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    Who Am I?

     

    Overarching Question:

     Who am I and where do I live?

     

     

    Previous Unit:

     

     Preschool 

     

    This Unit:
     
    Who Am I?
    Next Unit:
     
    Where Am I?

     

     

     

     Big Picture Graphic

     

     

     

    Questions to Focus Assessment and Instruction:
     
    1. How are children alike and different?
    2. How can we learn about the past/
    3. Why is it important to get along with others and be responsible?

    Types of Thinking:

     
    Compare/Contrast
    Descriptive

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Unit Abstract (may include Historical Overview): 

    In this foundational unit students strengthen their sense of self and explore the importance of getting along with others and being responsible. Like all the subsequent units, this unit is well integrated with the English Language Arts Content Expectations. Lessons are designed to be at least one week in length so there is adequate time to develop concepts and make connections. The unit begins with a sharing session in which students explore ways they are alike and different from other students in the class. Then, following the sharing of the book I Like Me! or a similar book, they ‘celebrate themselves’ by identifying their positive characteristics and examples of responsible actions. In the next lesson, they begin to explore their role as a student. In addition, as a foundation for later lessons relating to geography they begin to explore their classroom environment. The next lesson lays a foundation for history as students explore different tools used to measure time and distinguish between yesterday, today and tomorrow using a calendar. Building on this understanding of time they look at different ways we learn about the past in the next lesson and discover through creating a timeline of their own life that they have a past. The last two lessons which lay the foundation for subsequent lessons in civics explore the importance of getting along with others and responsibility.

     

     

    Focus Questions:

    1. How are children alike and different?

    2. How can we learn about the past?

    3. Why is it important to get along with others and be responsible?

     

    Content Expectations:

    K - H2.0.1:  Distinguish among yesterday, today, tomorrow.

    K - H2.0.2: Create a timeline using events from their own lives (e.g., birth, crawling, walking, loss of first tooth, first day of school).

    K - H2.0.3: Identify the beginning, middle, and end of historical narratives or stories.

    K - H2.0.4: Describe ways people learn about the past (e.g., photos, artifacts, diaries, stories, videos).

    K - G2.0.1: Identify and describe places in the immediate environment (e.g., classroom, home, playground)

    K - C2.0.2: Explain why people do not have the right to do whatever they want (e.g., to promote fairness, ensure the common good, maintain safety).

    K - C5.0.1: Describe situations in which they demonstrated self-discipline and individual responsibility (e.g., caring for a pet, completing chores, following school rules, working in a group, taking turns).

    Integrated GLCE’s

    R.NT.00.03: Discuss setting, characters, and events in narrative text. (English Language Arts)

    R.CM.00.01: Begin to make text-to-self and text-to-text connections and comparisons by activating prior knowledge and connecting personal knowledge and experience to ideas in text through oral and written responses. (English Language Arts)

    M.UN.00.01: Know and use the common words for the parts of the day (morning, afternoon, evening, night) and relative time (yesterday, today, tomorrow, last week, next year). (Math)

    M.TE.00.02: Identify tools that measure time (clocks measure hours and minutes; calendars measure days, weeks, and months). (Math)

     

    Key Concepts:

     
    change

    citizenship

    commonality

    cooperation

    diversity

    geographic theme of place

    historical evidence

    past

    responsibility

    school

    the common good

    time

    timeline

     
     

     

    Lesson Sequence:

    Lesson 1: I am a Person

    Lesson 2: I Go To School

    Lesson 3: I Know About Time

    Lesson 4: I Have a Past

    Lesson 5: I Can Get Along with Others

    Lesson 6: I am Responsible

     

     

    Resources:

    Equipment/Manipulative- Art Paper and Drawing Materials Such as Markers and Crayons

    Chart Paper and Markers

    Overhead Projector or Document Camera and Projector
     
    Student Resources
     
    Bardhan-Quallen, Sudipta. The Mine-O-Saur.  Putnam Juvenile, 2007
     
    Beaumont, Karen.  I Like Myself.  Harcourt Children"s Books, 2004
     
    Carlson, Nancy.  I Like Me! New York: Puffin, 1990.
     

    Carlson, Nancy. ABC I Like Me! New York: Puffin, 1999.
     
    Children"s Press. George Washington: A Life of Self-Discipline (Blastoff! Readers: People of Character) Children"s Press, 2007
     

    Curtis, Jamie Lee.  When I Was Little. New York: Harper Collins, 1993.
     
    Esbaum, Jill.  Stink Soup.  Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2004
     

    Gainer, Cindy. I"m Like You, You"re Like Me: A Child"s Book About Understanding and Celebrating Each Other.  Minneapolis: Free Spirit Publishing ,1998.
     

    Johnston, Tony. Off to Kindergarten. New York: Cartwheel Books, 2007
     
    Meiners, Cheri. Know and Follow Rules. Free Spirit Publishing, 2005
     
    Nolan, Allia & Sakamoto, Miki. What I Do Best. Reader"s Digest, 2006
     
    Nolan, Allia.  What I Like About Me. Reader"s Digest, 2005
     
    Parr, Todd. It"s Okay To Be Different. Little, Brown Young Readers, 2009
     

    Uttley, Tracy. Molly McSholly Conquers Kindergarten. Edina, MN: Beaver’s Pond Press, 2004.
     

    Teacher Resources:
     
    Gainer, Cindy.  A Leader’s Guide to I"m Like You, You"re Like Me: A Child"s Book
    About Understanding and Celebrating Each Other.  Minneapolis: Free Spirit Publishing, 1998.
     
    Random House. America"s Children: Real-Life Stories and Poems About Children, Past and Present.  Random House, 1992
     

    Resources for Further Professional Knowledge:
     
     Carol Hurst”s Children’s Literature Site.  26 August 2008 <http://www.carolhurst.com/>.
     

    Early Childhood Social Studies.  26 August 2008 <http://patricia_f.tripod.com/ssmotor.html>.
     

    National Council for the Social Studies. 26 August 2008 <http://www.ncss.org/>.
     

    Social Studies for Early Childhood and Elementary School Children : A Report from NCSS Task Force on Early Childhood/Elementary Social Studies. 26 August 2008 <  http://www.socialstudies.org/positions/elementary/>.
     

    www.micitizenshipcurriculum.org  September 8, 2008 Social Studies Lesson Plans and Resources . 26 August 2008 <http://www.csun.edu/~hcedu013/>.
     

    Strategies for Teaching Social Studies . 26 August 2008< http://www.udel.edu/dssep/strategies.htm>.
     

    Teaching Social Studies. 26 August 2008 http://www.proteacher.org/c/185_Teaching_Social_Studies.html 

     

    Lesson 1:     I am a Person
     

     
    Content Expectations:

     
    R.CM.00.01: Begin to make text-to-self and text-to-text connections and comparisons by activating prior knowledge and connecting personal knowledge and experience to ideas in text through oral and written responses. (English Language Arts)

     

    Key Concepts:  different, diversity, responsibility, same

     

    Abstract:  In this foundational lesson students explore their sense of self by discussing different roles they have (sister, brother, son, kindergartner, twin, etc.) and things they like about themselves. The lesson begins with a circle game called “How Many of You?”. With students seated in a circle the teacher asks a series of questions including: How many of you have a brother? How many of you have a sister? How many of you are someone’s daughter? How many of you are a kindergartner? How many of you are the oldest child in your family? Students stand up if the question describes them. The teacher reminds students to look around to see who is standing amd points out students who are the same or different from themselves. Next, the teacher shares a book such as I Like Me! or ABC I Like Me!. After reading the story, the teacher leads a sharing session in which students identify and share something they like about themselves. Finally, the students begin a unit-long culminating activity by tracing their body and adding a role they have as a person.  This project is added to throughout the unit and culminates in the last lesson.

     

    Lesson 2:     I Go to School

     
    Lesson 2 Supplemental Materials:
     
     
    Content Expectations:

    K - H2.0.3:     Identify the beginning, middle, and end of historical narratives or stories.

     

    K - G2.0.1:     Identify and describe places in the immediate environment (e.g., classroom, home, playground).

     

    R.NT.00.03:   Discuss setting, characters, and events in narrative text. (English Language Arts)

     

    Key Concepts:  geographic theme of place, school, sequence

     

    Abstract: In this lesson students begin to explore their role as a student.  The lesson begins with the teacher posing the following question: How did you feel about coming to kindergarten this year? Students share their responses. The teacher then shares one or both of the following books: Molly McSholly Conquers Kindergarten or Off to Kindergarten. (Note that students are guided to make text to self connections and if both books are used students can be guided to make text-to-text connections as part of language arts.)  As the book is read the class identifies how the main character prepared for kindergarten, how she/he felt during kindergarten, and how she/he felt at the end of kindergarten.  The teacher creates a 3-column chart labeled: Beginning, Middle, and End. Using one or both of the books, students help fill in the chart.  Returning to the book the teacher shows students the illustration of the main character’s classroom. Students will describe the classroom in the story and compare it to their own.  As they describe the classrooms, the teacher introduces the concept of region.  Classroom regions include the reading area, play area, etc. Finally, the students return to their “I Am a Person” drawings from the previous lesson and add a picture of something they like about their classroom.   

     

     

    Lesson 3:     I Know About Time
     
    Lesson 3 Supplemental Materials:
     
     

     

    Content Expectations:

    K - H2.0.1:     Distinguish among yesterday, today, tomorrow.

     

    M.UN.00.01: Know and use the common words for the parts of the day (morning, afternoon, evening, night) and relative time (yesterday, today, tomorrow, last week, next year). (Math)

     

    M.TE.00.02:   Identify tools that measure time (clocks measure hours and minutes; calendars measure days, weeks, and months). (Math)

     

    Key Concepts:  time

     

    Abstract:  In this lesson students begin to explore the concept of time by learning about the past, the present, and the future. This lesson integrates two math GLCE’s dealing with time.The teacher introduces the idea there are tools that help people measure time. First, students begin to learn that a clock measures time in hours and minutes, but complete the development of the concept in a later math lesson. Second, the teacher guides them in identifying a calendar by helping students discover and discuss the terms ‘yesterday’, ‘today’, and ‘tomorrow.’ Next, the students illustrate a simple 3-column chart labeled ‘Yesterday’, ‘Today’, and ‘Tomorrow’ by drawing a picture of something they did yesterday, something they did today and something they plan on doing tomorrow. The lesson concludes with students adding a picture of a clock or a calendar to their “I Am a Person” project that will represent that they know about time.

     

    Lesson 4:     I Have a Past

     
    Lesson 4 Supplemental Materials:
     
     
    Content Expectations:

    K - H2.0.2:     Create a timeline using events from their own lives (e.g., birth, crawling, walking, loss of first tooth, first day of school).

     

    K - H2.0.4:     Describe ways people learn about the past (e.g., photos, artifacts, diaries, stories, videos).

     

    Key Concepts:  change, historical evidence, history, past, time, timeline

     

    Abstract:  This lesson builds on the previous lesson by expanding students’ understanding of time.  Using a calendar students recall events in previous months to understand they are part of the past. Next, the teacher shows a photograph of themselves as a baby or young child and explains that the photograph shows the teacher in the past. The teacher briefly shares information about their childhood and shows an artifact such as a toy or book. Students then explore the question: How Do We Learn About the Past? The teacher guides students in identifying photographs, stories, and artifacts (things) as ways people learn about the past. Students are told historians use historical evidence like photos, stories and artifacts to learn about the past. The lesson continues with students relating memories of their own past.  With parental assistance students create a simple timeline illustrating four important events in their life. Finally, as a literature connection, the teacher reads the book When I Was Little, or a similar book, that explores the concepts of the past and change over time from a child’s viewpoint.  The lesson concludes with students drawing a picture of a memory of their past to add to their “I Am a Person” image. 

     

     

     

    Lesson 5:     I Can Get Along With Others
     
    Lesson 5 Supplemental Materials:
     

     
    Content Expectations:

    K - C2.0.2:     Explain why people do not have the right to do whatever they want (e.g., to promote fairness, ensure the common good, maintain safety).

     

    Key Concepts:  citizenship, common good, cooperation

     

    Abstract:  In this lesson the students learn how getting along with others is beneficial.  It begins with students listening to a short scenario which describes a kindergartner who does not get along with others. Following the story, students are guided to identifying the child’s shortcomings which include failing to take turns, failing to share, being unkind to others, and believing he can do whatever he wants to do. The teacher poses the following question: Is it okay for him to behave this way? Why or Why not?  Students begin to understand that people cannot do anything they want to do and rules benefit us all by keeping us safen and making things fair. Next, students examine ways to get along with others and how to be a good citizen. They discuss ways the child in the story could improve how he gets along with others. Students then listen to the story “I’m Like You, You’re Like Me”, or a similar book, and discuss the importance of understanding and caring about other people. The lessons concludes with students adding a picture of how they get along with others and ways they are good citizens to their “I am a Person” project.

     

     

     

    Teacher Resource:

    Lesson 6:     I am Responsible
     
    Lesson 6 Supplemental Materials:
     
     

    Content Expectations:

    K - C5.0.1:     Describe situations in which they demonstrated self-discipline and individual responsibility (e.g., caring for a pet, completing chores, following school rules, working in a group, taking turns).

     

    Key Concepts:  citizenship, responsibility

     

    Abstract:  This lesson begins with the teacher writing the term ‘Responsibility’ on a large piece of chart paper and sharing some of his/her responsibilities including: I am responsible for keeping you safe; I am responsible for keeping the room organized; I am responsible for helping you learn;  I am responsible for sharing with other teachers; I am responsible for taking care of my family, etc. The teacher then poses the following question: What responsibilities do you have? As students share ideas, the teacher writes their responses underneath the term ‘Responsibility’ on the chart paper. When necessary the teacher prompts students with questions such as: Do any of you have some responsibility for a pet at home? What about school rules? What about some of the things we listed on our “How to Get Along with Others and Be a Good Citizen Chart?” Finally, each child finishes the stem: I am responsible when I…” and draws a matching picture.  Finally, the students complete the last part of their “I Am a Person” project by adding one responsibility that they have at home or at school. 
     
     

     

     

    Last Modified on 1/20/2009 2:08:44 PM

     

Last Modified on February 14, 2018