• Third Grade Social Studies:  Michigan Studies
     
    Unit 6:  Public Issues Facing Michigan Citizens

     

    Overarching Question: 

     

    How do state and national governments work to solve problems citizens face?

     

    Previous Unit: 

     

    The Government of Michigan

    This Unit: 

     

    Public Issues Facing Michigan Citizens

    Next Unit:

     

    Fourth Grade United States Studies

     

     
    m

    Questions To Focus Assessment and Instruction:

     

    1. How do responsible citizens resolve statewide problems?
    2. How do people learn about public issue in our state?
    3. Why do people disagree about the ways to solve problems facing people in Michigan?

    Types of Thinking

     

    Compare/Contrast

    Evaluation

    Perspectives

     

     

      
    Unit Abstract (may include Historical Overview): 
    In this unit students examine public issues relating to Michigan. The unit begins with an examination of the responsibilities of citizenship as students learn that one key civic responsibility is being informed about matters of public concern. Student explore a variety of public issues in the local community, identifying various points of view, and applying core democratic values to support their positions   (e.g., “Should a school ban the use of scooters on school grounds?,” or “Should a community tear down an historic barn in order to build a homeless shelter?”). Next, using a variety of resources including newspapers and Web sites, students identify current public issues in Michigan. After analyzing why these are public issues, they pose the policy issues as questions (e.g., “Should the state of Michigan provide funds for a rapid transit system in metropolitan Detroit?” or “Should Michigan establish a network of waterways and greenbelts?”). Students then address a public issue as a class with guidance by the teacher. They gather background information regarding the origin of the issue. Meeting in small groups students discuss various viewpoints on the issue and ultimately express a reasoned position on it by writing a short persuasive essay.  The unit concludes with students applying the steps of responsible citizenship by choosing a public issue in Michigan to investigate and writing a persuasive essay that supports their position on the issue.

     

    Unit Assessment:

     

    Unit Focus Questions:
    1. How do responsible citizens resolve statewide problems?
    2. How do people learn about public issue in our state?
    3. Why do people disagree about the ways to solve problems facing people in Michigan?

    Content Expectations:

    2 - P3.1.1:      Identify public issues in the local community that influence the daily lives of its citizens.

    3 - P3.1.1:      Identify public issues in Michigan that influence the daily lives of its citizens.

    3 - P3.1.2:      Use graphic data and other sources to analyze information about a public issue in Michigan and evaluate alternative resolutions.

    3 - P3.1.3:      Give examples of how conflicts over core democratic values lead people to differ on resolutions to a public policy issue in Michigan.

    3 - P3.3.1:      Compose a paragraph expressing a position on a public policy issue in Michigan and justify the position with a reasoned argument.

    3 - C5.0.1:      Identify rights (e.g., freedom of speech, freedom of religion, right to own property) and responsibilities of citizenship (e.g., respecting the rights of others, voting, obeying laws).

    3 - G5.0.1:      Locate natural resources in Michigan and explain the consequences of their use.

    3 - G5.0.2:      Describe how people adapt to, use, and modify the natural resources of Michigan.

     

    Unit Key Concepts:
    • core democratic values
    • informed decision
    • point of view
    • public issue
    • responsibilities of citizenship

    Duration:
    6 Weeks

     

    Lesson Sequence:

    Lesson 1:  What are Public Issues?

    Lesson 2:  Why do People Disagree about Public Issues?

    Lesson 3:  Exploring a Public Issue Facing Michigan Citizens

    Lesson 4:  Evaluating Possible Resolutions of a Public Issue Facing Michigan Citizens

    Lesson 5:  Composing a Short Essay on a Public Issue Facing Michigan Citizens

    Lesson 6:  Taking a Stand on a Public Issue Facing Michigan Citizens

     

    Assessment

     

      

    Resources (see lesson resources as well):

     

    Instructional Organization for the Topic

     

    Lesson 1:  What are Public Issues?

     

    Lesson Focus Questions:
    • What are my rights as an American citizen?
    • What are my responsibilities as an American citizen?
     
    Content Expectations:
    2 - P3.1.1       Identify public issues in the local community that influence the daily lives of its citizens.

    3 - C5.0.1       Identify rights (e.g., freedom of speech, freedom of religion, right to own property) and responsibilities of citizenship (e.g., respecting the rights of others, voting, obeying laws).

     

    Key Concepts:  public issues, responsibilities of citizenship

     
    Lesson Vocabulary:
    C5.0.1:  laws, voting
     
    Students will know:
    P3.1.1:  public issues that influence citizens' daily lives in Michigan.
    C5.0.1:  the rights and responsiblities of citizens.
    Students will be able to:
    P3.1.1:  idenfity public issues that influence citizens' daily lives in Michigan.
    C5.0.1:  identify important American rights of citizenship (freedom of speech, freedom of religion, right to own property).  Identify the responsibilities of citizens (respecting the rights of others, voting, obeying laws).
    Student friendly language:
    P3.1.1:  I can name a public policy in Michigan that affects me.
    C5.0.1:  I can explain my rights and responsiblitities as a citizen.
     
    Abstract:  This lesson begins with a review of what students have learned about the responsibilities of citizenship in the previous unit on Michigan government. Next, students discuss some of the ways citizens can participate in their government. Using the book City Green or a substitute book, students explore how citizens can work together to solve a problem. This launches a discussion of public issues and how people can work together to resolve them. They begin by discussing issues using examples that a family may face, such as picking up things on the floor or feeding a pet. Working in groups, students explore a community-related public issue and then identify public issues from their own local community.
     
    Handouts:
     
    Lesson Resources:
    United Streaming Resources:
    C5.0.1
    • The American Government-The Importance of Rules [segment (2:14)]
    • The American Government-What is Organization [segment (1:09)]
    • The American Government-Rules of American Government [segment (3:26)]

    Lesson 2:  Why Do People Disagree on Public Issues?

     

    Lesson Focus Questions:
    • What are Core Democratic Values?
    • Can you use the Core Democratic Values to support your opinion on a "teacher selected" public policy?
    Content Expectations:
    3- P3.1.3        Give examples of how conflicts over Core Democratic Values lead people to differ on resolutions to a public policy issue in Michigan.

     

    Key Concepts: core democratic values, point of view, public issues

     
    Lesson Vocabulary:  conflict
     
    Students will know:  that people have a different opinion on policy issues that relate to Core Democratic Values (e.g. common good, a power plant in a community, landfill)
    Students will be able to:  use a Core Democratic Value to support an opinion on a public policy.
    Student friendly language:  I can give an opinion on a public policy and support it using Core Democratic Values
     
    Abstract:  In this lesson students explore reasons people disagree about public issues. They begin by exploring an issue some communities may have. Students consider various points of view on the issue. They then examine how people may use core democratic values to support and justify the positions they take. Finally, students complete an individual activity requiring them to examine conflicting points of view, use core democratic values to support various viewpoints, and take a position on a new public issue.
     
    Handouts:
     
    Lesson Resources:
    United Streaming Resources:

     

    Lesson 3:  Exploring a Public Issue Facing Michigan Citizens

     
    Lesson Focus Questions:
    3-P3.1.1: 
    • What is a public issue?
    • Can you use a public issue example that affect our daily lives?
    3-P3.1.2:
    • Can you use a graph to analyze information about a public issue?
    3-G5.0.1:
    • What natural resources are found in Michigan?
    • Can you label these resources on a map?
    • How does the use of natural resources affect the envinorment?
    3-G5.0.2:
    • How do people adapt to their environment?
    • How do people use natural resources?
    • How do people change natural resources to accomodate themselves? 

    Content Expectations:

    3- P3.1.1        Identify public issues in Michigan that influence the daily lives of its citizens.

    3 - P3.1.2       Use graphic data and other sources to analyze information about a public issue in Michigan and evaluate alternative resolutions.
    3 - G5.0.1       Locate natural resources in Michigan and explain the consequences of their use.

    3 - G5.0.2       Describe how people adapt to, use, and modify the natural resources of Michigan.

     

    Key Concepts: public issues

     
    Lesson Vocabulary:
    P3.1.2:  resolution
    G5.0.1:  natural resources, consequences
    G5.0.2:  adapt, modify
     
    Students will know:
    P3.1.1:  public issues that influence citizens' daily lives in Michigan.
    P3.1.2:  how to use various data sources to decode information about apublic issue in Michigan and offer new resolutions.
    G5.0.1:  natural resources foudn within Michigan.
                  consequences of using natural resources.
    G5.0.2:  how people adapt to, use, and modify natural resources.
    Students will be able to:
    P3.1.1:  idenfity public issues that influence citizens' daily lives in Michigan.
    P3.1.2:  interpret graphic data on a public policy.
    G5.0.1:  locate natural resources on a map of Michigan.
                   explain the consequences of the use of natural resources.
    G5.0.2:  describe how people adapt to, use, and modify natural resources.
    Student friendly language:
    P3.1.1:  I can name a public policy in Michigan that affects me.
    P3.1.2:  I can give my opinion about other ways to solve public policy issues.
    G5.0.1:  I can label natural resources found in Michigan on a map.
                   I can explain what happens to the environment when natural resources are used.
    G5.0.2:  I can draw a picture to show how a natural resources has been used to amke a product (e.g. water=hydroelectricity, iron ore=steel, timber=houses, paper, etc.
     
    Abstract:  In this lesson students examine a specific public issue relating to Michigan using skills introduced and applied in earlier lessons. They explore the problems caused by brownfields and investigate where they are a public issue in Michigan. Students begin the lesson by reading an online account of a brownfield from the Environmental Protection Agency website. They learn that the EPA has defined brownfields as “an abandoned, idled, or under-used industrial and commercial facility where expansion or redevelopment is complicated by real or perceived environmental contamination.”  Students then explore facts relating to brownfields and study three examples of brownfield sites in Michigan. Finally, students examine the obstacles to and benefits from brownfield redevelopment.
     
    Handouts:
     
    Lesson Resources:
    United Streaming Resources:
    G5.0.1
    • Learning about Natural Resources (22:00) try to link to Michigan's Natural Resources
    • Water Smart-Water as Natural Resource (15:03) Teachers Guide and Test
    • Uses of Rocks and Minerals (18:00) link into Mining
    G5.0.2
    • American Geography Close Ups: Midwest Volume I (20:00)

    Lesson 4:  Evaluating Possible Resolutions of a Public Issue Facing Michigan Citizens

     

    Lesson Focus Questions:

    Can you use a graph to analyze information about a public issue?

     
    Content Expectations:
    3- P3.1.2        Use graphic data and other sources to analyze information about a public issue in
                            Michigan and evaluate alternative resolutions.

     

    Key Concepts:  informed decision, public issues

     
    Lesson Vocabulary:  resolution
     
    Students will know:  how to use various data sources to decode information about apublic issue in Michigan and offer new resolutions.
    Students will be able to:  interpret graphic data on a public policy.
    Student friendly language:  I can give my opinion about other ways to solve public policy issues.
     
    Abstract:  In this lesson students expand their knowledge of public issues by evaluating resolutions to the problems posed by brownfields. They learn about the EPA Superfund and the criteria used to label a site a “Superfund site.”  Using brownfields as an example, the teacher models a process used to evaluate solutions to public issues. Students then work in small groups generating possible solutions to the brownfield problems by considering historic, geographic, civic, and economic aspects of the problem. Finally, students evaluate several actual solutions to the problem and compare the solutions to those proposed by the student groups.
     
    Handouts:
     
    Lesson Resources:
     
    United Streaming Resources:

     

    Lesson 5:  Composing a Short Essay on a Public Issue Facing Michigan Citizens

     

    Lesson Focus Questions:
    3-P3.3.1: 
    • What is a pulic policy?
    • How do you feel about this policy?
    3-P3.1.3:
    • Can you give examples of conflicts due to public policies?
    Content Expectations:
    3 - P3.3.1       Compose a paragraph expressing a position on a public policy issue in Michigan
                            and justify the position with a reasoned argument.

    3 - P3.1.3       Give examples of how conflicts over core democratic values lead people to differ on resolutions to a public policy issue in Michigan.

     

    Key Concepts:  core democratic values, informed decision, public issues

     
    Lesson Vocabulary:
    P3.3.1:  public policy, reasoned argument
    P3.1.3:  conflict
     
    Students will know:
    P3.3.1:  how to justify their positiion on a public policy issue.
    P3.1.3:  that people have a different opinion on policy issues that relate to Core Democratic Values (e.g. common good, a power plant in a community, landfill)
    Students will be able to:
    P3.3.1:  write a paragraph expressing and supporting their position on a Michigan public policy.
    P3.1.3:  use a Core Democratic Value to support an opinion on a public policy.
    Student friendly language:
    P3.3.1:  I can write my opinion in a paragraph about a public issue in Michigan.
    P3.1.3:  I can give an opinion on a public policy and support it using Core Democratic Values.
     
    Abstract:  In previous lessons students examined brownfields as an example of a Michigan public issue. In this lesson they explore a solution to the brownfields issue that is presented as a public policy question. First they consider the civic responsibility of making informed decisions. Next students apply a decision-making process as they consider both sides of the public issue question including core democratic values that support each position. They use a writing plan to design and write a short essay expressing their position on the public policy question. Students use a peer editing process to edit and revise their persuasive arguments. 
     
    Handouts:
     
    Lesson Resources:
    United Streaming Resources:

     

    Lesson 6:  Taking a Stand on a Public Issue Facing Michigan Citizens

     

    Lesson Focus Questions:
    3-P3.1.1: 
    • What is a public issue?
    • Can you use a public issue example that affect our daily lives?
    3-P3.1.2:
    • Can you use a graph to analyze information about a public issue?
    3-P3.3.1: 
    • What is a pulic policy?
    • How do you feel about this policy?
    Content Expectations:
    3- P3.1.1        Identify public issues in Michigan that influence the daily lives of its citizens.
    3- P3.1.2        Use graphic data and other sources to analyze information about a public issue in Michigan and evaluate alternative resolutions.
    3- P3.3.1        Compose a paragraph expressing a position on a public policy issue in Michigan and justify the position with a reasoned argument.

     

    Key Concepts: core democratic values, informed decision, point of view, public issues, and responsibilities of citizenship

     
    Lesson Vocabulary:
    P3.3.1:  public policy, reasoned argument
     
    Students will know:
    P3.1.1:  public issues that influence citizens' daily lives in Michigan.
    P3.1.2:  how to use various data sources to decode information about apublic issue in Michigan and offer new resolutions.
    P3.3.1:  how to justify their positiion on a public policy issue.
    Students will be able to:
    P3.1.1:  idenfity public issues that influence citizens' daily lives in Michigan.
    P3.1.2:  interpret graphic data on a public policy.
    P3.3.1:  write a paragraph expressing and supporting their position on a Michigan public policy.
    Student friendly language:
     P3.1.1:  I can name a public policy in Michigan that affects me.
    P3.1.2:  I can give my opinion about other ways to solve public policy issues.
    P3.3.1:  I can write my opinion in a paragraph about a public issue in Michigan.
     
    Abstract:  In this lesson students apply what they have learned about public issues to a new public issue facing Michigan citizens. Applying the steps of responsible citizenship, students choose a public issue in Michigan to investigate and write a persuasive essay that supports their position on the issue.  The lesson integrates research as students use a variety of traditional sources and electronic technology in their investigations.
     
    Handouts:
     
    Lesson Resources:
     
    United Streaming Resources:

Last Modified on February 14, 2018