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    Unit 5: How Do Communities Change?

     

     

    Overarching Question:
     
    How Do Communities Change Over Time?

     

     

    Previous Unit:
     
    How Do People Work Together in a Community?
     

     

     

     

    This Unit:
     
    How Do Communities Change?
    Next Unit:
     
    How Can a Citizen Affect a Community?

      

     Big Picture Graphic  

    Questions to Focus Assessment and Instruction:
     
    1. How do historians study the past?
    2. How can an individual impact history?
    3. How do communities change over time?
    Types of Thinking:
     

    Cause and Effect

    Compare/Contrast
    Synthesizing

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Unit Abstract: In this unit students use historical thinking to explore their local community’s past and how communities change over time. The unit begins with a review of historical concepts and ideas from first grade. Using the book The Oxcart Man or a similar literature choice from the economics unit, students identify evidence the story took place in the past. Using a graphic organizer, students compare life in the past with life today. Acting as historians, students investigate various ways we learn about history and begin to gather information about the history of their local community. In a lesson on chronology (sequence) they explore a timeline of local community events. Using The House on Maple Street and A River Ran Wild or similar books, students investigate and compare change over time in a fictional and a non-fictional community. First, students investigate change in the community in The House on Maple Street and then investigate change in their own local community. Students identify historical figures in the local community and explain their contributions and significance in local history. Using the book, A River Ran Wild, students identify how a problem was solved in a community’s past and look for examples of past problems in their own local community. Students are introduced to the concept of historical perspective as they begin to understand why people may view the same historical event in different ways. Finally, using the information about their community’s past which they have gathered throughout the unit, students create a class book describing and illustrating the history of their local community.

     

    Focus Questions:

    1. How do historians study the past?
    2. How can an individual impact history?
    3. How do communities change over time?
     
    Content Expectations:
    1 - H2.0.1:

    Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among past, present, and future using family or school events.

     
     
    1 - H2.0.6:

    Compare life today with life in the past using the criteria of family, school, jobs, or communication.

     
    2 - H2.0.1: Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among years and decades using a timeline of local community events.
     
     
    2 - H2.0.2:

    Explain why descriptions of the same event in the local community can be different.

     

     

    2 - H2.0.3:

    Use an example to describe the role of the individual in creating history.

     

     

    2 - H2.0.4:

    Describe changes in the local community over time (e.g., types of businesses, architecture and landscape, jobs, transportation, population).

     
     
    2 - H2.0.5:

    Identify a problem in a community’s past and describe how it was resolved.

     

     

    2 - H2.0.6:

    Construct a historical narrative about the history of the local community from a variety of sources (e.g., data gathered from local residents, artifacts, photographs).

     
    2 - G5.0.2: Describe positive and negative consequences of changing the physical environment of the local community.

     

    Integrated GLCEs:

    R.NT.02.03:

    Identify and describe characters’ actions and motivations, setting (time and place), problem/solution, and sequence of events. (English Language Arts)

     

    R.CM.02.01:

    Make text-to-self and text-to-text connections and comparisons by activating prior knowledge, connecting personal knowledge, experience, and understanding ofothers to ideas in text through oral and written responses. (English Language Arts)

     

    R.CM.02.02:

    Retell in sequence the major idea(s) and relevant details of grade-level narrative and informational text. (English Language Arts)

     

    W.GN.02.01:

    Write a narrative piece such as realistic fiction, fantasy, or personal narrative depicting major story events, using illustrations to match mood, and containing setting, problem/solution, and sequenced events. (English Language Arts)

     

     

    Key Concepts: artifact, change, chronology, decades, historian, historical evidence, historical narrative, historical perspective, history, past, people, timeline

     

     

    Lesson Sequence:

    Lesson 1: What is History?

    Lesson 2: How Do We Learn About History?

    Lesson 3: What is a Timeline?

    Lesson 4: How Do Communities Change Over Time?

    Lesson 5: How Do People Create the History of a Community?

    Lesson 6: How Have Communities Solved Problems in the Past?

    Lesson 7: Writing About the History of Our Local Community
     
    I Can Statements:
     
    I can describe events that happened in the past and the present.
     
    I can explain what history is.
     
    I can describe ways to learn about the past.
     
    I can create and explain a timeline.
     
    I can describe positive and negative changes in a community over time.
     
    I can tell about a person who has had a role in creating history.
     
    I can write a historical narrative using a variety of sources.
     
     
     
    Resources:
     
    Equipment/Manipulative
    Overhead Projector or Document Camera and Projector
    Chart Paper and Markers
     
    Student Resources:
     
    Bourdeau Waboose, Jan.  SkySisters.  Kids Can Press, 2002.
     

    Brenner, Martha.

    Abe Lincoln’s Hat. New York: Random House for Youth Readers, 1994

     

    Cherry Lynne.

    A River Ran Wild. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1992

     
    Hakes Noble, Trinka.  The Legend of Michigan.  Sleeping Bear Press, 2006.

     

     

    Hall, Donald. The Ox Cart Man. New York: Viking Junior Books, 1979.

     

     

    Pryor, Bonnie. The House on Maple Street. New York: Harper Trophy, 1992.
     
    Walker, Niki.  Life in an Anishinabe Camp.  Crabtree Publishing Company, 2002.
     
    Wargin, Kathy-Jo.  The Voyageur's Paddle.  Sleeping Bear Press, 2007.

     

     

    Teacher Resources:
     
    Duncan Edwards, Pamela. The Bus Ride That Changed History: The Story of Rosa Parks.  Houghton Mifflin Books, 2005.
     
    Herricio, Mark. Fold-And-cut Characters: Famous People in Michigan History. Edco Publishing, 2005
     
    Herron, Carolivia. Always An Olivia: A Remarkable Family History. Kar-Ben Publishing, 2007
     
    Igus, Toyomi. When I was Little. East Orange, NJ: Just Us Books, Inc., 1992
     
    Morgan, Jancy & Dunn, Tom. If This Old Tree Could Talk. Leathers Publishing, 2007

     

     

    Norris, Jill. My Community, A Complete Thematic Unit. Monterey, CA: Evan-Moor Educational Publishers, 1996.
     
    Wilson, Jane. Meema's Memory Quilt: Treasured Stories of Watauga County History.  Parkway Publishing, 1999
     
    Montgomery County Public Schools. Economic and Geography Lessons: The House on Maple Street. 3 July 2008

     

    Resources for Further Professional Knowledge

     

    American Local History Network.

    3 July 2008 <http://www.alhn.org/>.

     

    American Memory Collection

    from the Library of Congress. 3 July 2008>.

     

     

    Henry Ford Museum/Greenfield Village.

    3 July 2008 <http://www.hfmgv.org/>.

     

    History Cooperative

    . 3 July 2008 <https://www.historycooperative.org/>.

     

    The History Place

    . 3 July 2008 <http://www.historyplace.com/>.

     

    The Making of Modern Michigan: Digitizing Michigan’s Hidden Past

    . 3 July 2008>.  

     
    United Streaming Resources:
     
    How Communities Grow and Change, 2nd Edition (20:41 min.)
     
    Lesson 1: What is History?
     
    Lesson 1 Supplemental Materials:
     

     

    Content Expectations:

    1 - H2.0.1:

    Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among past, present, and future using family or school events.

    Integrated GLCEs:

    R.NT.02.03:

    Identify and describe characters’ actions and motivations, setting (time and place), problem/solution, and sequence of events. (English Language Arts)

     

    Key Concepts: historian, historical evidence, history, past

     

    Abstract: In this lesson students learn that history is the study of the past. It begins with a review of the book The Oxcart Man. Students are asked if the story takes place in the past or present. The teacher prods their thinking with the question, “How do you know?” The teacher explains that in order to prove the story takes place in the past they will need to find evidence in the illustrations and words of the story. Using a T-chart labeled “Illustrations” and “Words”, the teacher guides students in identifying evidence that this story took place in the past. Finally, the teacher writes the term ‘historian’ on a board or overhead transparency and explains that students have been working as historians in this activity because they identified evidence supporting their answer that the story took place in the past.

     

    Lesson 2: How Do We Learn About History?

     
    Lesson 2 Supplemental Materials:
     
     
     
    Content Expectations:

    1 - H2.0.6: Compare life today with life in the past using the criteria of family, school, jobs, or communication. 

    Key Concepts: history, historical evidence
     

    Abstract: Building on the definition of ‘historian’ students consider the following question, “How do historians learn about the past?” Students generate a list of different ways people learn about the past including interviewing people, reading books, and looking at old photographs. The teacher explains that students will be gathering evidence about the history of their local community throughout the unit. Students use the three categories of “People”, “Events”, and “Other Information” for the local history investigation. The teacher summarizes what the class has learned using these charts with the three categories. Finally, students are placed in small groups and given two or three photographs depicting a family, building, or event from the community’s past. They explore the photographs and as a group investigate the story these photos tell them about the history of their local community. Students share their investigations with the class.

     

     

    Lesson 3: What is a Timeline?

     

    Lesson 3 Supplemental Materials:
     
     
    Content Expectations:

    2 - H2.0.1:

    Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among years and decades using a timeline of local community events.

     

    Key Concepts: chronology, decades, timeline

     

    Abstract: This lesson expands knowledge of the concept of chronology through an exploration of decades and timelines. Students create a timeline of their own history which includes at least five important events in order. The timelines are displayed on a bulletin board and the teacher explains that a timeline can also show the history of a community. Using a three decade timeline with no more than seven events from the history of a local community, the class considers ideas such as what came first, as well as what happened before and after other events. Information is then added to the history charts that the class began in Lesson Two.

     

     

    Lesson 4: How Do Communities Change Over Time 

     

    Lesson 4 Supplemental Materials:
     
     
    Content Expectations:
     
    2 - H2.0.4:

    Describe changes in the local community over time (e.g., types of businesses, architecture and landscape, jobs, transportation, population).

     
    Integrated GLCEs:

    R.CM.02.02:

    Retell in sequence the major idea(s) and relevant details of grade-level narrative and informational text. (English Language Arts)

     

    Key Concepts: artifact, change,chronology

     

    Abstract: This lesson begins with the teacher showing students an arrowhead (or picture of an arrowhead) and an old broken china cup. In a Pair/Share activity, students discuss what they think these things are. The teacher explains that another way to learn about history is by studying artifacts or objects from the past. Using the book, The House on Maple Street or a similar piece of literature, students determine what the arrowhead and broken cup have to do with the story. The class discusses the role of the two artifacts in the book. Students are given sequencing strips that contain story elements. Students order the strips chronologically showing changes in the community from the story over time. Using a variety of resources such as a guest speaker from a local historical group, photographs, historic maps, and artifacts, the class explores how their own local community has changed over time.

     

     

    Lesson 5: How do People Create the History of a Community?

     

     

    Lesson 5 Supplemental Materials:
     
     
    Content Expectations:
    2 - H2.0.3:

    Use an example to describe the role of the individual in creating history.

     

     

    Integrated GLCEs:
     
    R.NT.02.03: Identify and describe characters’ actions and motivations, setting (time and place), problem/solution, and sequence of events. (English Language Arts)

     

    Key Concepts: history, people

     

    Abstract: In this lesson students explore the role of people in shaping history. It begins with the teacher sharing Abe Lincoln’s Hat or a similar book about an important historical figure. The class discusses how one person can affect history, with a focus on Lincoln’s actions and motivations. The teacher then guides students in understanding that one person can create history in a local community also. Using information gathered from a local historical society, books, etc., students discover someone of significance in the history of their local community. This could be one of the founders of the community, a prominent business person, someone who had a road named after him/her, etc. (Many local historical societies have historians who portray local historic figures.)

     

     

    Lesson 6: How Have Communities Solved Problems in the Past?

     

    Lesson 6 Supplemental Materials:
     
     
    Content Expectations:

    2 - H2.0.2

    Explain why descriptions of the same event in the local community can be different.

     

    2 - H2.0.5

    Identify a problem in a community’s past and describe how it was resolved.

     

    2 - G5.0.2

    Describe positive and negative consequences of changing the physical environment of the local community.

    Integrated GLCEs:

    R.CM.02.01:

    Make text-to-self and text-to-text connections and comparisons by activating prior knowledge, connecting personal knowledge, experience, and understanding of others to ideas in text through oral and written responses. (English Language Arts)

     

    Key Concepts: historical perspective, history, change

     

    Abstract: This lesson begins with a review of the book The House on Maple Street and how it depicts over 300 years of history. Using the book, A River Ran Wild, the teacher guides students in comparing and contrasting the two stories. Students then role play (using a script) a factory owner, a factory worker, and a fisherman. The role play shows each person’s story about the pollution of the river. The class then discusses why each story is different. Next, the class discusses how the factory became a problem in the Nashua River community and how the problem was resolved. Students then list the positive and negative consequences of changing the Nashua River environment. Connecting back to the previous lesson, students discuss how the character of Marion shaped the history of the Nashua River community by working to stop the factory pollution.

     

     

    Lesson 7: Writing About the History of Our Local Community

     

    Lesson 7 Supplemental Materials:
     
     
    Content Expectations:
    2 - H2.0.6:

    Construct a historical narrative about the history of the local community from a variety of sources (e.g., data gathered from local residents, artifacts, photographs).

     
    Integrated GLCEs:
     
    W.GN.02.01: Write a narrative piece such as realistic fiction, fantasy, or personal narrative depicting major story events, using illustrations to match mood, and containing setting, problem/solution, and sequenced events. (English Language Arts)

     

     

     

    Key Concepts: chronology, historical narrative

     

    Abstract: In this culminating lesson, students create a picture book that synthesizes their learning about the history of their local community. Students are directed to the class charts that have been maintained throughout the unit and determine which topics to include in the book. The class sequences in chronological order the chosen topics in the community’s history. From the sequenced topic list, students select one topic of interest and write and illustrate a short historical narrative. Student work is collected and organized into a class picture book.

     

     

     

     

    Last Modified on 1/20/2009 2:08:44 PM

     

Last Modified on October 3, 2018