• Third Grade Social Studies:  Michigan Studies
     
    Unit 4:  Growth of Michigan
     
    4
     

    Unit Abstract:

    In this unit students combine what they have previously learned about geography, economics, and the early history of Michigan to explore the growth of Michigan after statehood.  The emphasis is on large-scale developments like the growth of manufacturing and population growth as opposed to specific historical eras and events.  Students explore how natural resources such as fertile soil, trees, and minerals influenced certain businesses to take root in Michigan.  By examining farming and the growth of manufacturing in Michigan, students further their understanding of ways in which people put natural resources to work.   They also explore how industries led to the growth of towns and cities.  Particular focus is placed on the significant role of the automobile industry in Michigan and how it helped Michigan’s cities and towns expand.  Students then explore push and pull factors of migration that led to population growth in Michigan and how different cultural groups have created unique regions within the state. Finally, students examine recent population trends in the state and explain the trends by applying geographic, economic, and historical concepts.

     

    Unit Assessment:

      

    Unit Focus Questions:
    How has Michigan changed over time?

     

    Content Expectations:

    3 - E1.0.3:      Analyze how Michigan’s location and natural resources influenced its economic

                            development (e.g., how waterways and other natural resources have influenced          

                            economic activities such as mining, lumbering, automobile manufacturing, and

                            furniture making). See also 4-H3.0.1 and 4 – H3.0.3.

    3 – H3.0.1:     Identify questions that historians ask in examining the past in Michigan (e.g., What

                            happened? When did it happen? Who was involved? How and why did it happen?).

                            See also 4-H3.0.1.

    3 - G4.0.2:      Describe diverse groups that have come into a region of Michigan and reasons why

                            they came (push/pull factors). See also 4-H3.0.2.

    3 - G4.0.4:      Give an example of how another cultural group in Michigan today has preserved and

                            built upon its cultural heritage (portions omitted). See also 4-H3.0.2, 4-H3.0.7.

    3 - E1.0.4:      Describe how entrepreneurs combine natural, human, and capital resources to  

                            produce goods and services in Michigan.
    4-H3.0.5:        Use visual data and informational text or primary accounts to compare a
                            major Michigan economic activity today with that same or a related activity
                            in the past. 
    4-H3.0.6:        Use a variety of primary and secondary sources to construct a historical
                            narrative about the beginnings of the automobile industry and the labor
                            movement in Michigan.
     

    Unit Key Concepts:

    • agriculture and manufacturing
    • automobile industry
    • economic trends
    • entrepreneur
    • human/environment interaction
    • human migration
    • natural resources
    • population
    • push/pull factors

    Duration:

    6 weeks

     

    Lesson Sequence:

    Lesson 1:  Economic Growth: How Natural Resources Influenced the Development of Michigan

    Lesson 2:  Manufacturing: Putting Resources to Work in Michigan

    Lesson 3:  The Growth of the Automobile Industry

    Lesson 4:  The Growth of Towns and Cities

    Lesson 5:  Population Growth: Pull Factors

    Lesson 6:  Push Factors and Population in Michigan

     

    Assessment

     

      

    Resources (see lesson resources as well):

    Fayette Cause and Effect Activity. Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Great Lakes, Great Parks, Great History: Do L.A.P.S. for Michigan. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Natural Resources, 1999.

     

    Fayette Historic Townsite Map Activity. Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Great Lakes, Great Parks, Great History: Do L.A.P.S. for Michigan. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Natural Resources, 1999.

     

    Forests in Michigan: Informational Selection and Assessment. Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Great Lakes, Great Parks, Great History: Do L.A.P.S. for Michigan. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Natural Resources, 1999.

     

    Resources for Further Professional Knowledge

    Dunbar, Willis F. and George S. May. Michigan: A History of the Wolverine State. 3rd rev. ed. Grand Rapids, MI: W. B. Eerdmans Pub. Co., 1995.

     

    Instructional Organization for the Topic

     

    Lesson 1:  Economic Growth: How Natural Resources Influenced the Development of Michigan

     

    Lesson Focus Questions:

    E1.0.3:  How do Michigan's natural resources help its economy?

    H3.0.1:

    • What is a historian?
    • What questions do historians ask?
    • How do historians learn about the past?

    Content Expectations:

    3 - E1.0.3       Analyze how Michigan’s location and natural resources influenced its economic development (e.g., how waterways and other natural resources have influenced economic activities such as mining, lumbering, automobile manufacturing, and furniture making). See also 4-H3.0.1 and 4 – H3.0.3.

    3 – H3.0.1      Identify questions that historians ask in examining the past in Michigan (e.g., What

                            happened? When did it happen? Who was involved? How and why did it happen?).

                            See also 4-H3.0.1

     

    Key Concepts:

    E1.0.3:  natural resources, agriculture and manufacturing, human/environment interaction 

    H3.0.1:  questions about the past

     

     

    Lesson Vocabulary:

    E1.0.3:  natural resources, economy

    H3.0.1:  historians

     

    Students will know:

    E1.0.3:  key economic ideas and how they affect Michigan

    H3.0.1:  the who, what, when, where, why, and how of teacher selected events in Michigan's past 

    Students will be able to:

    E1.0.3:  explain how Michigan's economy is influenced by its location and natural resources

    H3.0.1: 

    • list the questions that historians ask in examining the past
    • explain what types of sources historians use to answer questions about the past

    Student friendly language:

    E1.0.3: 

    • I can explain how Michigan's natural resources affect its economy.
    • I can explain how a business began because of resources that were available (use an example of the hydroelectric plant is using a resource to produce a service, fur trade, forestry, wind energy, etc.).

    H3.0.1:  I can use who, what, when, where, why, how to explain how historians answer questions about the past.

     

    Abstract:  In this lesson students explore how Michigan’s location and natural resources such as trees, minerals and fertile soil influenced the growth and development of the state. Numerous information resources are used including artifacts, literature, photographs, maps, and informational text.

     

    Handouts:

     

    Lesson Resources:

    E1.0.3

    United Streaming Resources:

    E1.0.3

    • American Geography: Midwest Volume I [selected segments]
    • Water Smart: Water on Earth-Lakes [segment (1:21)]

    Lesson 2:  Manufacturing: Putting Resources to Work in Michigan

     

    Lesson Focus Questions:

    E1.0.3:  How do Michigan's natural resources help its economy?

    H3.0.1:

    • What is a historian?
    • What questions do historians ask?
    • How do historians learn about the past?

     

    Content Expectations:

    3 - E1.0.3        Analyze how Michigan’s location and natural resources influenced its economic development (e.g., how waterways and other natural resources have influenced economic activities such as mining, lumbering, automobile manufacturing, and furniture making). See also 4-H3.0.1 and 4 – H3.0.3.

    3 – H3.0.1       Identify questions that historians ask in examining the past in Michigan (e.g., What happened? When did it happen? Who was involved? How and why did it happen?). See also 4-H3.0.1.

     

    Key Concepts: agriculture and manufacturing, natural resources, population

     

    Lesson Vocabulary:

    E1.0.3:  natural resources, manufacturing, waterway

    H3.0.1:  historian

     

    Students will know: 

    E1.0.3:  key economic ideas and how they affect Michigan

    H3.0.1:  the who, what, when, where, why, and how of teacher selected events in Michigan's past 

    Students will be able to: 

    E1.0.3:  explain how Michigan's economy is influenced by its location and natural resources

    H3.0.1:

     

    • list the questions that historians ask in examining the past
    • explain what types of sources historians use to answer questions about the past

    Student friendly language: 

    E1.0.3:  I can explain how Michigan's natural resources affect its economy.

    H3.0.1:  I can use who, what, when, where, why, how to explain how historians answer questions about the past. 

     

    Abstract:  In this lesson students explore the growth of manufacturing in Michigan using historical photography, timelines, and other resources. They examine the manufacturing of goods such as furniture, iron products, and cereal and how natural resources influenced the location of businesses. Finally, students consider how the move from “farm to factory” affected the growth of towns and cities.

     

    Handouts:

     

    Lesson Resources:
    E1.0.3

     

    United Streaming Resources: 

    E1.0.3

    • American Geography: Midwest Volume I [selected segments]
    • Water Smart: Water on Earth-Lakes [segment (1:21)]

    Lesson 3:  The Automobile Industry

     

    Lesson Focus Questions:

    E1.0.4: 

    • How do businesses use the resources (natural, human, and capital) to make goods and provide services?
    • Explain the difference between natural, human, and capital resources.

    Content Expectations:

    3 -E1.0.4       Describe how entrepreneurs combine natural, human, and capital resources to

                           produce goods and services in Michigan.

    4-H3.0.5:       Use visual data and informational text or primary accounts to compare a major Michigan economic activity today with that same or a related activity in the past.

    4-H3.0.6:       Use a variety of primary and secondary sources to construct a historical narrative about the beginnings of the automobile industry and the labor movement in Michigan.

     

    Key Concepts:  automobile industry, entrepreneur, manufacturing

     

    Lesson Vocabulary:

    E1.0.4:  entrepreneurs, natural resources, human resources, capital resources, goods and services

     

     

    Students will know:

    E1.0.4:  key economic ideas and how they affect Michigan 

    Students will be able to:

    E1.0.4:  describe how busineses combine resources (natural, human, and capital) to make goods and services 

    Student friendly language:

    E1.0.4:  I can explain how a business uses different resources to make goods and to provide services.

     

    Abstract:  In this lesson students explore the significant role the automobile industry has played in Michigan. Using Henry Ford as a case study of entrepreneurship, students continue to examine role of geography and people in the growth of Michigan. Students then construct a chart that compares the influence of automobile industry today with its influence in the past with respect to the economy and population.  They then use their comparison charts to construct a narrative about the automobile industry.

     

    Handouts:

     
    Lesson 5:  Population Growth: Pull Factors

     

    Lesson Focus Questions:

    G4.0.2:

    • What groups have settled in Michigan?
    • Why did they come?

    G4.0.4:

    • Describe modern day Native American life.
    • What is another group in Michigan today that honors its culture?

    Content Expectations:

    3 - G4.0.2       Describe diverse groups that have come into a region of Michigan

    and reasons why  they came (push/pull factors). See also 4-H3.0.2.

    3 - G4.0.4       Use data and current information about the Anishinaabeg and

    other American Indians living in Michigan today to describe the

    cultural aspects of modern American Indian life; give an example of how another cultural group in Michigan today has preserved and built upon its cultural heritage. See also 4-H3.0.2, 4-H3.0.7.

     

    Key Concepts:  human migration, push/pull factors

     

    Lesson Vocabulary:

    G4.0.2:  region

    G4.0.4:  Anishinaabeg, culture, heritage

      

    Students will know:

    G4.0.2:  groups that have come to Michigan and reasons they came

    G4.0.4: 

    • cultural aspects of modern Native American life
    • another teacher selected cultural group in Michigan and the building of their heritage

    Students will be able to:

    G4.0.2:  describe divers groups that have come to Michigan and identify the reasons they came

    G4.0.4: 

    • describe the cultural aspects of modern Native American life
    • explain how another cultural group preserved and built upon its cultural heritage

    Student friendly language:

    G4.0.2:  I can write about the different groups of people who first settled in what is now Michigan and tell why they came (Native Americans, Europeans). 

    G4.0.4: 

    • I can explain how the Anishinaabeg live in Michigan today.
    • I can name another group in Michigan (teacher selected) and explain how their culture is important to them.

    Abstract:  In this lesson students continue to explore pull factors that affected human migration to Michigan. Building upon how job opportunities such as logging, mining, and manufacturing served as a pull factor, students also explore other reasons why people settled in particular regions in Michigan. They then gather information on a cultural group that came into their region of Michigan and explore how that group has preserved and built upon its cultural heritage.

     

    Handouts:

     

    Lesson Resources:

    G4.0.4

    Lesson 6:  Push Factors and Population in Michigan

     

    Lesson Focus Questions:

    G4.0.2:

     

    • What groups have settled in Michigan?
    • Why did they come?

    G4.0.4:

     

    • Describe modern day Native American life.
    • What is another group in Michigan today that honors its culture?

    Content Expectations:

    3 - G4.0.2       Describe diverse groups that have come into a region of Michigan and reasons why  they came (push/pull factors). See also 4-H3.0.2.

    3 - G4.0.4       Use data and current information about theAnishinaabeg and other American

                            Indians living in Michigantoday to describe the cultural aspects of modern American
                            Indian life;give an example of how another cultural group in Michigan today has
                            preserved and built upon its cultural heritage. See also 4-H3.0.2, 4-H3.0.7.

     

    Key Concepts:  human migration, push/pull factors 

     

    Lesson Vocabulary:

    G4.0.2:  region

    G4.0.4:  Anishinaabeg, culture, heritage

     

    Students will know: 

    G4.0.2:  groups that have come to Michigan and reasons they came

    G4.0.4: 

    • cultural aspects of modern Native American life
    • another teacher selected cultural group in Michigan and the building of their heritage

    Students will be able to:

    G4.0.2:  describe divers groups that have come to Michigan and identify the reasons they came

    G4.0.4: 

    • describe the cultural aspects of modern Native American life
    • explain how another cultural group preserved and built upon its cultural heritage

    Student friendly language:

    G4.0.2:  I can write about the different groups of people who first settled in what is now Michigan and tell why they came (Native Americans, Europeans). 

    G4.0.4: 

    • I can explain how the Anishinaabeg live in Michigan today.
    • I can name another group in Michigan (teacher selected) and explain how their culture is important to them. 

    Abstract:  To further student understanding of human migration, students explore the reasons why people would leave a place (push factors).  Using literature about the Underground Railroad, students consider how slavery in the South was a push factor in human migration. They then consider other push factors that have affect and continue to affect migration such as lack of job opportunities, war, famine, or lack of freedom. The lesson concludes with students examine population trends in Michigan and applying geographic, economic, and historical concepts to explain those trends.

     

    Handouts:

     

    Lesson Resources:

    G4.0.4

    United Streaming Resources:

     

Last Modified on February 14, 2018