• Third Grade Social Studies:  Michigan Studies
     

    Unit 3:  The History of Michigan

     

    Overarching Question: 

     

    How have economics and the early history of Michigan influenced how Michigan grew?

    Previous Unit: 

     

    The Economy of Michigan

     

    This Unit: 

     

    The History of Michigan

    Next Unit:

     

    The Growth of Michigan

     
    m

    Questions To Focus Assessment and Instruction:

     

    1. How do historians learn about the past?
    2. How did people and events influence the early history of Michigan?

     

    Types of Thinking

     

    Cause and Effect

    Description

    Point of View

     

    Unit Abstract:

    In this unit students use primary and secondary sources of information to explore the early history of Michigan. They begin by examining the work of historians and the types of questions they ask. Then, they apply historical thinking skills to a study of American Indians in Michigan, exploration and early settlement. The unit provides a strong link to geography as students analyze ways in which both American Indians and settlers used, adapted to, and modified the environment.  Through stories and informational text, students examine Michigan’s past. Civics is naturally integrated as students explore how Michigan became a state. Throughout the unit, emphasis is placed on major historical concepts such as chronology, cause and effect, and point of view.

     

    Unit Assessment:

      

     

    Unit Focus Questions:
    1. How do historians learn about the past?
    2. How did people and events influence the early history of Michigan?

    Content Expectations:
    3 - H3.0.1:      Identify questions historians ask in examining the past in Michigan (e.g., What
                            happened? When did it happen? Who was involved? How and why did it happen?).

    3 - H3.0.2:      Explain how historians use primary and secondary sources to answer questions about the past. 

    3 - H3.0.3:     Describe the causal relationships between three events in Michigan’s past (e.g., Erie Canal, more people came, statehood).

    3 - H3.0.4:      Draw upon traditional stories of American Indians (e.g., Anishinaabeg – Ojibway (Chippewa), Odawa (Ottawa), Potawatomi; Menominee; Huron Indians) who lived in Michigan in order to make generalizations about their beliefs.

    3 - H3.0.5:      Use informational text and visual data to compare how American Indians and settlers in the early history of Michigan adapted to, used, and modified their environment. 

    3 - H3.0.6:      Use a variety of sources to describe interactions that occurred between American Indians and the first European explorers and settlers in Michigan.

    3 - H3.0.7:      Use a variety of primary and secondary sources to construct a historical narrative about daily life in the early settlements of Michigan (pre-statehood). 

    3 - H3.0.9:      Describe how Michigan attained statehood.

    3 - H3.0.10:    Create a timeline to sequence early Michigan history (American Indians, exploration, settlement, statehood).

    3 - G4.0.4:      Use data and current information about the Anishinaabeg and other American Indians living in Michigan today to describe the cultural aspects of modern American Indian life. 

     

    Unit Key Concepts:
    • cause and effect
    • chronology
    • culture
    • exploration
    • human/environment interaction
    • primary and secondary sources
    • settlement
    • statehood
    Duration:
    6 weeks

     

    Lesson Sequence:
    Lesson 1:  Thinking Like a Historian

    Lesson 2:  American Indians in Michigan

    Lesson 3: Traditional Stories of Michigan Indians

    Lesson 4:  Whose Michigan?

    Lesson 5:  Migration and Settlement in Michigan

    Lesson 6:  Writing a Historical Narrative

    Lesson 7:  Becoming a State

    Lesson 8:  Creating a Timeline of Early Michigan History

     
    Assessment
     
    Resources (see lesson resources as well):
    “The Great Mystery.” Great Lakes, Great Parks, Great History: Do L.A.P.S. for Michigan. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Natural Resources, 1999.

     
    Nothing Was Wasted. Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Great Lakes, Great Parks, Great History: Do L.A.P.S. for Michigan. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Natural Resources, 1999.

     

    “Voyageurs of the Great Lakes. Great Lakes, Great Parks, Great History: Do L.A.P.S. for Michigan. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Natural Resources, 1999.  
     
    “Voyageurs of the Great Lakes.” Great Lakes, Great Parks, Great History: Do L.A.P.S. for Michigan. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Natural Resources, 1999.

     
    Madeline La Framboise: Fur Trader. Michigan Department of Natural Resources. Great Lakes, Great Parks, Great History: Do L.A.P.S. for Michigan. Lansing, MI: Michigan Department of Natural Resources, 1999.
     
      Instructional Organization for the Topic
     

    Lesson 1: Thinking Like a Historian

    Lesson Focus Questions:
    3-H3.0.1: 
    • What is a historian?
    • What questions do historians ask?
    3-H3.0.2:  How do historians learn about the past?
     
    Content Expectations:

    3 – H3.0.1: Identify questions historians ask in examining the past in Michigan (e.g., What

                        happened? When did it happen? Who was involved? How and why did it happen?)
    3 - H3.0.2: Explain how historians use primary and secondary sources to answer questions about
                        the past.
     
    Key Concepts: cause and effect, chronology, primary and secondary sources
     
    Lesson Vocabulary:

    H3.0.1: historian

    H3.0.2: primary source, secondary source

     
    Students will know:

    H3.0.1: The who, what, when, where, why, and how of teacher selected events in Michigan's past.

    H3.0.2: Why historians use sources about the past.

    Students will be able to:

    H3.0.1: list the questions that historians ask in examining the past.

    H3.0.2: explain what types of sources historians use to answer questions about the past.

    Student friendly language:

    H3.0.1: I can use who, what, when, where, why, and how to explain how historians answers questions about the past.

    H3.0.2: I can explain how and why historians use primary and secondary sources to describe Michigan's past.

     
    Abstract: This foundational lesson introduces students to historical reasoning through the analysis of primary sources such as historical maps and a diary. They examine how historians are detectives of the past and use evidence from primary and secondary sources. Students then explore the chronology of the settlement of a village in Michigan and identify the causes and effects of events in the community.
     
    Handouts:
     
    LessonResources:
     
    United Streaming Resources:
     
    Lesson 2: American Indians in Michigan
    Focus Questions:
    3-H3.0.5:  How did American Indians and settlers use their environment to help them survive?
     
    3-G4.0.4: 
    • How could you describe modern day Native American life?
    • WHat is another group in Michigan today that honors its culture?
     
    Content Expectations:
    3 - H3.0.5:  Use informational text and visual data to compare how American Indians and settlers in
                        the early history of Michigan adapted to, used, and modified their environment.
    3 - G4.0.4:  Use data and current information about the Anishinaabeg and other American Indians 
                        living in Michigan today to describe the cultural aspects of modern American Indian life.
     
    Key Concepts: culture, human/environment interaction
     
    Lesson Vocabulary:

    H3.0.5: adapted, modified, environment

    G4.0.4: Anishinaabeg, culture, heritage, economic activity, preserved, data

     
    Students will know:

    H3.0.5: the adaptations used by Native Americans and early settlers to their immediate environment.

    G4.0.4: cultural aspects of modern Native American life.

    another teacher selected cultural group in Michigan and the building of their heritage.

    Students will be able to:

    H3.0.5: compare how early American Indians and settlers adapted to, used, and modified their environment.

    G4.0.4: describe the cultural aspects of modern Native American life.

    explain how another cultural group preserved and built upon its cultural heritage.

    Student friendly language:

    H3.0.5: I can tell you how Native Americans and settlers used their environment to help themselves.

    G4.0.4: I can explain how the Anishinaabeg live in Michigan today.

    I can name another group in Michigan (teacher selected) and explain how their culture is important to them.

     
    Abstract: In this lesson students apply what they have learned about the study of history to American Indian cultures in Michigan. They explore early American Indian groups in Michigan. Students then identify similarities and differences among the groups known as the “Three Fires.” Geography concepts are applied when students examine how American Indians used, adapted to, and modified the environment. The lesson concludes as students connect the past to the present by investigating American Indians in Michigan today.

     
    Handouts:

     
    LessonResources:
    • Adare, Sierra. Ojibwe. New York: Gareth Stevens Publishing, 2002.
    • Deur, Lynne. Nishnawbe: A Story of Indians in Michigan. Spring Lake, Michigan: River Road Publications, 1981.
    • Gibson, Karen Bush. The Potawatomi. New York: Bridgestone Books, 2003.
    • Great Lakes Clothing Sketches. 25 Jan. 2008 <http://www.nativetech.org/clothing/regions/region7.html>.
    • "The Huron Indians.” The Mitten. September 2002. Michigan History Magazine. 25 Jan. 2008 <http://www.michiganhistorymagazine.com/kids/pdfs/mittensept02.pdf>.
    • Kalman, Bobbie. Native Nations of the Western Great Lakes. New York: Crabtree Publishing, 2003.

    o Life in an Anishinabe Camp. New York: Crabtree Publishing, 2004.

    o Nations of the Eastern Great Lakes. New York: Crabtree Publishing, 2005.
    • Kreipe de Montaño, Marty. Coyote in Love with a Star. New York: Abbeville Press, 1998.
    • McCall, Barbara, et al. The Ottawa. New York: Rourke Publishing, 1992.
    • Potawatomi Fables. 25 Jan. 2008 <http://members.cruzio.com/~nikan/>.
    • “The Three Fires.” The Mitten. September 2001. Michigan History. 25 Jan. 2008 http://www.michiganhistorymagazine.com/kids/pdfs/mitten02.pdf>.
    • Van Laan, Nancy. Shingebiss: An Ojibwe Legend. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1997.
    • Whelan, Gloria. Night of the Full Moon. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1993.
    • *Cleland, Charles E. Rites of Conquest: The History and Culture of Michigan's Native Americans. Ann Arbor: University of Michigan Press, 1992.
    • *lifton, James A., George L. Cornell, and James M. McClurken. People of the Three Fires: The Ottawa, Potawatomi and Ojibway of Michigan. Grand Rapids, MI: Grand Rapids Inter-Tribal Council, 1986.

    H3.0.5

    G4.0.4

    United Streaming Resources:
    H3.0.4
    • Native Americans: People of the Forest (29:22) see also Teacher's Guide
    • Native Americans:The First Peoples-Eastern Woodlands [segment (3:14)]

    Lesson 3: Traditional Stories of Michigan Indians

    Lesson Focus Questions:  How can you use Native American legends to tell about their beliefs?
    Content Expectations:
    3- H3.0.4: Draw upon traditional stories of American Indians (e.g., Anishinaabeg – Ojibway          
                      (Chippewa), Odawa (Ottawa), Potawatomi; Menominee; Huron Indians) who lived in
                      Michigan in order to make generalizations about their beliefs.

    Key Concepts: culture

    Lesson Vocabulary: Anishinaabeg-Ojibway (Chippewa), Odawa (Ottawa), Potawatomi, Menominee, Huron Indians

    Students will know: about Native American beliefs.
    Students will be able to: use Native Americans (e.g. Anishinaabeg) legends to tell more about their beliefs.
    Student friendly language: I can read Native American legends to tell you about their beliefs.

    Abstract: In this literature-based lesson students add to their knowledge of American Indian cultures in Michigan by reading and analyzing traditional stories such as “Legend of the Sleeping Bear.” Students then analyze the strengths and weaknesses of traditional stories as sources of historical evidence.

    Handouts:

    LessonResources:
    H3.0.4
    United Streaming Resources:
    H3.0.4
    • Native Americans: People of the Forest (29:22) see also Teacher's Guide
    • Native Americans:The First Peoples-Eastern Woodlands [segment (3:14)]
    Lesson 4: Whose Michigan?
     
    Focus Questions:
    3-H3.0.5:  How did American Indians and settlers use their environment to help them survive?
     
    3-H3.0.6:  What was the relationship like between American Indians and European explorers and settlers?
     
    Content Expectations:
    3 - H3.0.5: Use informational text and visual data to compare how American Indians and settlers in
                       the early history of Michigan adapted to, used, and modified their environment.
    3 - H3.0.6: Use a variety of sources to describe interactions that occurred between American
                       Indians and the first European explorers and settlers in Michigan.

    Key Concepts: exploration, human/environment interaction

    Lesson Vocabulary:
    H3.0.5: settlers, adapted, modified, environment, American Indians
    H3.0.6: European explorers
     
    Students will know:
    H3.0.5: he adaptations used by Native Americans and early settlers to their immediate environment.
    H3.0.6: about the interactions between American Indians and European settlers.
    Students will be able to:
    H3.0.5: compare how early American Indians and settlers adapted to, used, and modified their environment.
    H3.0.6: describe interactions between American Indians and European explorers and settlers in Michigan.
    Student friendly language:
    H3.0.5: I can tell you how Native Americans and settlers used their environment to help themselves.
    H3.0.6: I can describe the relationship between early Native Americans and European explorers and settlers.

    Abstract: In this lesson students explore the movement of the French and British into Michigan and the influence of these newcomers on native cultures. Students analyze artifacts, maps, timelines, and other sources as they gather historical evidence about this time period in Michigan history.

    Handouts:

    LessonResources:
    H3.0.5

    H3.0.6

    United Streaming Resources:

    Lesson 5: Migration and Settlement in Michigan

    Lesson Focus Questions:
    3-H3.0.5:  How did American Indians and settlers use their environment to help them survive?
     
    3-H3.0.6:  What was the relationship like between American Indians and European explorers and settlers?
     
    Content Expectations:
    3- H3.0.5:  Use informational text and visual data to compare how American Indians and
                       settlers in the early history of Michigan adapted to, used, and modified their
                       environment.
    3 - H3.0.6: Use a variety of sources to describe interactions that occurred between American
                        Indians and the first European explorers and settlers in Michigan.
     
    Key Concepts: cause and effect, settlement
     
    Lesson Vocabulary:
    H3.0.5: settlers, adapted, modified, environment, American Indians
    H3.0.6: European explorers
     
    Students will know:
    H3.0.5: he adaptations used by Native Americans and early settlers to their immediate environment.
    H3.0.6: about the interactions between American Indians and European settlers.
    Students will be able to:
    H3.0.5: compare how early American Indians and settlers adapted to, used, and modified their environment.
    H3.0.6: describe interactions between American Indians and European explorers and settlers in Michigan.
    Student friendly language:
    H3.0.5: I can tell you how Native Americans and settlers used their environment to help themselves.
    H3.0.6: I can describe the relationship between early Native Americans and European explorers and settlers.

    Abstract: In this lesson students learn about early pioneer life in Michigan, including why settlement in Michigan was slow at first. Through primary sources and literature, students explore the challenges pioneers faced. They also analyze artifacts of an early settler cabin from an archaeological dig. Finally, students examine migration patterns and determine the causes and effects of the movement of people to Michigan.

    Handouts:

    LessonResources:

    H3.0.5

    H3.0.6

    United Streaming Resources:
    H3.0.6
    • French Explorers:The Explorations of the Mississippi Rivers-Marquette, Jolliet, and LaSalle (14:53)

    Lesson 6: Writing a Historical Narrative

    Focus Questions:  What was daily life like in early Michigan settlements?
     
    Content Expectations:
    3 - H3.0.7: Use a variety of primary and secondary sources to construct a historical narrative about
                       daily life in the early settlements of Michigan (pre-statehood).
     
    Key Concepts: primary and secondary sources, settlement

    Lesson Vocabulary: historical narrative

    Students will know: the differences between primary and secondary sources.
    Students will be able to: write a historical narrative about daily life in early Michigan settlements.
    Student friendly language: I can write about daily life in the early settlements of Michigan.

    Abstract:The lesson begins with a discussion of the elements of historical narrative based on the reading of a book such as “A Place Called Home.” Students then apply what they have learned about early settlement by using primary and secondary sources to write a simple historical narrative about daily life in the early settlement of Michigan.

    Handouts:

    LessonResources:
    H3.0.7

    United Streaming Resources:

    Lesson 7: Becoming a State

    Lesson Focus Questions:
    3-H3.0.9:  What events lead to Michigan's statehood?
     
    3-H3.0.3:  Can you name three events in Michigan's past and explain their relationship?
     
    Content Expectations:
    3 - H3.0.9: Describe how Michigan attained statehood.
    3- H3.0.3:  Describe the causal relationships between three events in Michigan's past (e.g. Erie
                       Canal, more people came, statehood).

    Key Concepts: chronology, statehood

    Lesson Vocabulary:
    H3.0.3: Erie Canal
     
    Students will know:
    H3.0.9: events in Michigan that helped it to gain statehood.
    H3.0.3: the sequence of events leading to Michigan's statehood.
    Students will be able to:
    H3.0.9: explain how Michigan gained statehood.
    H3.0.3: describe the relationship of three events that happened in Michigan's past (e.g. The Erie Canal opened, more people came to Michigan, the more people resulted in Michigan's statehood).
    Student friendly language:
    H3.0.9: I can make a time line to put events in order to show how Michigan became a state.
    H3.0.3: I can I can show how cause and effect influenced Michigan's statehood.

    Abstract: In this lesson students first explore factors that led to increased population growth in Michigan. They then examine the steps taken toward statehood and the significance of the Northwest Ordinance. Students analyze timelines and maps as well as other resources as they learn about Michigan attaining statehood. The influence of individuals in creating history is addressed through examples such as Lewis Cass and Stevens T. Mason.

    Handouts:

    LessonResources:

    H3.0.9

    United Streaming Resources:
    H3.0.3
    • Why Build the Erie Canal [segment (2:01)]

    Lesson 8: Creating a Timeline of Early Michigan History

    Lesson Focus Questions:
    3- H3.0.3:  Describe the causal relationships between three events in Michigan's past (e.g. Erie
                       Canal, more people came, statehood).
     
    3-H3.0.10:  Can you place Michigan's history in a sequential timeline?
     
    Content Expectations:
    3 - H3.0.3:  Describe the causal relationships between three events in Michigan's past (e.g. Erie
                        Canal, more people came, statehood).
    3 - H3.0.10: Create a timeline to sequence early Michigan history (American Indians,
                         exploration, settlement, statehood).

    Key Concepts: cause and effect, chronology

    Lesson Vocabulary:
    H3.0.3: Erie Canal
    H3.0.10: explorations, settlements
     
    Students will know:
    H3.0.3: the sequence of events leading to Michigan's statehood.
    H3.0.10: the sequence of events leading to Michigan's statehood.
    Students will be able to:
    H3.0.3: describe the relationship of three events that happened in Michigan's past (e.g. The Erie Canal opened, more people came to Michigan, the more people resulted in Michigan's statehood).
    H3.0.10: produce a timeline showing early Michigan history.
    Student friendly language:
    H3.0.3: I can I can show how cause and effect influenced Michigan's statehood.
    H3.0.10: I can make a timeline to put events in order to show how Michigan became a state.

    Abstract: Students summarize what they have learned about the early history of Michigan by creating a timeline. The teacher then uses a “think aloud” strategy to describe causal relationships among some of the events from the timeline. Using a graphic organizer that represents cause and effect, students analyze a causal relationship among events from the timeline.

    Handouts:

    Lesson Resources:

    • *Dunbar, Willis F. and George S. May. Michigan: A History of the Wolverine State. 3rd rev. ed. Grand Rapids, MI: W. B. Eerdmans Pub. Co., 1995.

    H3.0.10

    United Streaming Resources:
    H3.0.3
    • Why Build the Erie Canal [segment (2:01)]

    H3.0.10

    • To The Mississippi:Westward Expansion and the
Last Modified on February 14, 2018