• Third Grade Social Studies:  Michigan Studies
     
    Unit 2:  The Economy of Michigan

      

    Overarching Question:
     
    How have the geography and economy of Michigan shaped our past?
     
    Previous Unit:
     
    The Geography of Michigan
     
    This Unit:
     
    The Economy of Michigan
    Next Unit:
     
    The History of Michigan

    middle 

    Questions to Focus Assessment and Instruction:
     
    1. What do people consider in deciding what to produce and consume in Michigan?
    2. How do scarcity and choice affect what is produced and consumed in Michigan?
    3. How is Michigan part of the national and global economies?
     
    Types of Thinking
     
    Cause and Effect
    Description
     
     
     
     
     

     
    Unit Abstract:

    In this unit students explore the principles and concepts of economics through the lens of Michigan today. Students use what they have learned in the previous unit about Michigan’s natural resources to explore how natural, human and capital resources combine to influence the types of businesses in our state today.  Student then focus on the economic principles of scarcity, choice, and opportunity costs.  After identifying Michigan’s current economic activities, students explain the reasons for their location.  Using fruit as an example, students are introduced to how geography affects specialization and interdependence. The concept of interdependence exposes students to Michigan’s connection with the national and global economies. Finally, students explore the role of government with respect to goods, services, and incentives.

     

    Unit Focus Questions:

    1. What do people consider in deciding what to produce and consume in Michigan?

    2. How do scarcity and choice affect what is produced and consumed in Michigan?

    3. How is Michigan part of the national and global economies?

     

    Content Expectations:

     

    3 - E1.0.1:      Explain how scarcity, opportunity costs, and choices affect what is produced and consumed in Michigan.

    3 - E1.0.2:      Identify incentives (e.g., sales, tax breaks) that influence economic decisions people make in Michigan.

    3 - E1.0.4:      Describe how entrepreneurs combine natural, human, and capital resources to produce goods and services in Michigan.

    3 - E1.0.5:      Explain the role of business development in Michigan’s economic future.

    3 - E2.0.1:      Using a Michigan example, describe how specialization leads to increased interdependence (cherries grown in Michigan are sold in Florida; oranges grown in Florida are sold in Michigan).
    3 - E3.0.1:      Identify products produced in other countries and consumed by people in Michigan.
    3 - G4.0.1:      Describe major kinds of economic activity in Michigan today, such as agriculture (e.g., corn, cherries, dairy), manufacturing (e.g., automobiles, wood products), services and tourism, research and development (e.g., Automation Alley, life sciences corridor, university communities), and explain the factors influencing the location of these economic activities.     
    3 - C3.0.2:      Identify goods and services provided by the state government and describe how they are funded (e.g., taxes, fees, fines).

     

    Key Concepts:

    • choice
    • economic activites
    • economic devlopment
    • economics
    • entrepreneurship
    • incentives
    • interdependence
    • location
    • natural, human, capital resouces (productive resources)
    • role of government
    • scarcity
    • specialization
    • trade

    Duration

    6 weeks

     

    Lesson Sequence

    Lesson 1:  Using Resources to Produce Goods and Services in Michigan

    Lesson 2:  Scarcity, Choice and Opportunity Cost

    Lesson 3:  Michigan’s Economy today

    Lesson 4:  Specialization and Interdependence

    Lesson 5:  Michigan’s Economic Future

    Lesson 6:  The Role of Government in Michigan’s Economy

     

    Assessment

     

     

     
    Instructional Organization

     

    Lesson 1:  Using Resources to Produce Goods and Services in Michigan

     

    Lesson Focus Questions:

    E1.0.1: 

    • What is scarcity?
    • What is opportunity cost?
    • How do they affect what goods are produced and consumed in Michigan?
    E1.0.4:
    • How do businesses use the resources(natural, human, and capital) to make goods andservices?
    • Explain the difference betweennatural, human, and capitalresources.

     

    Content Expectations:

    3 - E1.0.1:      Explain how scarcity, opportunity costs, and choices affect what is produced and consumed in Michigan.

    3 - E1.0.4:      Describe how entrepreneurs combine natural, human, and capital resources to produce goods and services in Michigan.

     

    Key Concepts: capital resources, economics, entrepreneurship, human resources, natural resources

     

    Lesson Vocabulary: 

    E1.0.1:  scarcity, opportunity cost, producer, consumer

    E1.0.4:  goods and services

     

    Students will know:  Key economic ideas and how they affect Michigan

    Students will be able to:

    E1.0.1:  explain how scarcity, opportunity costs, and choices affect what is produced and consumed.

    E1.0.4:  describe how businesses combine resources (natural, human, and capital) to make goods and services.

    Student friendly language:

    E1.0.1: 

    • I can tell you the price of an item goes up when there is less to buy (use an example such as an auction, championship game tickets, or sports cards).
    • I can explain the cost of the choices I make.

    E1.0.4:  I can explain how a business began because of resources that were available (use an example of the hydroelectric plant is using a resource to produce a service, fur trade, forestry, wind energy, etc.)

     

    Abstract:  In this lesson students connect geography to economics as they explore how natural resources are used to produce goods and services in Michigan. They use specific examples such as the use of fertile soil to grow major crops. Students then use a Michigan product to dissect the resources necessary for production.  In exploring Michigan products, the concept of entrepreneurship is introduced.

     

    Handouts:

     

    Lesson Resources:

    E1.0.1

    United Streaming Resources:

    E1.0.1

    • Understanding Economics (25:00)
    • Economics: The Production, Distribution, and Consumption of Goods and Services [selected segments]

    Lesson 2:  Scarcity, Choice and Opportunity Cost

     

    Lesson Focus Questions:

    E1.0.1:

    • What is scarcity?
    • What is opportunity cost?
    • How do they affect what goods are produced and consumed in Michigan?

    E1.0.2:  What influences peoples' economic choices?

     

    Content Expectations:

    3 - E1.0.1:      Explain how scarcity, opportunity costs, and choices affect what is produced and consumed in Michigan.

    3 - E1.0.2:      Identify incentives (e.g., sales, tax breaks) that influence economic decisions people make in Michigan.

     

    Key Concepts:  choice, incentives, scarcity

     

    Lesson Vocabulary: 

    E1.0.1:  scarcity, opportunity cost, producer, consumer

    E1.0.2:  incentive, sales tax, economic decisions

     

    Students will know:  Key economic ideas and how they affect Michigan.

    Students will be able to:

     

    E1.0.1:  explain how scarcity, opportunity costs, and choices affect what is produced and consumed.

    E.1.0.2:  identify incentives that influence economic decisions.

    Student friendly language 

    E1.0.1: 

    • I can tell you the price of an item goes up when there is less to buy (use an example such as an auction, championship game tickets, or sports cards).
    • I can explain the cost of the choices I make.

    E1.0.2: I can identify reasons people make the conomic choices they do (sales, tax breaks, etc)

     

    Abstract:  This lesson begins with a simulation showing how scarcity results from the tension between limited resources and unlimited wants. Through a simulation, students make economic decisions based on scarcity, choice, and opportunity costs. During the simulation, incentives such as sales are introduced. They then apply these concepts to economic choices made in the state of Michigan by looking at how businesses and industries are affected by scarcity and incentives.  During the lesson, students explore what is produced and how it is produced in Michigan.

     

    Handouts:

     

    Lesson Resources:

    E1.0.1

    United Streaming Resources:

    E1.0.1

    • Understanding Economics (25:00)
    • Economics: The Production, Distribution, and Consumption of Goods and Services [selected segments]

    Lesson 3:  Michigan’s Economy Today

     

    Lesson Focus Questions: 

    • What human activities affect Michigan's economy?
    • List poducts grown and made in Michigan.
    • Why do people travel to Michigan?
    • How does the research universities do affect Michigan?

     Content Expectations:

    3 - G4.0.1:      Describe major kinds of economic activity in Michigan today, such as agriculture (e.g., corn, cherries, dairy), manufacturing (e.g., automobiles, wood products), services and tourism, research and development (e.g., Automation Alley, life sciences corridor, university communities), and explain the factors influencing the location of these economic activities.     

     

    Key Concepts:  capital resources, choice, economic activities, human resources, location, natural resources

     

    Lesson Vocabulary:  agriculture, manufacturing, toursim, goods and services, research and development

     

    Students will know: Economic activity in Michigan today.

    Students will be able to:  describe economic activity in Michigan and explain what influences the location of those activites.

    Student friendly language:  I can explain about a business in Michigan and explain why it is here (i.e. lumbering, automobile, fruit growers.

     

    Abstract:  In this lesson students apply choice as they explore where businesses in Michigan choose to locate. After students identify goods and services produced in their own local communities, they use a product map to identify the location of different types of economic activities in the state. They use their knowledge of Michigan’s physical and human geography to answer the question: “Why is this economic activity located here?” In doing so, students assess the relationship between economic activities and geographic factors (e.g., the fertile soil of the Thumb makes this region good for agriculture, research and development businesses located near university communities).

     

    Handouts:

     
    LessonResources:

               

    G4.0.1

    United StreamingResources:

     

    Lesson 4:  Specialization and Interdependence

     

    Lesson Focus Questions:

    E2.0.1: 

    • Why are Michigan products sold to other states?
    • Why are other states' products sold to Michigan?

    E3.0.1:  Name some products made in other countries that people in Michigan consume.

     

    Content Expectations:

    3 - E2.0.1:      Using a Michigan example, describe how specialization leads to increased interdependence (cherries grown in Michigan are sold in Florida; oranges grown in Florida are sold in Michigan).

    3 - E3.0.1:      Identify products produced in other countries and consumed by people in Michigan.

     

    Key Concepts: interdependence, specialization, trade

     

    Lesson Vocabulary:

    E2.0.1:  specialization, interdependence

    E3.0.1:  products, produced, consumed, import, export

     

    Students will know:

    E2.0.1:  That Michigan is dependent upon other states for products and vice versa.

    E3.0.1:  Products made in other countries and consumed by people in Michigan.

    Students will be able to:

    E2.0.1:  describe how specialized goods lead to more interdependence using a Michigan example.

    E3.0.1:  identify products produced in other countries and consumed by people in Michigan.

    Student friendly language:

    E2.0.1: 

    • I can explain how Michigan products are sold in other states.
    • I can explain how other states' products are sold in Michigan.

    E3.0.1:  I can look at different products and make a list of countries they were made in.

     

    Abstract:  In this lesson students explore the role Michigan plays in the national and global economies.  Students begin by brainstorming why people specialize (e.g., they have a special skill or talent, climate, availability of productive resources).  They then examine how specialization results in trade with others to meet their economic wants. Students then create a graphic organizer depicting the relationship among specialization, trade, and interdependence to answer the question: “Why is Michigan part of the national economy?”  They then further their understanding of global trade by identifying goods in their homes or school that are produced in other countries.

     

    Handouts:

     

    Lesson Resources:

    E.2.0.1:
    • oncampus.richmond.edu/academics/education/.../economics/economics.ppt

     United Streaming Resources:

     

    Lesson 5:  Michigan’s Economic Future

     

    Lesson Focus Questions:  How do new businesses affect Michigan's economy?

     

    Content Expectations:

    3 - E1.0.5:      Explain the role of business development in Michigan’s economic future.

     

    Key Concepts:  economic development, entrepreneurship

     

    Lesson Vocabulary:  economic future

     

    Students will know:  Key economic ideas and how they affect Michigan.

    Students will be able to:  explain how business development affects Michigan's future.

    Student friendly language:  I can explain that jobs are needed in Michigan.

     

    Abstract:  This lesson involves students using what they have learned about Michigan’s economic activities to make predictions about Michigan’s economic future. Students are introduced to the importance of business development and entrepreneurship for Michigan’s economic future through a short video clip. They then study of a specific new technology such as wind turbines. After exploring current economic challenges in Michigan, students work in small groups to design a plan for meeting one of the challenges.

     

    Handouts:

     

    Lesson Resources:

     

    United Streaming Resources:

     

    Lesson 6: The Role of Government in Michigan’s Economy

     

    Lesson Focus Questions:  What services are provided by the state government and how are they funded?

     

    Content Expectations:

    3 - C3.0.2:      Identify goods and services provided by the state government and describe how they are funded (e.g., taxes, fees, fines).

     

    Key Concepts:  role of government

     

    Lesson Vocabulary: state government, goods, services, taxes, fees, fines

     

    Students will know:  Goods and services provided by the state government and how they are funded.

    Students will be able to:  identify goods and services provided by the state government and describe how they are funded.

    Student friendly language:  I can match the state government services with how they are paid for.

     

    Abstract:  In this lesson students are introduced to the idea that the state government plays a role in Michigan’s economy.  After reviewing some of the services provided by local governments, they investigate goods and services provide by the state government (e.g., roads, state parks, police) By distinguishing among taxes, fees, and fines, student describe the how state goods and services are funded.  Students then consider a public issue relating to taxation.

     

    Handouts:

     

    Lesson Resources:

     

    United Streaming Resources:

     

     

Last Modified on February 14, 2018