• Unit 5:  What is a Good Citizen?

     

    Overarching Question:
     

     

    How do citizens shape a community? 

     

    Previous Unit:

     

     How Do We Learn About the Past?

     

     

    This Unit:
     
       What is a Good Citizen?
    Next Unit:
     
     Grade 2  
     Local Communities

     

    Big Picture Graphic  

    Questions to Focus Assessment and Instruction:
    1. Why do we follow rules and respect authority?
    2. How can citizens work together to solve issues?

    3. What are some important symbols of our country and why are they important?

    Types of Thinking:
    Non-linguistic representations
    Brainstorming
    Problem solving
    Analysis 

     

     
     

     

    Unit Abstract:  In this unit school is used as the context for teaching students foundational concepts relating to citizenship. As students explore characteristics of a good citizen, they work to complete a class graphic organizer summarizing what they are learning. Students then use the characteristics of agood citizen to individually create booklets describing roles and responsibilities of good citizens.The unit begins with a lesson in which students explore reasons for school rules as well as reasons citizens need to follow rules. Next, students are introduced to the civics concepts of power and authority as they compare ways principals use power with authority and ways bullies use power without authority. The next lesson explores the connections between good citizenship and fairness as students react to life without recess, explore an example of informational text and then work in pairs to resolve a conflict in a fair way. The school responsibilities of a good citizen are explored in the next lesson, connecting back to the discussion on the importance of following rules from Lesson One. Students then apply several of the concepts and skills they have been learning by working together to analyze and resolve a school problem, or issue such as bullying. In a final lesson, students expand their understanding of citizenship as they explore the concept of patriotism and identify important national symbols and tell why they are important.

     

     

    Focus Questions:
     
    1.  Why do we follow rules and respect authority?
    2.  How can citizens work together to solve issues?
    3. What are some important symbols of our country and why are they important?

     

    Content Expectations:

    1 - C1.0.1: Identify some reasons for rules in school (e.g., provide order, predictability, and safety).

    1 - C1.0.2: Give examples of the use of power with authority in school (e.g., principal, teacher or bus driver enforcing school rules).

    1 - C1.0.3: Give examples of the use of power without authority in school (e.g., types of bullying, taking cuts in line).

     

     

    1 - C2.0.1: Explain how decisions can be made or how conflicts might be resolved in fair and just ways (e.g., majority rules).

     

    1 - C2.0.2:  Identify important symbols of the United States of America (e.g., Statue of Liberty, Uncle Sam, White House, Bald Eagle) 

    1 - C1.0.1: Identify some reasons for rules in school (e.g., provide order, predictability, and safety).  

    1 - C1.0.2: Give examples of the use of power with authority in school (e.g., principal, teacher or bus driver enforcing school rules).

     

    1 - C1.0.3: Give examples of the use of power without authority in school (e.g., types of bullying, taking cuts in line).

     

     

    1 - C2.0.1: Explain how decisions can be made or how conflicts might be resolved in fair and just ways (e.g., majority rules).

     

    1 - C2.0.2: Identify important symbols of the United States of America (e.g., Statue of Liberty,Uncle Sam, White House, Bald Eagle).

    1 - C5.0.1: Describe some responsibilities people have at home and at school (e.g., taking careof oneself, respect for the rights of others, following rules, getting along with others).
     
    1 - C5.0.2: Identify situations in which people act as good citizens in the school community (e.g.,thoughtful and effective participation in the school decisions, respect for the rights of others, respect for rule of law, voting, volunteering, compassion, courage, honesty).
     
    Key Concepts:
    authority
    bullying
    citizen
    conflict
    country
    fairness
    patriotism
    power
    public issues
    responsibility
    rules
    symbol
    United States of America

     

     

    Lesson Sequence:

    Lesson 1  A Good Citizen Follows Rules
    Lesson 2:  A Good Citizen Respects Authority
    Lesson 3:  A Good Citizen is Fair
    Lesson4:  A Good Citizen is Responsible
    Lesson 5:  Good Citizen Helps to Resolve School Issues
    Lesson 6:  A Good Citizen Honors the United States of America
     
    I Can Statements:
     
    I can tell reasons why school rules are important.
     
    I can describe ways students act as good citizens in school.
     
    I can name the leaders in our school and describe how they help our school.
     
    I can create ideas to solve problems.
     
    I can describe important symbols in the United States.
     

     

     

    Resources: Equipment/Manipulatives
    Art Paper and Drawing Materials Such as Markers and Crayons
    Chart Paper and Markers
    Overhead Projector or Document Camera and Projector
     
    Student Resources:
     
    Being a Leader by Cassie Mayer,  Heinamann Ed. Books  2007
     
    Good Citizen Sarah by Virginia Kroll and Nancy Cote,  Albert Whitman & Co.  2007
     
    Following Rules by Cassie Mayer,  Heinamann Ed. Books 2007
     
    Being Responsible By Cassie Mayer,  Heinamann Ed. Books 2007
     
    American Citizenship (DVD)  V6151 
     

    Brimner, Larry Dane. School Rules. (Rookie Choices Series). New York: Scholastic, 2002.

     

     

    Center for Civic Education. Fair Bears Learn About Justice (Foundations of DemocracySeries). California: Center for Civic Education, 1998.

     

     

    Orb and Effy Learn About Authority (Foundations of Democracy Series). California: Center for Civic Education, 1999.

     
    The Zookeeper Learns About Responsibility (Foundations ofDemocracy Series). California: Center for Civic Education, 1998.
     
    Douglass, Lloyd. The Statue of Liberty (Welcome Books American Symbols Series). New York: Rosen Books, 2003.
     
    Douglass, Lloyd. The Bald Eagle (Welcome Books American Symbols Series). New York: Rosen Books, 2003.
     
    Douglass, Lloyd. The American Flag (Welcome Books American Symbols Series). New York: Rosen Books, 2003.
     
    Douglass, Lloyd. The White House (Welcome Books American Symbols Series). New York: Rosen Books, 2003.
     
    Douglass, Lloyd. The Liberty Bell (Welcome Books American Symbols Series). New York: Rosen Books, 2003.
     

     

    The Bald Eagle (Welcome Books American Symbols Series). New York: Rosen Books, 2003.

     

    The White House (Welcome Books, American Symbols Series). New York: Rosen Books, 2003.

    Finn, Carrie.  Kids Talk About Fairness. New York: Picture Window
     
    Mayer, Cassie. Being Fair (Citizenship Series). Chicago, IL; Heinemann Raintree, 2008.

     

     

     

    Being Responsible (Citizenship Series). Chicago, IL; Heinemann Raintree, 2008.

     

    Meiners, Cheri J. Know and Follow Rules. Minneapolis, MN: Free Spirit Publishing, 2005.

     

     

     

    Naylor, Phyllis Reynolds. King of the Playground. New York: Aladdin Paperbacks, 1994.

     

     

     

    O’Neill, Alexis. The Recess Queen. New York: Scholastic, 2002.

     

     

     

    Teacher Resources:

     

    American Bald Eagle Information. 3 September 2008  http://www.baldeagleinfo.com
     

     

     

    Statue of Liberty National Monument. 3 September 2008 http://www.nps.gov/stli

     

     

    Center for Civic Education 3 September 2008 http://www.civiced.org/index.php?page=lesson_plans 

     

    Citizenship Education. 3 September 2008

     

     

    http://www.ecs.org/html/educationIssues/CitizenshipEducation/CitEdDB_intro.asp.

     

     

    National Council for the Social Studies. 3 September 2008  http://www.ncss.org

     

    Social Studies Lesson Plans and Resources. 3 September 2008

     

     

    http://www.csun.edu/~hcedu013/.

     

     

    Strategies for Teaching Social Studies. 3 September 2008

     

     

    http://www.udel.edu/dssep/strategies.htm.

     

     

    Teaching Social Studies. 3 September 2008

     

     

    http://www.proteacher.org/c/185_Teaching_Social_Studies.html.

     

     

     

     

     

    Lesson 1: A Good Citizen Follows Rules

     

    Content Expectations:

     

     

    1 - C1.0.1: Identify some reasons for rules in school (e.g., provide order, predictability, andsafety).

     

    1 - C5.0.2: Identify situations in which people act as good citizens in the school community(e.g., thoughtful and effective participation in the school decisions, respect for the rights of others, respect for rule of law, voting, volunteering, compassion, courage, honesty).

    W.GN.01.03: Write an informational piece that addresses a focus question (e.g., What is a family?) using descriptive, enumerative, or sequence patterns that may include headings, titles, labels, photographs, or illustrations to enhance the understanding of central ideas. (English Language Arts).

    Key Concepts:  citizen, rules
     

    Abstract:This lesson begins with an explanation of the term ‘citizen.’ Next, the teacher shows students a large web on chart paper with the following phrase in the center circle:A Good Citizen…” with 6 circles connected. The teacher explains that the class will be adding ideas to the  web as they complete each lesson in the unit. The teacher  distributes a small 7-page booklet. Students label the title page, “What is a Good Citizen?”The teacher explains that they will becreating a book about good citizens. Returning to the web, the teacher writes the phrase “follows rules” in one of the outer circles. The teacher then poses the following question: Why is it important to follow school rules? In a Turn-and –Talk activity, students brainstorm answers to the question with a partner and then share with the whole group. The teacher then reads the book Know and Follow Rules or a similar book, to the class. As the book is read, the class creates a list on chart paper of reasons the book gives for school rules including; rules help us learn, rules help peopleshow respect, rules remind people to be polite, rules help make things fair for everyone, etc. The teacher then asks students to turn to the first page of their booklet and write ‘A good citizen follows rules.’ on the lines provided. Students then create an illustration of a good citizen following a rule.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     
    Lesson 2:  A Good Citizen Respects Authority

     

    Content Expectations:
     
    1 - C1.0.2: Give examples of the use of power with authority in school (e.g., principal, teacher orbus driver enforcing school rules).
     
    1 - C1.0.3: Give examples of the use of power without authority in school (e.g., types of bullying,taking cuts in line).

    1 - C5.0.2: Identify situations in which people act as good citizens in the school community (e.g.,thoughtful and effective participation in the school decisions, respect for the rights ofothers, respect for rule of law, voting, volunteering, compassion, courage, honesty).

    W.GN.01.03: Write an informational piece that addresses a focus question (e.g., What is afamily?) using descriptive, enumerative, or sequence patterns that may includeheadings, titles, labels, photographs, or illustrations to enhance the understanding ofcentral ideas. (English Language Arts)

     

     

     

    Key Concepts:  authority, bullying,  power

     

    Abstract:  In this lesson students explore the civics concepts of power and authority by connecting to the importance of rules as well as discussing the issue of bulliesand bullying. The lesson begins with the teacher posing the following question: “Whose job is it to see that students in a school follow the rules?” The teacher creates a list of student responses that includes people such as the principal, teachers, bus drivers, etc. The teacher then explains the term ‘power’ and writes it next to the list of people and poses the following question: “Do these people have any power in the school?” As students share ideas the teacher guides them in understanding that the people listed have the power to enforce school rules and to give out consequences to those who do not follow the rules. Next, the teacher writes the term ‘authority’ next to the word ‘power’ and explains that the people on the list have the authority, or right, to use their power in the school. The teacher guides students in discussing why it is important to respect authority in a school. Returning to the web from Lesson 1 the teacher writes “respects authority’ in one of the empty circles. Next, the teacher asks students to turn to page 2 in their booklet and write the following sentence on the lines provided: A good citizen respects authority. Students then illustrate this page of their booklet. The teacher shares King of the Playground, or The Recess Queen or a similar book describing the actions of a bully. Before reading, the teacher asks students what they think a bully is. As the book is read, the teacher points out examples of the bullying. For example, the bully prevents another child from using the swings or playing in the sandbox or similar incidents. The teacher explains that the bully used power at school just like a principal or teacher uses power. Then, the teacher poses the following question: “Did the bully have the right, or the authority, to use power against others?” Following a brief discussion the teacher creates a simple graphic organizer illustrated with stick figures and the following labels: PRINCIPAL: Uses Power With Authority – BULLY: Uses Power Without Authority. Finally, the class returns to the book and discusses possible reasons children become bullies as illustrated in the book and strategies for children to use when dealing with bullies.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Lesson 3:  A Good Citizen is Fair

     

    Content Expectations:
    1 - C2.0.1: Explain how decisions can be made or how conflicts might be resolved in fair and just ways (e.g., majority rules).
     
    1 - C5.0.2: Identify situations in which people act as good citizens in the school community (e.g., thoughtful and effective participation in the school decisions, respect for the rights of others, respect for rule of law, voting, volunteering, compassion, courage, honesty).

    W.GN.01.03: Write an informational piece that addresses a focus question (e.g., What is afamily?) using descriptive, enumerative, or sequence patterns that may includeheadings, titles, labels, photographs, or illustrations to enhance the understanding ofcentral ideas. (English Language)

     

    Key Concepts:  fairness, conflict

     

    Abstract: This lesson begins with the teacher asking students how they would feel if all recess was taken away. As the issue of fairness comes up, the teacher writes the term ‘fairness’ on aboard or overhead and explains the meaning of the term. The teacher then reads students a book about fairness such as Being Fair or Kids Talk About Fairness or a similar informational text and guides students in deepening their understanding of fairness. Finally, students’ roles play a playground conflict. The teacher asks students to work with a partner to come up with a fair way to resolve the conflict. Partners then share their ideas in the large group. Students vote on the solution they think will work best. Students again role play the conflict and act out the chosen solution. The teacher returns to the web they have been creating and writes “is fair” in one of the empty circles. As a summary activity, students are asked to turn to page 3 in the booklet they have been creating and add the following sentence on the lines provided: A good citizen is fair, and illustrate the page.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Lesson 4:   A Good Citizen is Responsible

     

    Content Expectations:

     

     

    1 - C5.0.1: Describe some responsibilities people have at home and at school (e.g., taking careof oneself, respect for the rights of others, following rules, getting along with others).

     

    1 - C5.0.2: Identify situations in which people act as good citizens in the school community (e.g.,thoughtful and effective participation in the school decisions, respect for the rights of others, respect for rule of law, voting, volunteering, compassion, courage, honesty).

    W.GN.01.03: Write an informational piece that addresses a focus question (e.g., What is afamily?) using descriptive, enumerative, or sequence patterns that may include headings, titles, labels, photographs, or illustrations to enhance the understanding ofcentral ideas. (English Language Arts)

    Key Concepts:  responsibility

     

    Abstract: This lesson begins with a review of family responsibilities, a concept that from Unit One.The teacher creates a three-column chart labeled: Classroom Responsibilities, School Responsibilities, and Playground Responsibilities. In a class discussion, students are asked toidentify examples of responsibilities for each of the columns. If time permits a book such as Being Responsible is then shared with the class. The teacher then returns to the web the class has beencreating and writes in one of the empty circles: is responsible. Finally, students return to the bookthey have been creating and write the following sentence on the next available page: A good citizen is responsible. Using ideas from the 3-column chart students illustrate this sentence. 

     

    Lesson 5:  A Good Citizen Helps to Resolve School Issues

     

    Content Expectations:

     

    1 - P3.1.1: Identify public issues in the school community.

     

     

    1 - P3.1.2: Use graphic data to analyze information about a public issue in the school community.

     

    1 - P3.1.3: Identify alternative resolutions to a public issue in the school community.

     

    1 - P3.3.1: Express a position on a public policy issue in the school community and justify theposition with a reasoned argument.

    1 - P4.2.1: Develop and implement an action plan to address or inform others about a public issue.

    1 - P4.2.2: Participate in projects to help or inform others.

     

    W.GN.01.03: Write an informational piece that addresses a focus question (e.g., What is a family?) using descriptive, enumerative, or sequence patterns that may include headings, titles, labels, photographs, or illustrations to enhance the understanding of central ideas. (English Language Arts).

     

    D.RE.01.01: Collect and organize data to use in pictographs. (Math).

     

    D.RE.01.02: and interpret pictographs. (Math).

     

    D.RE.01.03: Make pictographs of given data using both horizontal and vertical form of graphs; scale should be in units of one and include symbolic representations, e.g.,  :) represents one child.  (Math)

     

     

    Key Concepts: public issues

     

    Abstract:  In this lesson students explore how good citizens help to resolve school issues. The lesson begins with the teacher reminding students about the story shared in lesson 2, King of the Playground or a similar bullying book. The teacher asks how many of you know a bully and supplies several examples of bullying behavior in the school community to prompt them. The student answers are made into a simple bar graph or pictograph. The teacher guides student in looking at the data chart and asks are bullies a problem in our school? (If students and the data reveal that it is not a problem, explain that for many schools it is an issue or problem.) The teacher explains to students that good citizens solve problems. In small groups, students are asked to solve a bullying problem and discuss and brainstorm ways to deal with bullies. Each group shares a solution that is captured on a chart labeled “Bully Problem Solutions” The teacher explains that good citizens must communicate their ideas to solve problems and asks students how we could share our solutions with the rest of the school. The teacher guides the discussion to include presentations, announcements, and posters. In small groups, students choose a solution they think is the best and give a reason why they think so. Groups can create posters, announcements or presentation others that communicate their position on the issue of bullying and explains their chosen resolution. The teacher then returns to the web and writes the following in an empty circle:“helps solve problems.” Students then return to their booklet and write and illustrate the following sentence on the next available page: A good citizen helps solve problems.

     

     

     

     

    Lesson 6:  A Good Ctizen Honors the United States of America

     

    Content Expectations: 

     

    1 - C2.0.2: Identify important symbols of the United States of America (e.g., Statue of Liberty,Uncle Sam, White House, Bald Eagle).

    W.GN.01.03: Write an informational piece that addresses a focus question (e.g., What is a family?) using descriptive, enumerative, or sequence patterns that may include headings, titles, labels, photographs, or illustrations to enhance the understanding of central ideas. (English Language Arts)

     

    Key Concepts: country, patriotism, symbols, United States of America

     

    Abstract: In this lesson students expand their understanding of citizenship as they explore the concept of patriotism and important national symbols. The lesson begins with the teacherdisplaying an American flag and asking students what is this and why is it important. Next, the teacher reviews the concept of country and reminds students that our country is called the United States of America. The teacher then explains that it is important that students be good citizens of their school, and good citizens on their country. The teacher further explains that one way to be a good citizen is to honor the United States and respect its symbols such as the flag. The teacher explains this is called patriotism. Then, using one of the books from a series such as the Welcome Books American Symbols Series, the class recognizes two additional national symbols such as the Statue of Liberty, the Bald Eagle or the White House and understands their importance. The teacher then returns to the web and writes the following in the final circle: honors the United States. Students then complete their citizen booklet by writing and illustrating the following sentence on the last page: A good citizen honors the United States. As a homework assignment, students are to read their books to another person.

     

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Last Modified on 1/20/2009 2:08:44 PM

     

Last Modified on October 2, 2018