• Lesson 9:  Describing the Geography of Michigan

     

    Big Ideas of the Lesson

     

     

     

    ·         A region is an area that has at least one feature that sets it apart from other areas.

    ·         Regions can be many different sizes.

    ·         One way to divide Michigan into regions is the Upper Peninsula and the Lower Peninsula.

    ·         Michigan also has some unique regions like the Thumb.

    ·         Michigan belongs to U.S. regions such as the Midwest Region and the Great Lakes Region.

     

     

     

    Lesson Focus Questions:
    G1.0.2:
    • What are the differences between physical and human characteristics?
    • Why do we use thematic maps?
    G2.0.1: 
    • What is a region?
    • How is Michigan divided into regions?
    G4.0.3:
    • How do waterways, roads, and railroads help people and goods to move throughout Michigan?
    • How is information passed from place to place or person to person?
    • What do people do when jobs are not available?
    • What makes goods, people, jobs, or information move from place to place?
    G5.0.1: 
    • What natural resources are found in Michigan?
    • Can you label them on a map?
    • How does the use of natural resources affect the environment?
    G5.0.2:
    • How do people adapt to their environment?
    • How do people use natural resources?
    • How do people change natural resources to help themselves?

    Content Expectations:

    3-G1.0.2      Use thematic maps to identify and describe the physical and human characteristics

                         of Michigan.

    3-G2.0.1      Use a variety of visual materials and data sources to describe ways in which

                         Michigan can be divided into regions.

    3-G4.0.3      Describe some of the current movements of goods, people, jobs or information to,

                         from, or within Michigan and explain reasons for the movements.

    3-G5.0.1      Locate natural resources in Michigan and explain the consequences of their use.

    3-G5.0.2      Describe how people adapt to, use, and modify the natural resources of Michigan.

     

    Key Concepts: geography, regions

     

    Lesson Vocabulary: 

    G1.0.2:  physical characteristics, human characteristics

    G2.0.1:  region

    G4.0.3:  goods and services

    G5.0.1:  natural resources, consequences

    G5.0.2:  natural resources, adapt, modify

     

    Students will know: 

    G1.0.2:  physical and human characteristics of Michigan

    G2.0.1:  the regions of Michigan

    G4.0.3:  current movements of goods, people, jobs, or information (to, from, or within Michigan)

    G5.0.1: 

    • natural resources found within Michigan
    • consequences of using natural resources

    G5.0.2:  how people adapt to, use, and modify natural resources 

     
    Students will be able to:

    G1.0.2:  identify the difference between physical and human characteristics of a region

    G2.0.1:  divide Michigan into regions with visual representations

    G4.0.3:  describe the current movements of goods, people, jobs, or information (to, from, or within Michigan)

    G5.0.1: 

    • I can label natural resources found in Michigan on a map.
    • I can explain what happens to the environment when natural resources are used.

    G5.0.2:  describe how people adapt to, use, and modify natural resources 

     
    Student friendly language:

    G1.0.2:  I can use a map to find cities, towns, roads, bridges, etc. and different landforms of Michigan.

    G2.0.1:  I can use a map of Michigan to label its regions.

    G4.0.3:  I can write about how iron ore is transported from the Upper Peninsula to factories in other ares and explain why (goods can be subsituted with people, jobs, or information).

    G5.0.1: 

    • I can label natural resources found in Michigan on a map.
    • I can explain what happens to the environment when natural resources are used.

    G5.0.2:  I can draw a picture to show how a natural resource has been used to make a product (i.e. water= hydroelectricity, iron ore=steel, timber=house, paper, etc.). 

      

    Abstract:  In this culminating lesson on the geography of Michigan, students construct questions that geographers might ask about Michigan based on the five themes of geography. They then use the questions to design a presentation (e.g., poster display, dramatization, newscast, PowerPoint) that answers the questions about the geography of Michigan. The presentation or visual aid used in the presentation may serve as a performance assessment.

      

    Handouts:

     

    Lesson Resources:

    G1.0.2

    G2.0.1

    United Streaming Resources:

    G1.0.2

    • Different Types of Maps: Thematic Maps [segment (3:52)]

    G5.0.1

    • Learning about Natural Resources (22:00)
    • Water Smart: Water As Natural Resource (15:03)
    • Uses of Rocks and Minerals (18:00)

    G5.0.2

    • American Geography Close Ups: Midwest Volume (20:00)

    Instructional Resources

    Equipment/Manipulative

    Michigan Map (desktop, wall, overhead, paper copies)

    Overhead projector or document camera/projector

    Student journal or notebook

    United States map

     

    Student Resource

    Blank Midwest Region map. 10 July 2009 <http://www.teachervision.fen.com/tv/printables/kt_maps/kt_map_midwest_plains.pdf>.

     

    Lewis, Anne Margaret. Hidden Michigan. Traverse City, MI: Mackinac Island Press, 2006.

     

    McConnell, David. Meet Michigan. Hillsdale, MI: Hillsdale Educational Publishers, 2009. 34-36, 306-312.

     

    Teacher Resource

    Egbo, Carol. Supplemental Materials (Unit 1, Lesson 9). Teacher-made material. Michigan Citizenship Collaborative Curriculum, 2009.

     

    Michigan Maps. Michigan Advantage.org. 10 July 2009 <http://www.michiganadvantage.org/Reference/Maps/Default.aspx>.

     
    Lesson Sequence

    1.    Using Word Card #44, explain to students that a region is an area with at least one feature, or characteristic that sets it apart from other areas. Geographers say that these common features, or characteristics, help “bind a region together.” Tell students that in this lesson they will explore different ways to divide Michigan into regions. They will also explore different regions to which Michigan belongs. Note that this lesson can be supplemented with pages 34 – 36 and 306-312 in Meet Michigan or similar pages in another textbook on Michigan.

     

    2.    Explain to students that regions can be large or small. Ask them to think of ways to divide their school into regions. If possible, make an overhead transparency of a map of your school for students to observe. Discuss student ideas. Possible regions in a school include: gym, office, classroom wing, library, restrooms, and boiler room. A similar demonstration can be done using the classroom.

     

    3.    Explain to students that communities are examples of regions. They can be defined as a region because the people of a community share a government. Communities can also be divided into smaller regions. Ask students to think of examples of regions in their local community. Discuss student responses. Possible answers include school areas, a downtown section, a factory section, etc.

     

    4.    Ask students what regions could be identified in Michigan that are larger than communities but smaller than the state itself. Discuss student responses. Guide students to the idea that counties can be considered regions.  Ask students what characteristics make counties qualify as regions. Discuss student ideas. Possible answers include the following:

      • People in a county share a government.
      • People in a county often share a park system and/ or a system of roads.

     

    5.    Tell students that like each of the fifty states in the United States, Michigan is a region. It has its own government and also other characteristics that distinguish it from other states. Explain that Michigan can be subdivided into smaller regions also. Have students work in pairs and give each pair a copy of the “Dividing Michigan Into Regions Activity Sheet,” located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 1, Lesson 9).Tell students to work with their partner to try and find at least two different ways to divide Michigan into regions. Before beginning, provide students with desktop maps of Michigan or a large wall map for them to use in deciding how to divide Michigan into regions. Also encourage students to consider human and natural (physical) characteristics such as rivers, cities, highways, vegetation, population, etc. when dividing Michigan into regions.  Explain that they should make lines on the outline maps to show the regions and then describe why they divided Michigan in this way.

     

    6.    Give students time to work on the activity and then have them share their ideas with the entire class. Guide students in analyzing the various student methods of regionalizing Michigan by exploring both unique regions and those that are very common among much of the class.

     

    7.    Explain to students that a common way to divide Michigan into regions is by dividing it into the Upper and Lower Peninsulas. Note that this was probably a common method used by student pairs in Steps 5 and 6. Ask students for the reasons they divided Michigan into the two peninsulas. List student ideas on an overhead transparency or chalkboard. Possible reasons include:

      • The Lower Peninsula has more people.
      • The Lower Peninsula has better farmland.
      • The Lower Peninsula has more roads, cities, and factories.
      • The Upper Peninsula is more dependent on lumbering and mining.
      • The Upper Peninsula has higher elevations.
      • The Upper Peninsula is less dependent on manufacturing.
      • They are two distinct land masses

     

    8.    Explain to students that the northern part of the Lower Peninsula is quite different from the southern part of the Lower Peninsula.  Because of these differences, some geographers divide Michigan into three regions: Upper Peninsula, northern part of the Lower Peninsula and southern part of the Lower Peninsula. Share the following criteria that could be used to divide Michigan into three regions:

      • Upper Peninsula: not very populated, short growing season, cold winters, two main land areas, lots of natural resources
      • Northern Lower Peninsula: sandy soil not very good for farming, less people than southern Lower Peninsula, higher elevation than southern Lower Peninsula, big tourist area
      • Southern Lower Peninsula: lots of industry, plenty of land that is good for farming, lower in elevation than other two regions, lots of cities

     

    9.    Explain that a third way to divide Michigan into regions is based on two large land regions of North America: the Interior Plains and the Canadian Shield, a large rocky area. This method of regionalizing Michigan divides Michigan into two regions defined solely by natural features.  Display an overhead transparency of the “Two Natural Regions of Michigan” located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 1, Lesson 9) and color in the two regions on the map. Use the overhead and the information to explore this method of regionalizing Michigan with the class.

     

    10. Explain that there are several other ways to divide Michigan into regions. Show students the “Regions of Michigan Map: located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 1, Lesson 9). This map, created by the Michigan Advantage, divides Michigan into five regions based in general on the economic activities of the regions.

     

    11. Explain that another way to look at the theme of regions is to explore unique regions in Michigan such as the following:

      • The “Fruit Belt” located in the northwestern part of the Lower Peninsula.
      • The “Thumb”
      • Metropolitan Detroit
      • The “Straits” region

    Ask students to describe the unique human and natural (physical) characteristics that make each of these areas a region.

     

    12. Note that the book “Hidden Michigan” listed in the Student Resources provides good information on several regions of Michigan. It is not designed as a read-aloud, but rather a book for students to enjoy independently or with a partner, perhaps at a learning station.

     

    13. Remind students that Michigan is also a part of larger regions. Explain to students that because the United States is such a large country, it would be difficult to study the country one state at a time. Therefore, geographers have found ways to divide the country into regions. One common way is to divide the United States into five regions: Northeast, Southeast, Midwest, Southwest and the West. Display an overhead of the “Five Regions of the U.S.” map located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 1, Lesson 9), and point out the Midwest Region. Using a U.S. map guide students in identifying the other states that are in this region. If time permits, give students a copy of an outline map of the Midwest region such as the one found at the following website: <http://www.eduplace.com/ss/maps/pdf/midwestus_nl.pdf>.

     
    14.  and guide students in labeling the states of the Midwest region. Use Word Card #45, ‘Midwest Region’ with this step.

     

    15. Share the information about the Midwest region located below the “Five Regions of the U.S. Map” and briefly discuss this region using the following questions:

    • Which Midwest states do you think are most like Michigan?
    • What impact do you think the Mississippi River has had on this region?
    • Why do you think the region is also called “The Heartland” of the U.S.?
    • Why do you think the region is also called “The Breadbasket” of the U.S.?

     

    16. Display an overhead of the “Mystery Map” located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 1, Lesson 9).  Explain that this map shows another U.S. region to which Michigan belongs. Ask students to think what the states in this region have in common. Discuss student responses and guide students to the idea that this region is called the “Great Lakes Region.” Each of the states borders one or more of the Great Lakes. Ask students what other area would also be a part of this region besides the states shown. Explain that common characteristics distinguishing this region include: they border the Great Lakes, Great Lakes shipping, Great Lakes issues, and tourism. Use Word Card #46, ‘Great Lakes Region’ with this step.

     

    17. Explain that in fourth grade students will have an opportunity to learn more about different ways the United States can be divided into regions.

     

     

    Assessment

    An assessment has been included in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 1, Lesson 9), in which students identify and describe a way to divide Michigan into regions, one unique region of Michigan and one U.S. region to which Michigan belongs.
     
    Lesson 10:  Describing the Geography of Michigan

     

    Big Ideas of the Lesson

     

     

    ·         To study a place geographers ask questions about the place and try to find answers.

    ·         Geographers explore where a place is located by studying maps.

    ·         Geographers explore what a place is like by studying the natural (physical) and human characteristics of the place.

    ·         Geographers study how people have used the environment of a place by exploring its natural resources.

    ·         Geographers explore how people have changed the environment of the place and how they have adapted to the environment.

    ·         Geographers explore how a place is connected to other places by studying how people, goods and ideas move in and out of the place.

    ·         Geographers explore how a place can be divided into regions and to what regions the place belongs.

     

     

     

     

Last Modified on October 3, 2018