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    Unit 2: Where is My Community and What is it Like There?

     

     

    Overarching Question:
    How does environment affect a community?

     

     

    Previous Unit:
     
    What is a Community?

     

     

     

     

    This Unit:
     
    Where is My Community and What is it Like There?
    Next Unit:
     
    How do People Live Together in a Community?

     

    Big Picture Graphic 

    Questions to Focus Assessment and Instruction:
     
    1. Where is our community located?
    2. What are some physical and human characteristics of our community?
    3. How do people change the environment in the local community?
    Types of Thinking:
     
    Compare/Contrast
    Descriptive

     

     

      

     

     

     

     

     

    Unit Abstract: In this unit students use the context of their local community to explore the five major themes of geography: location, place, human/environment interaction, movement, and region. The unit begins with an exploration of a variety of maps and a review of map skills covered in kindergarten and grade one. Using a community map, the concept of relative location is introduced. Next, students explore a map of the community and identify various regions such as residential areas and important physical features in the community. Next, students expand their knowledge of the geography of their community as they gather information about physical and human characteristics not of their community. Integrating the second grade science content expectations, students learn about major landforms and bodies of water found on the Earth. Returning to the map of the community, students identify major roads and discuss how roads help to connect places and move goods and people. Synthesizing what they have learned, students construct a simple map of their local community. Using a Venn Diagram, students compare the human and physical characteristics of their community with those of another community. Human environment interaction is introduced as students explore how people interact with the environment and the consequences of changing the environment. Finally, the geographic theme of region is expanded as students learn their community is part of several larger regions including county, state, country, continent, and planet.

     

    Focus Questions:

    1. Where is our community located?

    2. What are the important physical and human characteristics of our community?

    3. How do people change the environment in our local community?

     

    Content Expectations:

    2 - G1.0.1

    : Construct maps of the local community that contain symbols, labels, and legends denoting human and natural characteristics of place.

    2 - G1.0.2:

    Use maps to describe the spatial organization of the local community by applying concepts including relative location and using distance, direction, and scale.

    2 - G2.0.1:

    Compare the physical and human characteristics of the local community with those of another community.

    2 - G2.0.2:

    Describe how the local community is part of a larger region (e.g., county, metropolitan area, state.

    2 - G4.0.1:

    Describe land use in the community (e.g., where people live, where services are provided, where products are made).

    2 - G4.0.2:

    Describe the means people create for moving people, goods, and ideas within the local community.

    2 - G5.0.1:

    Suggest ways people can responsibly interact with the environment in the local community.

    2 - G5.0.2:

    Describe positive and negative consequences of changing the physical environment of the local community.

    Integrated GLCEs

    G.LO.02.07:

    Find and name locations using simple coordinate systems such as maps and first quadrant grids. (Math)

    E.SE.02.21:

    Describe the major landforms of the surface of the Earth (mountains, plains, plateaus, valleys, hills). (Science)

    E.FE.02.22:

    Describe the major bodies of water on the Earth’s surface (lakes, ponds, oceans, rivers, streams). (Science)

    R.CM.02.02:

    Retell in sequence the major idea(s) and relevant details of grade-level narrative and informational text. (English Language Arts)

     

    Key Concepts: community, geography, human characteristics of place, human/environment interaction, land use, location, map, movement, physical characteristics of place, region, transportation

     

    Lesson Sequence:

    Lesson 1: Exploring Maps

    Lesson 2: Where is Our Community and What Is It Like There?

    Lesson 3: Exploring a Map of Our Local Community

    Lesson 4: Making of Map of Our Local Community

    Lesson 5: Transportation and Our Local Community

    Lesson 6: Making a Map of Our Local Community

    Lesson 7: Comparing Our Local Community

    Lesson 8: Consequences of Changing the Environment in a Community

    Lesson 9: To What Other Regions Does My Community Belong?
     
    I Can Statements: 
     
    I can use a map to find and name locations.
     
    I can describe physical and human characteristics of a community.
     
    I can compare the physical and human characteristics of my community to another community.
     
    I can describe how people, goods, and ideas move within a community.
     
    I can suggest ways to interact responsibly with the environment.
     
    I can name my city, county, state, country, and continent.
     

     

    Resources:
     

    Equipment/Manipulatives

    Overhead Projector or Document Camera and Projector

    Chart Paper and Markers
     
    Student Resources:
     
    Block, Marta Segal.

    Mapping Your Community (first guide to Maps). New York: Heinemann, 2008

     
    Boothroyd, Jennifer. People and the Environment. Lerner Classroom, 2007.

     

    Chesanow, Neil. Where Do I Live? New York: Barron’s Educational Series, 1995.

     

     

    Fox, Guy. Washington D.C. Children’s Map. New York: Guy Fox Publishing, 2007.

     

     

    Geisert, Bonnie and Arthur. Desert Town. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2001

     

     

    - - -. Mountain Town. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 2000

     

     

    - - -. Prairie Town. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1998

     

     

    - - -. River Town. New York: Houghton Mifflin, 1999

     

     

    Madden, Don. The Wartville Wizard. New York: Aladdin Books, 1993

     

     

    Rabe. Tish. There’s a Map on My Lap: All About Maps. New York: Random House Books for Young Readers, 2002.

     

    Teacher Resources:
     
    Artell, Mike & Schiller, Pam. The Earth and Me: Grades PreK-2: Teacher Resource. Good Year Books, 1997
     
    Ashcroft, Minnie. Marvelous Map Activities for Young Learners: Easy Reproducible Activities that Introduce Important Map and Geography Skills, and Help Kids Explore their Neighborhood, Community and Beyond. New York: Scholastic, 2002.
     

     

     

    How Communities Are Different.

    3 July 2008 <http://www.lessonplanspage.com/SSCommunityDifferencesVenn3.htm.

     

     

    Kids and Community

    . 3 July 2008 < http://www.planning.org/kidsandcommunity>.

     

    Moore. Jo E.

    Beginning Geography: Landforms & Bodies of Water (Beginning Geography). New York: Evan-Moor, 1993

     

    Norris, Jill. My Community, A Complete Thematic Unit. Monterey, CA: Evan-Moor Educational Publishers, 1996.
     

    Wade. Mary Dodson.

    Map Scales (Rookie Read-About Geography). New York: Children’s Press, 2003.

    Resources for Further Professional Knowledge

     

    National Council for the Social Studies.

    3 July 2008 <http://www.ncss.org/>.

     

     

    Social Studies Lesson Plans and Resources

    . 3 July 2008 <http://www.csun.edu/~hcedu013/>.

     

     

    Strategies for Teaching Social Studies

    . 3 July 2008 < http://www.udel.edu/dssep/strategies.htm>.

     

     

    Teaching Social Studies

    . 3 July 2008

     

     

     

    Lesson 1: Exploring Maps

      

    Content Expectations:

     

    2 - G1.0.2:

    Use maps to describe the spatial organization of the local community by applying

     

     

    concepts including relative location and using distance, direction, and scale.

     

    Integrated GLCEs

    G.LO.02.07:

    Find and name locations using simple coordinate systems such as maps and first

     

    quadrant grids. (Math)

     

     

    Key Concepts: geography, map

     

    Abstract:  In this lesson students explore a variety of maps as a precursor to an exploration of a map of their local community in a later lesson. The lesson begins with a discussion of There’s a Map on My Lap! or a similar book. Students then learn about significant features of maps including a title, symbols, and a legend/map key. Then, in small groups or at a learning center they explore several maps such as grid maps, a map of their school, a mall map, a map of an airport, and a map of Michigan.

     

     

     

    Sequence:
     

    1.    Write the following question on chart paper or a board and ask students to write or draw an answer in their social studies journal: What is a map? Have students first share their journal work with a partner and then with the large group.

     

    2.    Discuss how various students answered the question and guide students in identifying common ideas such as the following:

    ·         A map shows a place.

    ·         A map is a drawing of a place.

    ·         A map shows what a place looks like from up above. (Bird’s eye view)

    ·         A map helps us find the location of a place.

    Using Word Card #1, review the definition of a map.

     

    3.    Display the “Classroom Map” located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 2, Lesson 1) but be sure to cover the top part of the map which includes the title and the map key at the top. Ask students what kind of place the map is showing.  Discuss student responses. Then, ask students what they think the black circles on the map are. Discuss student responses. Note that without the title and key students are likely to have difficulty in understanding the map.

     

    4.    Uncover the top of the page and point out the title of the map (“Classroom Map.”) Explain that a title is a very important part of a map. It helps people understand what kind of place the map shows. Point out the map key and share Word Card #2. Guide students in understanding that a map key makes a map much easier to understand. In other words, it is the ‘key’ to understanding a map.  Using the key, guide students in identifying various parts of the classroom including the wastebaskets which are symbolized by the black circles.

     

    5.    Using Word Card #3, discuss the term ‘symbol.’ Ask students why they think a black circle was used on the map to show a ‘wastebasket.’ Point out the symbol used for a flag on the map. Ask students why they think this symbol was used instead of a flag with fifty stars and lots of stripes. Guide students in understanding that symbols are simple pictures that stand for other things. Note that as an enrichment activity for this lesson, you could use a demonstration computer with students to create different kinds of classroom arrangements and maps by accessing this website: http://teacher.scholastic.com/tools/class_setup/\

     

    6.    Share a map of your school with students. Explain that these types of maps have a title but often do not include a map key with symbols. Ask students why they think this is true. Guide students in understanding that school maps show the location of rooms and special places like the library. These places are labeled on the map so a key is not needed.

     

    7.    Display the “Treeville Map” located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 2, Lesson 1). Guide students in identifying the title, the map key, and the symbols on the map key. To help students begin to understand the concept of map scale, point out that the map of the classroom and the map of the Treeville community are about the same size. Then, pose the following question: Are the classroom and Treeville really the same size? Discuss student responses and guide them in understanding that maps can be of the same size but show places that are very different in size. Note that at this point in the lesson you may even wish to show a map of the United States printed on 8 ½ by 11 paper or in a book to reinforce the concept of scale.

     

    8.    Review relative location words that students are familiar with such as ‘next to’, ‘near’, ‘left’, etc. Using the Treeville community map, ask students to identify the location of different things in the community using these words. The following are examples:

    ·         The school is next to a house.

    ·         The park is near the river.

    ·         The fire station is right of the city hall.

     

    9.    Using Word Card #4 and the Treeville Map, introduce the cardinal direction words ‘north’, ‘south’, ‘east’ and ‘west’. Explain that these words are another way to describe the location of places. Guide students in using cardinal directions to locate specific places in Treeville. The following are examples:

    ·         The fire station is east of city hall.

    ·         The factories are north of city hall.

    ·         The stores are south of city hall

    ·         The school is west of city hall.

    Note that this introduction to cardinal directions is only meant as an awareness level activity. The concept will be covered in depth in grade three.

     

    10. Using small groups or a learning center, provide an opportunity for students to explore a variety of maps. Note that four maps have been included in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 2, Lesson 1)for you to use for this activity. These include a map of Detroit Metro Airport, a map of the 100 Acre Woods from Winnie the Pooh, a map of the Disney Resort, and a map of a mall. You may also wish to obtain a Michigan highway map from the following website: http://www.michigan.gov/mdot/0,1607,7-151-9622_11033_11151---,00.html

     

    11. This lesson can be supplemented with books relating to maps such as “There’s a Map on My Lap: All About Maps” or “Follow that Map! A First Book of Mapping Skills.” Both are referenced in the Student Resources. In addition, the United States Geological Survey website has an excellent packet of primary level classroom materials entitled “Map Adventures.” This includes seven lesson plans, activity sheets and 15 reproducible sections of a park map that can be made into a poster. The materials can be found at: http://egsc.usgs.gov/isb/pubs/teachers-packets/mapadventures/illust1.html

     
     

    Lesson 2: Where is My Community and What Is It Like There?

     

    Content Expectations:

     

    2 - G1.0.2:

    Use maps to describe the spatial organization of the local community by applying concepts including relative location and using distance, direction, and scale.

     

     

    Key Concepts: geography, location, map

     

    Abstract: In this lesson students are introduced to the concept of relative location and then use their knowledge to describe the relative location of their local community. The lesson begins with the teacher asking students to describe their relative location of objects and people in the classroom by using words such as ‘near’, ‘next to’, ‘left of’, etc. Students then use relative location to describe the location of different parts of the school building relative to their classroom. Then, using a map of Michigan the teacher guides students in describing the relative location of their local community.
     
    Sequence:
     

    1.    Write the following question on chart paper: Where is it? Review the idea that many different kinds of direction words can be used to answer this question. Show students the map of Treeville which was used in the previous lesson. Guide them in making a list of the relative location words they used with this map. Note that these include: near, next to, by, left of, north of, across from. Write the words they identify on the chart paper underneath the question. Using Word Card #5, review the term ‘location’ which was introduced in Unit One.

     

    2.    Point to various objects in the room and ask students to describe the location of each object. As new relative location words are used by students add them to the list you began in Lesson one. When students are comfortable with this activity and the use of relative location words, alter the activity by giving them a description of the location of an object in the room and having them guess which object you are referring to. For example say: this object is near the door, above the computer and right of the calendar.

     

    3.    Using the map of the classroom from Lesson One, have students describe the location of various objects in the classroom. Note that you may wish to use this activity as a formative assessment.

     

    4.    Next, describe the location of a specific student in the classroom and ask students to identify the student. For example say: this person is near the back of the room, at Table 4 and between John and Marcie. Repeat the activity with two or three more students. Then, have students describe their own relative location in the room in their social studies journal. Collect the journals and read one of the descriptions. Have students try to guess who wrote the description. Repeat the process with two or three more students.

     

    5.    To reinforce the concept of relative location, guide students in describing the location of different parts of the school building relative to their classroom. Note that you may find it beneficial to use a school map for this activity or even take a ‘field trip’ around the school.

     

    6.    Display the map of Treeville again and explain that the map can be used to find the location of various things in the community such as the fire station and the river. However, it is not helpful in knowing the location of the community itself. Ask students what kind of a map would be needed to answer the question: Where is Treeville? Discuss student responses and guide students in understanding that a map showing a bigger area would be needed. Explain that this could be a county map or a state map.

     

    7.    Show students the map of Michigan located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 2, Lesson 2). Note that as an alternative you may wish to use a large highway map of Michigan or a set of Michigan desk maps borrowed from a third grade teacher. As a way of connecting back to grade one, guide students in differentiating between land and water on the map.  Point out that our state has two different parts, called peninsulas. Tell students that next year in third grade they will learn all about the state of Michigan.

     

    8.    Explain that this map shows several different communities that are located in the state of Michigan. If your community is labeled on the map, point it out to students. If it is not labeled, identify its location for students and add a ‘dot’ and label for your community. Then, guide students in describing the relative location of your local community. As you come up with descriptions write them on chart paper. Try to keep your descriptions broad such as: our community is near a river, our community is near the community of Flint, our community is between the communities of Lansing and Port Huron, our community is near the middle of the state, etc.

     

    Note that the use of cardinal direction is only introduced at an awareness level in second grade. It is not necessary to use cardinal direction words in describing the relative location of your local community in Michigan. However, depending on your students, you may wish to include cardinal direction location in the list you create in Step 8. For example: Our community is in the south part of Michigan or our community is in the east part of Michigan
     

     

     

    Lesson 3: Exploring a Map of Our Local Community

     

    Content Expectations:

     

    2 - G1.0.2:

    Use maps to describe the spatial organization of the local community by applying concepts including relative location and using distance, direction, and scale.

     
    2 - G4.0.1: Describe land use in the community (e.g., where people live, where services are provided, where products are made).
     

     

    Key Concepts: community, geography, land use, location, map, region

     

    Abstract: This lesson begins with an exploration of a map of a well-known community such as Guy Fox’s Washington D.C. Children’s Map. Next, students explore a map of their own community and identify places or regions where people live (residential), places where people shop (commercial), places where people work (manufacturing), etc. Students also identify physical and human characteristics such as rivers as well as features such as parks, hospitals, and libraries.

     

    Sequence:
     

    1.    Display the map of “Treeville” located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 2, Lesson 3). Note that this map was introduced in Lesson One of this unit.  Review the map key with students. Pose the following question: Do you see any pattern in the way things are arranged in Treeville? Discuss student responses. Then, point out the stores in Treeville and guide students in understanding that they are located together in a certain part of Treeville. Repeat the process with the houses, the factory, and the park.

     

    2.    Explain that often communities are divided into places or areas where people do different things. These different areas or regions of a community can be found on a map of the community. Share the following types of places:

    ·         Places where people live.

    ·         Places where people shop.

    ·         Places where people work.

    ·         Places where people play.

     

    3.    Using Word Card #6, review the term ‘natural characteristics’ which was introduced in Unit One. Make a simple T-chart on chart paper and label “Natural” on one side of it. Guide students in identifying the natural characteristics of Treeville and list on the T-Chart. Note that these include trees, a river, a lake, and grass.

     

    4.    Ask students what they think will go on the other side of the T-chart. Discuss their responses. Then, using Word Card #7, review the term ‘human characteristics.’ Guide students in identifying the human characteristics of Treeville. Note that these include the streets and the various buildings. Summarize what has been covered in the lesson so far by discussing how a map of a community can be used to locate different places in a community where people do different things. It can also be used to locate important natural and human characteristics of a community.

     

    5.    Display the “Map of Waterford, Michigan” located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 2, Lesson 3).  Ask students to turn and talk with a partner about how this community differs from Treeville. Give pairs time to talk. Then, have pairs share ideas in the large group. Note that possible answers include:

    ·         Waterford is much larger than Treeville.

    ·         Waterford has more lakes than Treeville.

    ·         Waterford has more roads than Treeville.

    ·         Waterford has more parks and factories than Treeville.

     

    6.    Guide students in identifying places in Waterford where people work, shop, and play. Pose the following question: Places where people live are not shown on the Waterford map. Why do you think this is?  Discuss student responses. Guide students in understanding that in a large community like Waterford people probably live in many different places in the community so it would be hard to show them on the map. Ask students to identify probable places where people would live in Waterford. Discuss student responses. Note that possible answers include near lakes, along small roads not the big roads, near the rivers, etc.

     

    7.    Using a T-chart like the one you created in Step 4 guide students in identifying natural and human characteristics of Waterford. Note that these include:

    ·         Natural: lakes, rivers, trees in the parks

    ·         Human: Government offices, factories, stores, an airport, roads, a railroad.

     

    8.    Obtain a map of your local community from your local planning department or other division of your local government. Note that many community websites have maps available to download. Repeat the process used to explore the maps of Treeville and Waterford to explore a map of your own local community. Guide students in first identifying different regions of your community such as regions where people shop. Then, create a T-Chart and identify natural and human characteristics shown on the map. Add any new information discovered from the map exploration to the “What is Special about our Community?” chart you began in Lesson 5 of Unit 1.

     
     
    Lesson 4: Making a Map of Our Local Community

     

    Content Expectations:

     

    2 - G2.0.1:

    Compare the physical and human characteristics of the local community with those of another community.

     

    Integrated GLCEs

    E.SE.02.21: Describe the major landforms of the surface of the Earth (mountains, plains, plateaus, valleys, hills). (Science)

     

     

    E.FE.02.22:

    Describe the major bodies of water on the Earth’s surface (lakes, ponds, oceans, rivers, streams). (Science)

     

    Key Concepts: community, geography, huma characteristics of place, physical characteristics of place

     

    Abstract: In this lesson that integrates social studies and science content expectations, students explore major landforms and bodies of water on the Earth’s surface using photographs and illustrations from post cards, picture books, and posters such as those found in the Evan-Moor book Beginning Geography: Landforms & Bodies of Water. They then apply this knowledge to their own local community by exploring the physical and human characteristics of the community. Students classifying a set of cards containing labels such as ‘house’, ‘bridge’, ‘river’, ‘sidewalk’, ‘lake’, ‘tree’ according to whether they are physical or human characteristics. Students then refer back to the map of the local community or the “What Makes my Community Special?” chart used in previous lessons, and identify physical and human characteristics of their community.

     

     

    Sequence:

    1.    Review the community maps used so far in this unit including the Treeville map, the map of Waterford, Michigan, and the map of your local community used in the previous lesson. In addition, review the important features of a map including a title, labels, and a map key. Explain that in this lesson you will be working together to create your own map of your local community using what you have learned about maps and what you have learned about your local community.

     

    2.    On large chart paper create an outline map of your community using the map of your local community from Lesson 3 as your guide. Using the T-chart of natural and human characteristics of your local community which you created in Lesson 3, the “What Makes our Community Special” chart created in Unit 1, and the map of your local community explored in Lesson 3; guide students in identifying the features they would like to include on the map of their local community. Guide students in limiting the features to a reasonable number. In addition, encourage them to select the most important features of their local community. Make a list of the features they have identified.

     

    3.    Add four or five significant roads to your community map and create a symbol for roads on your map key. This helps create a method for placement of other features you want to add to the map. Next, add your school to the map and create a symbol for a school on the key.

     

    4.    Add in significant natural features such as a river, a pond, a lake, etc. Add relevant symbols to the map key as you add these features.

     

    5.    Next, using the list of features of your community you identified in Step 2, add the significant human features to the map as well as relevant symbols to your map key. Use the map of your local community from Lesson 3 to guide placement of features. Note that as an alternative you can have pairs of students create small drawings on squares of paper to represent various features of your community such as a fire station, a town hall, a mall, a park, etc. These can be glued to the map in the appropriate place.

     

    6.    Add a title to your map. Ask students to review the map and recommend any additions they would like to see. Make additions as necessary.

     

    7.    As a culminating activity, give each student a small outline map of your local community and make an overhead of the map. Guide students in creating a very simple map of the local community based on the one you have generated as a class. This simple map might include just two main roads, your school, one major natural feature and three major human features. Have students create a map key for their simplified map.

     

    Lesson 5: Transportation and Our Local Community

     

    Content Expectations:

     

    2 - G4.0.2:

    Describe the means people create for moving people, goods, and ideas within the local community.

     

     

    Key Concepts: movement, transportation

     

    Abstract: In this lesson students are introduced to the concept of movement in the context of how places are connected together through transportation networks. The lesson begins with a review of the local community map as students identify major roads in the local community. Using a Think/Pair/Share activity students investigate the question, “Why are roads important in a community?” The students generate list of reasons roads are important including the following: roads help move people from one place to another, roads help connect our local community to other communities, roads help move products from one place to another. The class creates a three-column chart labeled “Land”, “Air”, and “Water”. The students classify various methods of transporting people and goods including airplanes, boats, trains, buses, taxis, and feet. They revisit the chart and indicate which modes of transportation/movement are present in their local community.

     

     Sequence:

     

     

    1.    Pose the following question and ask students to write or draw an answer in their social studies journal:  How did you get to school today?  Give students time to complete an answer and then  collect data on chart paper recording how many walked, how many came by bus, how many came in a car, how many came on a bike, etc. Note that later in the day you may wish to integrate in a math activity into this lesson by creating a class pictograph summarizing the data.

     

    2.    Using Word Card #8, review the term ‘transportation’ which was introduced in Unit 1. Explain that the data they gathered in Step 1 reflects different kinds of transportation used to move people from place to place. Explain that in this lesson they will learn more about the importance of transportation in communities. Label a large sheet of chart paper: Transportation: How are people and things moved from place to place? Transfer the forms of transportation identified in Step 1 to the chart paper.

     

    3.    Display the map of your local community created in the previous lesson. Guide students in identifying the roads you included on the map. Ask students to think of one reason roads are important in communities. Then, have them share their reason with a partner and then in the large group. Note that possible answers include:

    ·         Roads help move people from one place to another in a community.

    ·         Roads help connect our local community to other communities.

    ·         Roads help move goods from one place to another, for example from a factory to a store or from a farm to a store.

    ·         People take roads to get to work.

    ·         Roads connect places in a community together.

     

    4.    Ask students what forms of transportation use the roads in their community. Make a list of their ideas on chart paper and encourage them to refer to the data they collected in Step 1 to add more ideas to their list.  Note that common examples include cars, trucks, taxis, and buses. Add the various modes of transportation to the “Transportation Chart” you began in Step 2.

     

    5.    Display the Waterford Map which was used in previous lessons and has been included in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 2, Lesson 5). Guide students in identifying major roads in this community. Then, explain that not all forms of transportation need roads.  Challenge students to find examples of other forms of transportation on the Waterford map that do not require roads. Guide them in identifying the airport and the railroad tracks. Add ‘airplanes’ and ‘trains’ to the ‘Transportation Chart” you have been creating. Make sure to guide students in understanding that airplanes and trains help connect different communities but are not often used to move people and goods within a community.

     

    6.    Display the book “I Live in Brooklyn” or the alternative book you used for Lesson 2 in Unit 1. Show students the illustrations and guide them in identifying additional forms of transportation and add them to the “Transportation Chart.” Note that possible additions include boats, ferries, and subways.

     

    7.    Create a three-column chart labeled ‘land’, ‘air’, and ‘water.’ Guide students in classifying the various modes of transportation they have listed on their “Transportation Chart” and list the modes in the appropriate column on the chart. Next, ask students to ‘brainstorm’ additional forms of land, water, and air transportation to add to the three-column chart. If necessary, ask prompting questions such as “Could people fly in something other than an airplane?” Note that a three-column chart showing sample answers has been included in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 2, Lesson 5) for you to use for reference.

     

    8.    Guide students in identifying on the three-column chart the modes of transportation which are present in their own local community and circle them on the chart.

     

    9.   For a multicultural connection share the book “On the Go” by Ann Morris or a similar book and add any new forms of transportation to your three-column chart.

     

     

    Lesson 6: Landforms and Bodies of Water
     

    Lesson Abstract: In this lesson that integrates social studies and science content expectations, students explore major landforms and bodies of water on the Earth’s surface using photographs and illustrations from picture books, posters and other resources. This provides an important foundational piece for the study of Michigan geography in grade 3 and U.S. geography in grade 4. They begin by identifying natural characteristics of their own community.

     

     

    Content Expectations:
     

    2 - G2.0.1: Compare the physical and human characteristics of the local community with those of another community.

     

    Integrated GLCEs:

     

    E.SE.02.21:   Describe the major landforms of the surface of the Earth (mountains, plains, plateaus, valleys, hills). (Science)

                        E.FE.02.22:    Describe the major bodies of water on the Earth’s surface (lakes,
                        ponds, oceans, rivers, streams). (Science).
     

    Key Concepts: geography, physical characteristics of place

     

     

     

    1.    Using the Word Cards for ‘landforms’ and ‘bodies of water’ introduce these terms. Then, using the maps of Treeville, Waterford, and your local community guide students in identifying landforms and bodies of water show on these maps.

     

    2.    Display the “Landforms” chart located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 2, Lesson 6), covering all but the first landform (mountain). Discuss the definition of mountain and guide students in describing the photograph of the mountain on the chart. Repeat this process for the other three landforms, uncovering one at a time. Give students Word Cards #11 - #14. Ask students which, if any, of the landforms on the chart can be found in or near their local community. Note that additional photographs of landforms can be found at the following website: http://www.edu.pe.ca/southernkings/landforms.htm

     

    3.    Display the “Bodies of Water” chart located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 2, Lesson 6, covering all but the first body of water (ocean). Using a globe, point out Earth’s oceans and discuss their characteristics such as large size and salty water. Uncover the section of the chart with the information for lakes. Using the globe point out various lakes on Earth beginning with the Great Lakes.

     

    4.    Uncover the section of the chart with the information on ponds. Hand the globe to a student and ask the student to find a pond on the globe. Guide students in understanding that the Earth is so big and ponds are so small that a globe cannot show anything as small as a pond. Briefly discuss ponds and lakes using the following questions:

    ·         Where would you most likely find a sailboat, on a pond or a lake? Why?

    ·         What kinds of animals might you find in or near a lake?

    ·         What kinds of animals might you find in or near a pond?

    ·         How might a lake or pond benefit a community?

     

    5.    Uncover the final section of the chart and discuss the definition and characteristics of a river. Explain that many communities can be found along rivers. Ask students why they think this is true. Possible answers include that rivers provide transportation, food, recreation, etc. Give students Word Cards #15 - #18. Ask students which, if any, of the bodies of water on the chart can be found in or near their local community

     

    6.    Place students in pairs and give each pair a copy of the two sheets of “Landforms and Bodies of Water” cards located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 2, Lesson 6). Have students cut apart the thirty-two separate cards. Explain that partners should work together to put the cards into groups of four. Each group should contain a name card (like ‘mountain’), a definition card, a picture card, and a simple drawing card. Give students time to sort their cards into groups. Circulate around the room helping pairs to correct mistakes. If desired one of the following additional activities can be used to supplement this step:

    ·         Have students create a chart on large drawing paper by gluing the groups of landforms and bodies of water to the paper.

    ·         Have students create a simple “Landforms and Bodies of Water book” by gluing each set of four cards to a small sheet of paper, creating a title page, and stapling the 9 pages together.

     

    7.    Note that at this point in the lesson you may wish to use some of the activity pages from the resource “Land Forms and Bodies of Water” listed in the Student Resources. This resource includes a very useful poster as well as several good activities.

     

    8.    Display the photographs of San Francisco located in the Supplemental Materials (Unit 2, Lesson 6). Ask students to identify the landform that is most evident in the photos. Guide students in understanding that San Francisco has many hills. Ask students how hills might impact a community. Note that possible answers include that hills provide challenges in constructing roads and buildings, that hills can provide challenges to different types of transportation such as bikes and feet and that hills can provide scenic places.

     

    9.    Briefly discuss how other landforms and bodies of water might impact communities. For example, how might being located in a valley impact a community? 

     

     

     

    Lesson 7: Comparing Our Local Community

     

    Content Expectations:

     

    2 - G2.0.1:

    Compare the physical and human characteristics of the local community with those of another community.

     

     

    Key Concepts: community, geography, human characteristics of place, physical characteristics of place

     

    Abstract: In this lesson students compare their local community to another community or a community from a book such as Mountain Town, Desert Town, River Town or Prairie Town. The lesson begins with a review of how to complete a Venn Diagram. Students identify the major physical and human characteristics of selected community. Working in cooperative groups, the students complete and share a Venn Diagram comparing their local community to another community.
     
    Lesson 8: Consequences of Changing the Environment in a Community

     

    Content Expectations:

    2- G5.0.1:

    Suggest ways people can responsibly interact with the environment in the local community.

    2 - G5.0.2:

    Describe positive and negative consequences of changing the physical environment of the local community.

    Integrated GLCEs:

    R.CM.02.02: Retell in sequence the major idea(s) and relevant details of grade-level narrative and informational text. (English Language Arts)

     

     

     

    Key Concepts: human/environment interaction

     

    Abstract: In this lesson students explore how people modify the environment and the positive and negative consequences of those choices. Using photographs of plowed fields, cut-down forests, or new construction, students identify examples of modification in their community. Using a book such as The Wartville Wizard, students work in pairs to retell in sequence the major ideas and relevant details of the book. Then, in a class discussion they describe how the characters in the book modified their environment and what happened as a result of these changes. Students are introduced to the term consequence and understand that there are positive and negative consequences for actions. Students then return to the examples of environmental modification from the book and evaluate the consequences as positive or negative. (For example,a positive consequence might be that the area can now be used for new houses for people. A negative consequence might be the loss of a habitat for wildlife.) Finally, the teacher guides a discussion of the consequences of changing the environment using a specific example from the local community.

     

     

     

    Lesson 9: To What Other Regions Does My Community Belong?

     

    Content Expectations:

     

    2 - G2.0.2:

    Describe how the local community is part of a larger region (e.g., county, metropolitan area, state).

     

     

    Key Concepts: region

     

    Abstract: In this lesson students expand their understanding of the geographic theme of region. Students review regions of their school and regions of their community such as residential regions and shopping regions. Students investigate the question, “To what other regions does my community belong”? Working cooperatively, students list three answers to the question. Students then share their ideas as the teacher makes a class list on chart paper. Class discussion continues to add to the list ensuring the list includes the following: a county, Michigan (state), the United States (country), North America (continent), the world. (Note: by using Google Earth, students can visually see these regions as the view expands.) The teacher explains any unfamiliar terms such as ‘county.’ Using word cards, they sequence them in order from smallest to largest. Students are given a handout with six concentric circles, including the name of their local community in the center circle. Using an overhead of the same sheet the teacher guides students in labeling the circles with the name of their county, state, country, continent, and word. Finally, the teacher reads the book Where Do I Live? or a similar book. As an optional activity students create their own “Here’s Where I Live” book.

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Last Modified on 1/20/2009 2:08:44 PM

     

Last Modified on October 3, 2018