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    Link to MC3 Unit 4

     

     

     

    Key Concepts

    African-American culture

    colonial self-government

    economic activities

    generalizations

    indentured servants

    labor force

    point of view/perspective

    regional differences

    royal government

    slavery

    staple-crops

    Triangular Trade
    Addtional Key Concepts
    agricultural
    cash crop
    free Africans
    goods
    immigration
    plantation
    merchant
    middle passage
    representative assembly

    Graphic Organizer

     
    Unit 4 
     
     
     
     
     

    Middle School Foundations (see Grade 8, F1.1)

     

    Describe the ideas, experiences, and interactions that influenced the colonists’ decision to declare independence by analyzing

    ·         colonial ideas about government (e.g., limited government, republicanism, protecting individual rights and promoting the common good, representative government, natural rights) 

    ·         experiences with self-government (e.g., House of Burgesses and town meetings).

     

     

     

    Unit
     
     
     
     
    Abstract:

    In this unit students examine the economic and political developments in the colonies prior to the end of the French and Indian War[1] and assess how these developments affected life in the colonies. After reviewing the three colonial regions, students focus on the economic attributes of the colonies. They take an in-depth look at the Triangular Trade routes, including the Middle Passage, and its consequence for both continents.  Students then explore the colonial labor force, noting differences between the New England and Southern colonies, and comparing the life of enslaved Africans and free Africans in the American colonies.  Emphasis is placed on the effect of “one-crop economies” (plantation grown staple crops) in the south, and its influence on various groups of people and daily life in the Southern colonies.  Students then shift their focus to New England and the Middle colonies, examining the diversity of economic activities and its affect on daily life in each region. Next, students investigate how colonial political experiences during the first half of the 18th Century influenced colonists’ views of their political rights and responsibilities. In doing so, they explore the shift of power from royal appointed governors to colonial representative assemblies and their influences on colonial life.  Throughout the unit, students consider life in the British colonies from the perspectives of different groups of people including women, wealthy landowners, indentured servants, American Indians, free Africans, and enslaved Africans. Students explore how Africans living in North America drew upon their African past and adapted elements of new cultures to develop a distinct African-American culture. By the end of the unit, students construct generalizations about the reasons for regional differences in colonial America.

     

      

    Content Expectations 

     

    5 – U2.1.1:    Describe significant developments in the Southern colonies, including:

    • patterns of settlement and control including the impact of geography (landforms and climate) on settlement

    • establishment of Jamestown

    • development of one-crop economies (plantation land use and growing season for rice in Carolinas and tobacco in Virginia)[1]

    • relationships with American Indians (e.g., Powhatan)

    • development of colonial representative assemblies (House of Burgesses) and royal government

    • development of slavery.

    5 – U2.1.2:    Describe significant developments in the New England colonies, including:

    • patterns of settlement and control including the impact of geography (landforms and climate) on settlement

    • relations with American Indians (e.g., Pequot/King Phillip’s War)

    • growth of agricultural (small farms) and non-agricultural (shipping, fishing, manufacturing) economies

    • the development of government including establishment of town meetings, development of colonial legislatures and growth of royal government[2]

    • religious tensions in Massachusetts that led to the establishment of other colonies in New England.

    5 – U2.1.3:    Describe significant developments in the Middle colonies, including:

    • patterns of settlement and control including the impact of geography (landforms and climate) on settlement

    • the growth of Middle colonies economies (e.g., breadbasket)

    • the Dutch settlements in New Netherlands, Quaker settlement in Pennsylvania, and subsequent English takeover of the Middle colonies

    • immigration patterns leading to ethnic diversity in the Middle colonies. 

    5 – U2.2.1:     Describe Triangular Trade including:

     

    ·        the trade routes

    ·        the people and goods that were traded

    ·        the Middle Passage

    ·        its impact on life in Africa.

    5 – U2.2.2:     Describe the life of enslaved Africans and free Africans in the American colonies.

    5 – U2.2.3:     Describe how Africans living in North America drew upon their African past (e.g., sense of family, role of oral tradition) and adapted elements of new cultures to develop a distinct African-American culture.

    5 – U2.3.1:     Locate the New England, Middle, and Southern colonies on a map.

    5 – U2.3.2:     Describe the daily life of people living in the New England, Middle, and Southern colonies.

    5 – U2.3.3:    Describe colonial life in America from the perspectives of at least three different groups of people (e.g., wealthy landowners, farmers, merchants, indentured servants, laborers and the poor, women, enslaved people, free Africans, and American Indians).

    5 – U2.3.4:     Describe the development of the emerging labor force in the colonies (e.g., cash crop farming, slavery, indentured servants).

    5 – U2.3.5:    Make generalizations about the reasons for regional differences in colonial America.

      

    Assessment

    Selected Response Items
     
    5- U2.2.2   -Students will fill a Venn diagram from a list of phrases about free and enslaved Africans.
    • mostly lived in the North
    • mostly lived in the South
    • often had no contact with family members
    • allowed to learn to read
    • not allowed to learn to read
    • earned a wage for their work
    • came from Africa
    • treated unfairly
     
    5-U2.3.2  - Match the following terms to the appropriate region -  New England, Middle, Southern Colonies.
     
    cash crop
    tobacco
    wheat
    shipbuilding
    rocky soil
    fishing
    trading
    whaling
    market towns
    plantations
    slaves
    lumber
    meeting house
    village green
    planter
     
    5-U2.3.3  - Match the following groups to the phrase describing their everyday life.
     
  • wealthy landowners             -owned land and did not have to do physical work
  • farmers                               -owned land and did do physical work
  • merchants                           -owned a business
  • indentured servants             -worked for another person until the indenture was paid
  • laborers                              -worked for another person for wages
  • poor                                   -did not or could not work
  • women                               -worked in the home
  • enslaved people                  -worked for another person for no wages for life
  • free africans                       -were free to work and earn a wage
  • American Indians               -were excluded from colonial society

 

Constructed Response Items
 
5-U2.1.3 - Describe how immigration led to diversity in the Middle Colonies. 

 

5 - U2.3.4 - Write a short essay describing how the legalization of slavery and cash crop farming influenced the shift from indentured servants to slavery.

 

5 - U2.3.5 - Write a short essay discussing the reasons for regional differences between the colonies.

 

Extended Response Items

 

 5-U2.2.3  Describe how Africans blended their old culture with their new life in the colonies - including sense of family, and role of oral tradition. 

 

Performance Assessments
 
5- US.2.1 -Students will draw the triangular trade route on a map of the Atlantic Ocean and label the people/goods traded and the direction of the trade.

 

Unit Assessment:
 
5-U2.1.1   
5-U2.1.2
5-U2.1.3
5-U2.1.4
 
 Decribe significant developments in the Southern colonies, Middle colonies, and New England colonies.
 
category
Southern colonies
Middle Colonies
New England Colonies
settlement patterns
 
 
 
climate
 
 
 
landforms
 
 
 
economy
 
 
 
Indian relations
 
 
 
government
 
 
 
expansion/growth
 
 
 
Create a map depicting the natural features of the three colonial regions and explain in writing how those features shaped the economy and culture of each region.                  
 
 
 
Related 6th Grade Meap Questions
1.  Why was farming an important industry in the southern colonies as compared to the northern colonies?
     A.  The land was good for growing a wide variety of crops.
     B.  The factories were better built and highly productive.
     C.  The railroad system was new and more developed.
     D.  The climate attracted a large number of laborers.