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    Link to MC3 Unit 7

     

     

    Key Concepts

    amendment

    Articles of Confederation

    Bill of Rights

    compromise

    consent of the governed

    Constitutional Convention

    federalism

    Federalists and Anti-Federalists

    Framers

    limited government

    public issue

    U.S. Constitution
    Additional Key Concepts
    contemporary  public policy
    ratification
    states

     

    Graphic Organizer

     

    Unit 7

    Middle School Foundations (see Grade 8, F1.3)

     

    Describe the consequences of the American Revolution by analyzing the

    ·         birth of an independent republican government

    ·         creation of Articles of Confederation

    ·         changing views on freedom and equality

    ·         and concerns over distribution of power within governments, between government and the governed, and among people.

     

     

     
     
     
     
     
    Unit Abstract:

    In this unit students explore the historical circumstances leading to the adoption of the United States Constitution and the Bill of Rights.  Beginning with a review of the colonists’ ideas about government and their experiences with Great Britain, students hypothesize about what kind of government the colonists would create. In doing so, they consider natural rights philosophy, state power, and regional differences. Students then learn about the Articles of Confederation with a focus on the distribution of power between national and state governments.  After exploring the passage of the Northwest Ordinance, students examine some of the problems the country faced under the Articles, including Shays’ Rebellion.  In considering possible changes to the Articles, students explore the Constitutional Convention and the Framers’ decision to construct a new constitution.  Using primary and secondary sources, students examine how the Framers sought to resolve differences among the states through a series of compromises.  As students examine the Constitution, they are introduced to the concept of federalism and analyze how it limits the power of government.   They review the reasons why the Framers wanted to build a strong national government, yet limit the power of that government and compare the positions of the Federalists and Anti-Federalists in the debates over ratification. Students describe the concern that some people had about individual rights and why the inclusion of a Bill of Rights was necessary. Particular attention is paid to the rights found in the first four amendments as they have their roots in the revolutionary experience. The unit concludes with students composing a persuasive essay on a public issue related to the Constitution.

      

     

    Content Expectations 

    5 – U3.3.1:     Describe the powers of the national government and state governments under the Articles of Confederation.

    5 – U3.3.2:     Give examples of problems the country faced under the Articles of Confederation (e.g., lack of national army, competing currencies, reliance on state governments for money).

    5 – U3.3.3:     Explain why the Constitutional Convention was convened and why the Constitution was written.

    5 – U3.3.4:     Describe the disagreements over representation and slavery at the Constitutional Convention and how the Framers addressed them in the Constitution (Great Compromise, Three-Fifths Compromise).[1]

    5 – U3.3.5:   Give reasons why the Framers wanted to limit the power of government (e.g., fear of a strong executive, representative government, importance of individual rights).

    5 – U3.3.6:     Describe the principle of federalism and how it is expressed through the sharing and distribution of power as stated in the Constitution (e.g., enumerated and reserved powers).

    5 – U3.3.7:     Describe the concern that some people had about individual rights and why the inclusion of a Bill of Rights was needed for ratification.

    5 – U3.3.8:     Describe the rights found in the First, Second, Third, and Fourth Amendments to the United States Constitution.

    5 – P3.1.1:     Identify contemporary public issues related to the United States Constitution and their related factual, definitional, and ethical questions.

    5 – P3.1.2:     Use graphic data and other sources to analyze information about a contemporary public issue related to the United States Constitution and evaluate alternative resolutions.

    5 – P3.1.3:     Give examples of how conflicts over core democratic values lead people to differ on contemporary constitutional issues in the United States.

    5 – P3.3.1:     Compose a short essay expressing a position on a contemporary public policy issue related to the Constitution and justify the position with a reasoned argument. 

     

    Assessment

    Selected Response Items

     
    5-U3.3.1
    Describe the powers under the Articles of Confederation of the national and state governments.
    Using a T-chart, list the powers of the national and state governments under the Articles of Confederation.
    Congress is the main governing body (nation)
    Has one vote in Congress(state)
    Requires nine of thirteen votes to pass a law  (nation)
    Is made up of one legislative branch  (nation)
    Can make money (nation and state)
     
    5U3.3.6
    Students will fill in the Venn Diagram listing the enumerated and reserved powers.
     
     
     
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    Constructed Response Items

    5 – U3.3.3  

    Explain why the Constitutional Convention was convened and why the Constitution was written.

    Explain why the Constitutional Convention was held and why the Constitution was written.

     

     

    5-U3.3.4

     Describe the Great Compromise and the Three-Fifths Compromise. 
    • The Virginia plan stated that representation would be based on population.
    • The New Jersey plan stated that representation would be equal.
    • The Great Compromise stated that Congress would be composed of 2 houses.
    • In the Senate each state would have two representatives.
    • In the House of Representatives, population would determine the number of representatives.
    • The southern states wanted slaves counted for population, but not taxes.
    • The northern states wanted slaves counted for taxes, but not for population.
    • The Three-Fifths Compromise counted 3 out of every 5 slaves for both taxes and population.
    • Furthermore, congress would take no action on slave importation for 20 years.

    5-U3.3.5 

    The students will write an essay explaining why the Framers wanted to limit the power of the government.

     

    Extended Response Items

    5-U3.3.7
      Describe why the Bill of Rights was included and necessary for ratification of the Constitution.
     
    Raft:  You are a represenatative from Massachusetts and you believe that the Constitution gives the national government too much power.  You are concerned that individual rights are not respected.  Write a letter to Congress stating your concerns and explain that your state would ratify the Constitution if a Bill of Rights is added.
     
     
     
    Performance Assessments
     
    5-U3.3.2
    Give examples of problems faced under Articles of Confederation - lack of national army, competing currencies, reliance on state governments for money. 
    Students take the role of a state official and create speeches arguing the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation.
    Examples:  problems with money, difficulty with trading, no executive or judicial branches, can't collect taxes,  can't pay soldiers, powerless in dealing with other countries.
     
    5-U3.3.8
    Given a copy of the first 4 amendments, the students will rewrite the amendments in their own words and set them to a well-known piece of music, such as, "The Twelve Days of Christmas."  Students will perform their musical numbers individually or in groups.
     

     

     
    5 – P3.1.1:    
    Identify contemporary public issues related to the United States Constitution and their related factual, definitional, and ethical questions.
    5 – P3.1.2:    
    Use graphic data and other sources to analyze information about a contemporary public issue related to the United States Constitution and evaluate alternative resolutions.
    5 – P3.1.3:    
    Give examples of how conflicts over core democratic values lead people to differ on contemporary constitutional issues in the United States.
    5 – P3.3.1:    
    Compose a short essay expressing a position on a contemporary public policy issue related to the Constitution and justify the position with a reasoned argument.

     

     
     
     
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Last Modified on February 14, 2018