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      Link to MC3 Unit 2

       

      Key Concepts

      cause and effect

      chronology

      cultural diffusion

      culture

      Columbian Exchange

      exploration

      historical thinking

      human/environment interaction

      informational text

      perspective/point of view

      region

      three worlds
      Additional Key Concepts
      adapted
      astrolabe
      climate
      compass
      consequences
      Eastern Woodlands
      empires
      enslaved
      environment
      ethical
      exploration
      family structures
      Great Plains
      invention
      justify
      motivations
      nomadic
      obstacles
      oral tradition
      Pacific Northwest
      property ownership
      regions
      Southwest
      technological
      trade
      Graphic Organizer

    Unit 2

    Unit Abstract:

    In this unit students study early American History with a focus on the period prior to 1585[1].  Starting with the art of historical thinking, students review the questions historians ask in examining the past. After they reconsider the tools historians use (primary and secondary sources, artifacts), they explore their textbook as a type of secondary source. In doing so, students examine text structures, text features, and the role of informational text in learning about the past. This unit takes a separate examination of life in America, Africa, and Europe in order to set the stage for the convergence of these three worlds in America.  In doing so, this approach prepares students to understand the exchanges and conflicts that resulted from the convergence of three distinct peoples in America. Accordingly, students begin their study with America, using a geographic lens to identify major American Indian cultural groups and compare how people living in different geographic regions adapted to and modified their environments prior to the arrival of Europeans. Students take an in-depth examination into the life and culture of Eastern Woodland American Indians. Students then shift their focus to the continent of Africa.  In learning about how people lived in western Africa before the 16th century, students create a foundation for examining how the meeting of the three worlds affected people from this continent.  Next, students turn to Europe as global exploration began.  They analyze the goals, motivations, and developments that made sea exploration possible through case studies of various explorers.  Students explore the convergence of Europeans, American Indians, and Africans in North America after 1492. In considering the Columbian Exchange, students describe the widespread movement of plants, animals, foods, communicable diseases, ideas, human populations, and goods, and how human societies were affected.  Finally, students analyze the consequences of the encounters and exchanges among these three worlds and how people from each continent viewed the convergence. 

     

    Content Expectations 

    3 - H3.0.1:      Identify questions historians ask in examining the past (e.g., What happened? When did it happen? Who was involved? How and why did it happen?).[2]

    5 – U1.1.1:     Use maps to locate peoples in the desert Southwest, the Pacific Northwest, the nomadic nations of the Great Plains, and the woodland peoples east of the Mississippi River (Eastern Woodland).

    5 – U1.1.2:     Compare how American Indians in the desert Southwest and the Pacific Northwest adapted to or modified the environment.

    5 – U1.1.3:     Describe Eastern Woodland American Indian life with respect to governmental and family structures, trade, and views on property ownership and land use.

    5 – U1.2.1:     Explain the technological (e.g., invention of the astrolabe and improved maps), and political developments, (e.g., rise of nation-states), that made sea exploration possible.

    5 – U1.2.2:     Use case studies of individual explorers and stories of life in Europe to compare the goals, obstacles, motivations, and consequences for European exploration and colonization of the Americas (e.g., economic, political, cultural, and religious).

    5 – U1.3.1:     Use maps to locate the major regions of Africa (northern Africa, western Africa, central Africa, eastern Africa, southern Africa).

    5 – U1.3.2:     Describe the life and cultural development of people living in western Africa before the 16th century with respect to economic (the ways people made a living) and family structures, and the growth of states, towns, and trade.

    5 – U1.4.1:     Describe the convergence of Europeans, American Indians, and Africans in North America after 1492 from the perspective of these three groups.

    5 – U1.4.4:     Describe the Columbian Exchange and its impact on Europeans, American Indians, and Africans.

     
    Other Content Expectations Addressed[3]

                            R.IT.05.02:     Identify and describe informational text patterns including compare/contrast,

    cause/effect, and problem/solution.

    R.IT.05.03:     Explain how authors use text features including timelines, graphs, charts, diagrams, tables of contents, indices, introductions, summaries, and conclusions to enhance the understanding of key and supporting ideas.

     

     

     

    Assessment

    Selected Response Items

    5-U1.2.1    Explain how technology and the  rise of nation states led to increased exploration. 
                  
                      1.   Which of the following did not help increase exploration? 
                       A. desire to trade new products  B. development of technology  C.  discovery of the Northwest Passage  D.  rise of nation states
                      (Correct answer:  C)
                   
     
    5-U1.3.2  Describe the life and cultural development of people living in western Africa before the 16th century--economic structures, family structures, growth of states, towns,
                      and trade.
                      (True or False)
                      When children in Africa grew up they left home and moved to other villages.(F)

                      All Africans lived in small tribal villages and spoke the African language.(F)

                      Some West Africans traded slaves willingly, while others refused to take part in the trade. (T)

                      Most of the empires of Africa were located in the western regions.  (T)

    Constructed Response Items

     5-U1.1.3   Describe the Eastern Woodland way of life in the following areas--government and family structures, trade, and views on property ownership and

                       land use.

    government structure                                                                    
    family structure
    trade
    property ownership
    land use

    5-U1.2.1  Explain how improved technology made sea exploration possible.

                     The inventions of the compass and the _______________ along with the improvement of ________________ made sea exploration possible. 

    (Possible answers:  astrolabe, maps)

    5-U1.3.2  Describe the life and cultural development of people living in western Africa before the 16th century--economic structures, family structures, growth of 
                     states, towns, and trade.
                     
                     Prior to the expansion of the slave trade in West Africa, most people were _______________, __________________, ________________________ in order to make a living.           
                      
    (Possible answers:  farmers, miners, craftspeople, or traders)
     
                      Items traded in Africa included: ____________________, _____________________, and _________________________________.
     
    (Possible answers:  gold, salt, ivory, slaves, and cloth.)

     

     

    Extended Response Items

    5-U1.4.1   Describe the meeting of the Europeans, American Indians, and Africans in North America after 1492 from the point of view of each group. 
                      The students will write an essay with one paragraph from the point of view of each group.

     

    5-U1.4.4  Describe the Columbian Exchange and how it affected the different groups.

                     How did the Columbian Exchange lead to the beginning of the African slave trade?

                     How did the horses brought to America on the Columbian Exchange change the lives of the Plains Indians?


    Performance Assessments
    5-U1.1.1   Use a map to locate the American Indian cultural groups of North America.
                              Given an outline map of North America, students will use a color key to show the location of the desert Southwest, Pacific Northwest, Great Plains, and Eastern
                              Woodland Native American cultural groups. ( Map accuracy will be assessed. )
    5-U1.1.2    Compare the way the desert Southwest and Pacific Northwest peoples both adapted to and changed their environment.
                               Students have discussed the ways that the desert Southwest and Pacific Northwest peoples both adapted to and changed their environments.  Compare the                                ways in which these two Native American groups interacted with their different environments.  In planning your response, remember to be give specific examples
                               for each group. 
     
    5-U1.2.2   Use case studies of explorers to compare the goals, obstacles, motivations, and consequences of exploration.

                      Create a set of eight "baseball" cards each featuring an explorer.  Students receive scores in content and quality of "presentation." 

     
    5-U1.3.1   Use a map to locate the major regions of Africa. 

                      Locate the major regions of Africa on given map.

     
     
     
     
     
    Related 6th Grade MEAP Released Questions
    1.  In which locations did Native American groups have extremely cold winters?
        A. Plains and Southwest  B.  Eastern Woodlands and Plains  C.  Southeast and Southwest  D.  Eastern Woodlands and Southeast 

     

Last Modified on February 14, 2018