes how one of the first things to happen in a toy factory is the designing of a toy on paper. The paper would come from trees.
     
    Lesson Sequence:
     

    1.      In this lesson, students connect back to Unit 2 where they learned the environment is used to meet human needs and wants.  Draw a tree on chart paper.  After displaying the illustration, pose the following question: “What kinds of goods do you think are made from trees?”. 

     

    2.      After posing the question, instruct the students to look around the room and identify goods in the classroom that are made of wood.  As students identify objects such as desks, wooden blocks, and pencils, write or draw pictures of the objects on the tree. 

     

    3.      After the students identify the more obvious objects, guide the students towards identifying less familiar objects that come from trees such as paper.  Again, write or draw pictures of the objects on the tree to identify the objects that come from trees. 

     

    4.      Next, remind students trees are a ‘gift from the Earth’ and write that term on the bottom of the chart paper.  An example “What Comes from Trees?” illustration and “What Comes from Trees? Finished Example” are located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 5). 

     

    5.      Ask the students to identify other ‘gifts from the Earth’ that they learned about in Unit 2.  Remind the students that the other gifts from the Earth include water and plants.  If desired draw a picture of all the gifts from the Earth on the overhead or board. Then explain that gifts from the Earth such as trees and water are often used to make goods. 

     

    6.      Read students the book, What Happens in a Toy Factory?, or a similar book.  As the book is read, guide the students to identifying how gifts from the Earth are used to make toys (or goods).  For example, the book describes how one of the first things to happen in a toy factory is the designing of a toy on paper, which comes from trees.  Continue to guide students toward identifying how gifts from the Earth are used to make other components of toys.

     

    7.      Copy and pass out “Gifts from the Earth Make Goods,” located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 5).  Students can complete this in the classroom or as a take home assignment.  The assignment has students identify goods in their homes that come from trees and water by drawing pictures or writing out the words.  As an option, post the completed sheets in the classroom or the hallway for others to see the goods from other students’ houses that come from trees and water.  A finished example, “Gifts of the Earth Make Goods: Finished Example”, is located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 3, Lesson 5). 

     

     
     
     

     

     
    Last Modified on 1/20/2009 2:08:44 PM

     

Last Modified on October 2, 2018