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    Unit 2: Where Am I?

     

    Overarching Question:

    Where am I and how do I meet needs and wants? 

     

     

    Previous Unit:

     

     Who Am I?

     

     

    This Unit:
     
    Where Am I?
    Next Unit:
     
    How Do I Get What I Need
    And Want?

     

     

     

     

    Big Picture Graphic 

     

    Questions to Focus Assessment and Instruction:
     
    1. Where am I?
    2. What do maps and globes show us?
    3. How do we describe places and locations?
    4. How do we use gifts from the earth?

    Types of Thinking:

     
    Descriptive
    Identifying similarities
    and differences 

     

     

    Unit Abstract (may include Historical Overview): In this unit students begin to understand important geographic concepts such as location, place and region, using environments which young students are familiar with including their classroom and school. Later lessons introduce students to increasingly complex regions including communities, states, country, and our earth. The first lesson lays a foundation for the geographic theme of location as students practice using positional words to locate places and things. In the next lesson, they explore the geographic themes of place and region as they learn how to describe important places in their immediate environment. The theme of location is reinforced as students learn how maps are used to represent places. Combining civics with geography students are introduced to the concept of a country and learn how our flag functions as a symbol of our country. Finally, students learn about the Earth and how humans interact with the environment to meet needs.

     

     

     

    Focus Questions:

     

     

    1. Where am I?

    2. What do maps and globes show us?

    3. How do we describe places and locations?

    4. How do we use gifts from the earth?

     

     

    Content Expectations

    K - H2.0.3:

    Identify the beginning, middle, and end of historical narratives or stories.

     

    K - G1.0.1:

    Recognize that maps and globes represent places.

     

    K - G1.0.2:

    Use environmental directions or positional words (up/down, in/out, above/below) to identify significant locations in the classroom.

    K - G2.0.1:

    Identify and describe places in the immediate environment (e.g., classroom, home, playground).

    K - G5.0.1:

    Describe ways people use the environment to meet human needs and wants (e.g., food, shelter, clothing).

    K - C2.0.1:

    Identify our country’s flag as an important symbol of the United States.

     

    Integrated GLCE’s

    R.NT.00.02:

    Identify the basic form and purpose of a variety of narrative genre including stories, nursery rhymes, poetry, and songs. (English Language Arts)

    W.GN.00.03:

    Write a brief informational piece such as a page for a class book using drawings, words, word-like clusters, and/or sentences. (English Language Arts)

     

     

    P.FM.00.11:

    Compare the position of an object (for example: above, below, in front of, behind, on) in relation to other objects around it. (Math)

    L.OL.00.11:

    Identify that living things have basic needs. (Science)

     

    E.SE.00.11:

    Identify Earth materials (air, water, soil) that are used to grow plants. (Science)

     

     

    Key Concepts:

     

    clothing

    country

    direction

    earth

    flag

    food

    globe

    location

    map

    natural features

    needs

    patriotism

    place

    region

    shelter

    state

    water

    world

     

     

    Lesson Sequence:

    Lesson 1: Locating Places and Things

    Lesson 2: Describing Important Places

    Lesson 3: Maps and Globes Represent Places

    Lesson 4: Getting to Know My Country

    Lesson 5: Our Earth

    Lesson 6: Gifts from Our Earth

     

     

     

    Resources:
     

     

    Equipment/Manipulative

    A Primary globe

    A simple map of Michigan, the United States and the World

    Art Paper and Drawing Materials Such as Markers and Crayons

    Butcher paper

    Chart Paper and Markers

    Cut outs representing areas of the classroom
    Overhead Projector or Document Camera and Projector

    Student Resources:

    Asch, Frank.

    The Earth and I. New York: Voyager Books Reprint Edition, 2008.

     

    Canizares, Susan.

    Red, White and Blue. (Social Studies Emergent Readers Series) New York: Scholastic, 1999.

     
    Cheyette Lewison, Wendy. F Is For Flag. Grosset & Dunlap, 2002
     
    Cohan, George. M. You're a Grand Old Flag.  Atheneum, 2008

     

    Douglas, Lloyd G. The American Flag (Welcome Books). New York: Scholastic, 2003.

     

     

    Ehlert, Lois. Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf. Orlando, FL: Harcourt Brace, 1991.
     
    Firestone, Mary. Our American Flag (American Symbols). Picture Window Books, 2002

     

     

    Glaser, Linda. Our Big Home. Minneapolis, MN: Millbrook Press, 2002.

     

     

    Green, Jen. Why Should I Protect Nature? New York: Barron’s Educational Publishing, 2001.
     
    McLeod, Elaine. Lessons from Mother Earth. Groundwood Books, 2002
     
    Maile, Getzen. Gifts from the Forest. Maka Pueo Press, 2008

     

     

    Marzollo, Jean. I am Water. New York: Scholastic, 1996.
     
    Nelson, Robin.  We Use Water. Lerner Publications, 2003
     
    Schmid, E. The Living Earth. North-South/Night Sky Books, 2000

     

     

    Titherington, Jeanne. Pumpkin, Pumpkin. New York: Greenwillow Books, 1986.

     

     

    Teacher Resources:

    Hall, Kristen. Buried Treasure: All About Using a Map. New York: Children’s Press, 2003.

     

     

    Shepard, Daniel. Map Search. Austin, TX: Steck-Vaughn, 2003.

     

     

    Resources for Further Professional Knowledge

     

    Carol Hurst's Children's Literature Site. 26 August 2008.

     

     

    Early Childhood Social Studies. 26 August 2008 http://patricia_f.tripod.com/ssmotor.html>.

     

     

    National Council for the Social Studies. 26 August 2008 .

     

     

    Social Studies for Early Childhood and Elementary School Children : A Report from NCSS Task Force on Early Childhood/Elementary Social Studies 26 August 2008 http://www.socialstudies.org/positions/elementary/.

     

     

    Social Studies Lesson Plans and Resources. 26 August 2008 http://www.csun.edu/~hcedu013/>.

     

     

    Strategies for Teaching Social Studies. 26 August 2008 http://www.udel.edu/dssep/strategies.htm.

     

     

    Teaching Social Studies . 26 August 2008 http://www.proteacher.org/c/185_Teaching_Social_Studies.html.

     

     

     

    Lesson 1: Locating Places and Things
     
    Lesson 1 Supplemental Materials:
     
     
    Content Expectations:

     

    K - G1.0.2:

    Use environmental directions or positional words (up/down, in/out, above/below) to identify significant locations in the classroom.

     

    P.FM.00.11:

    Compare the position of an object (for example: above, below, in front of, behind, on) in relation to other objects around it. (Math)

     

    Key Concepts:

    location

     

     

    Abstract:

    In this lesson, students combine math and geography to practice using simple directions and positional words to locate things and places. The lesson begins with the teacher displaying chart paper with the following words listed: above, below, in, out, in front of, behind, on, up, down. Using two objects, such as a small ball and a block, the teacher models each positional word. The teacher continues to change the position of the ball and block while asking the students to answer the question: Where is the ball? Next, with students sitting in a circle, the teacher asks them to stand up, sit down, raise their hand up, etc. This leads to a game of “Simon Says”. Students then play a game similar to “I Spy” the teacher describes the location of objects and students try to identify the objects. Next students are assessed using a photograph and are asked questions using positional words to identify the location of various objects in the picture. Finally, students are given an assessment on environmental directions and positional words.

     

    Lesson 2: Describing Important Places
     
    Lesson 2 Supplemental Materials:
     

    Content Expectations:

    K - G2.0.1:

    Identify and describe places in the immediate environment (e.g., classroom, home, playground).

     

    Key Concepts:

    community, place

     

     

    Abstract:

    In this lesson students explore the geographic theme of place which answers the question “What is  a place like?” The lesson begins with students considering the question “What is our classroom  like?” The teacher adds prompting questions such as: “What objects does our room have?” and  “What different areas are in our room?” Students are guided toward understanding they have now described their classroom. This means someone who has never seen it, has an idea about what the classroom looks like. Next, the class takes a ‘field trip’ to the playground in search of answers to the question: “What is our playground like?” As students add ideas, the teacher guides students in beginning to differentiate between natural features such as grass and trees, and human-made features such as the swings and a slide. This helps lay a foundation for first grade where students are expected to be able to differentiate between these two types of features. Next, the students identify and describe different types of homes using the book Houses and Homes, or a similar book or photos. Finally, students use words and pictures to  answer the question “What is my home like?”

    Lesson 3: Maps Represent Places
     
    Lesson 3 Supplemental Materials:
     
     
     

    Content Expectations:

    K - G1.0.1:

    Recognize that maps and globes represent places.

     

    Key Concepts:

    community, location, maps

     

    Abstract: In this lesson students begin to understand that maps represent places and they can be used to help find where places are and what places are like. The teacher guides the students in understanding that maps represent places from a ‘birds-eye’ view. (a view from high above) Using the book Mapping Penny’s World, or a similar book, the teacher shares a series of simple maps. Students understand the idea that maps represent places and have a key to help people understand the symbols. The teacher returns to the chart paper titled, “What is my classroom like?” (from lesson 2) Students then create a classroom map from their description of the classroom. Using a large sheet of butcher paper and cut outs representing objects in the classroom, the class creates a map of their classroom on the floor. Students help place the objects of the classroom such as doors, windows, centers, etc. on the paper. The teacher
    returns to book, Mapping Penny’s World, this time sharing the maps of the park, favorite places, and the instructional options for this are provided. Students learn that they are in their classroom, which is in their school, which is in their community.
     
     
    Lesson 4: Getting to Know My Country
     
    Lesson 4 Supplemental Materials:
     

    Content Expectations:

    K - G1.0.1:

    Recognize that maps and globes represent places

     

     

    K - C2.0.1:

    Identify our country’s flag as an important symbol of the United States.

     

     

    Key Concepts:

    country, state

     

     

    Abstract:

    Building on the use of maps, students are introduced to the concepts ‘state’ and ‘country’ and how they are represented on maps. In answering the question, ‘Where Am I?’ students’ will return to the envelope demonstration. To further understand that they are many places at one time as envelopes are placed inside larger ones.. Students learn their community is in a state called Michigan. Students are then introduced to the concept of country as they learn that the state of Michigan is in a country called the United States. Students briefly explore maps of Michigan and the United States. A simple assessment called, I Am in Many Places is given.  Students then explore symbols while learning that the US flag is a symbol of our country Next, students listen to a book such as Our Flag from Time for Kids Readers or The American Flag from Welcome Books.

     

    Lesson 5: Our Earth
     
    Lesson 5 Supplemental Materials:
     

    Content Expectations:

    K - G1.0.1:

    Recognize that maps and globes represent places.

     

     

    Key Concepts:

    Earth, map

     

     

    Abstract:

    In this lesson students begin to develop an awareness of the Earth. Students are again reminded they are many places at one time using the envelope demonstration. Students are asked if our country, the United States is part of a bigger area. After eliciting ideas, students examine a simple map of the world and are introduced to the term ‘world.” Pointing out the United States on the world map, students learn that the world is made up of many different countries. Students are introduced to another term for world, ‘earth’. Displaying a primary globe, the teacher explains that the Earth is large and are led to understand that a globe is a better way to show, or represent, the Earth. Using the primary globe, students locate areas of water, land, and mountains represented on the globe. Finally, the teacher shares a book such as Our Big Home or The Earth and I. As a culminating project, students create a class book.

     

    Lesson 6: Gifts from Our Earth
     
    Lesson 6 Supplemental Materials:
     

    Content Expectations:

    K -H2.0.3:

    Identify the beginning, middle, and end of historical narratives or stories.

     

     

    K - G5.0.1:

    Describe ways people use the environment to meet human needs and wants (e.g., food, shelter, clothing).

     

    R.NT.00.02:

    Identify the basic form and purpose of a variety of narrative genre including stories, nursery rhymes, poetry, and songs. (English Language Arts)

     

    L.OL.00.11:

    Identify that living things have basic needs. (Science)

     

     

    E.SE.00.11:

    Identify Earth materials (air, water, soil) that are used to grow plants. (Science)

     

     

    Key Concepts:

    Earth, food, needs, shelter

     

     

    Abstract:

    This lesson begins with a book about plants such as Pumpkin, Pumpkin or Red Leaf, Yellow Leaf. Students identify what plants need in order to grow (air, water, soil) while reading the story. After sharing the book, students understand that plants are ‘gifts of the Earth’ and people use plants to meet many of their needs. The class then completes a four column chart labeled: food, water, clothing, and shelter (a home), Students then classify needs of people: food, clothing, water and shelter and how we use the earth to help meet these needs. Finally, students are asked to readpresented a small gift-wrapped package. It is labeled “To You from the Earth.” The teacher reads the gift tag out loud and poses the question: What do you think is inside the box? After making a list of student answers on chart paper, the teacher hands the gift to a student who opens it. Inside are picture cards labeled plants, water, and tree. After sharing the cards with the rest of the class, the students complete the “Gifts from Earth” handout to show ways they use gifts from the Earth.

    Options for All Day Kindergarten

    Lesson 7: Taking Care of Our Earth

    Content Expectations:

    K - G5.0.1:

    Describe ways people use the environment to meet human needs and wants (e.g., food, shelter, clothing).

     

    K - C5.0.1:

    Describe situations in which they demonstrated self-discipline and individual

     

    responsibility (e.g., caring for a pet, completing chores, following school rules,

    working in a group, taking turns).

     

    W.GN.00.03:

    Write a brief informational piece such as a page for a class book using

     

    drawings, words, word-like clusters, and/or sentences. (English Language Arts)

     

    Key Concepts:

    Earth, place

     

     

    Abstract:

    In this lesson, students begin to develop environmental awareness and responsibility. The lesson begins with a review of Our Big Home or The Earth and I as well as the 4-column chart created in Lesson 6. Next, the teacher shows students a T-chart on chart paper with a smiley face on one side and a frown face on the other. The teacher than asks students to think of something that people do that hurts the Earth, or environment. Student ideas are listed onthe frown side of the chart. The teacher then guides students in expanding their list by sharing the book Why Should  I Protect Nature?, or a substitute book. As the book is read the teacher guides students in adding things the careless children in the beginning of the book did that hurt the environment including breaking tree branches and throwing trash to the frown side of the chart. Next, the class tries to find one good thing people could do to match each negative thing on the frown side of the chart. For example, on the smiley side next to the phrase ‘break tree branches’ the class could list ‘ plant trees’ and similarly ‘picking up trash’ could be listed next to ‘throwing trash.’ Students are encouraged to share examples of things they have personally done that showed responsibility toward the environment. Finally, students work together to create a class book called “Taking Care of Our Earth.” Each student contributes a page in which they complete and illustrate the following sentence stem: “I can take care of the Earth by…”

     

     

     

    Last Modified on 1/20/2009 2:08:44 PM

     

     

Last Modified on October 2, 2018