• Unit 2: How Do We Get What We Need or Want? 

     

     

    Overarching Question:

    How do families meet their wants and needs where they live? 

     

    Previous Unit:
     

     What is a family?

     

     

     

    This Unit:
     

    How Do We Get What We Want and Need? 

    Next Unit:
     
    How Do We Learn
    About Places?

      

    Big Picture Graphic

     

    Questions to Focus Assessment and Instruction:
    1. How do families satisfy their needs and wants?
    2. What is scarcity and what does it force families to do?
    3. How and why do families trade?
     

    Types of Thinking:

     Cause and Effect
     Compare and Contrast
     Descriptive

     

     

     

     

    Unit Abstract: Building on economic concepts from kindergarten, the unit begins with an exploration of economic wants and how people fulfill their wants with goods and services. Next, students are introduced to the terms ‘producer’ and ‘consumer’ as they explore ways in which their families consume goods and services. Students apply what they have learned in an activity based on Little Nino’s Pizzeria or a similar book. Students explore the concept of scarcity through a simple classroom demonstration and discussion of the book Bunny Money or a similar book. Students explore how scarcity forces people to make choices. This unit integrates math expectations using data, pictographs, and money. Using the book Crow & Pig or a similar book, students explore the concept of trade and then investigate how money simplifies trade. Students next look at various ways people earn money. Finally, students summarize the unit concepts in a graphic organizer. 

     

    Lesson Sequence:
     
    Lesson 1: Needs and Wants
    Lesson 2: Producers and Consumers
    Lesson 3: Scarcity
    Lesson 4: Choice
    Lesson 5: Money
    Lesson 6: Trade
     
    I Can Statements:
     
    I can describe my economic wants.
     
    I can describe goods and services and how my family uses them.
     
    I can explain what a producer and a consumer is.
     
    I can explain why I can't have everything I want.
     
    I can explain how money and trade are used to get what I need or want.

     

     

     

    Resources:
    Equipment/manipulative
    Art Paper and drawing materials such as Markers and Crayons
    Bunny Money
    Chart Paper and Markers
    Overhead Projector of Document Camara and Projector
    Play Money
     
    Student Resources:
     
    Barbour, Karen. Little Nino’s Pizzeria. New York: Voyager Books, 1990.
     

    Brisson, Pat. Benny’ Pennies. New York: Knopf Books for Young Readers, 1995.
     

    Chorao, Kay.Pig and Crow. New York: Owlet Paperbacks, 2005.
     

    Hughes, Sarah. My Aunt Works in a Cheese Shop (My Family at Work series) .New York:

    Children’s Press, 2000.

     

    My Dad Works on a Farm. (My Family at Work series). New York: Children’s Press, 2000.

    - - -.

    My Grandfather Works in a Bakery. (My Family at Work series). New York: Children’s Press,2000.

    - - -.

    My Mom is a Beekeeper (My Family at Work series). New York: Children’s Press, 2000.

    - - -.

    My Uncle Owns a Deli. (My Family at Work series). New York: Children’s Press, 2000.
     

    Numeroff, Laura. If You Take A Mouse to School. New York: Harper Collins, 2002.
     

    Sadler, Marilyn. Money, Money, Honey Bunny! New York: Random House Books for Young

    Readers, 2006. (rhyming words)
     
    Wells, Rosemary. Bunny Money. New York: Puffin, 2000.
     

    Wells, Rosemary. Bunny Money Reproducibles. 26 August 2008
     
    Goods and Services by Adil and Janeen R.,  Capstone Press 2006
     
    Let's Trade: A Bartering Book by Nancy Loewen and Brian Jensen ,  Picture Window Books 2005.
     
    Needs and Wants by Olson and Gillia M. ,  Capstone Press 2008
     
    One Fine Trade by Bobbi Miller,  Holiday House  2009
     
    Let's Trade: All About Trading by Kirstin Hall, Children's Press  2005
     
    Let's Trade by Harriet Ziefert   Puffin 1996
     

    Teacher Resources:
     
    Channell, Geanie, et. Al. Focus: Grades K-2 Economics. National Council on Economic Education,2007.
     

    Econ and Me Video

    Channell, Geanie, et. Al. Focus: Grades K-2 Economics. National Council on Economic Education,2007.
     

    Econ and Me Video Series and Teachers’ Guide.

    National Council on Economic Education. 1995.
     

     

    Lesson 1: Needs and Wants
     
    Lesson 1 Supplemental Materials:
     
     

     

    Content Expectations:

    K - E1.0.1:      Describe economic wants they have experienced.

     

    K - E1.0.2:      Distinguish between goods and services.

     

    Key Concepts:  economic wants, goods, services

     

    Abstract:  The lesson begins by reviewing how families provide safety and love, and help meet people’s needs and wants.  Using a T-Chart labeled “Wants” and “Needs”, the teacher guides students in identifying examples of some of their needs and wants and different ways these can be satisfied.  The teacher explains that needs and wants can usually be satisfied with a good or service.  Students distinguish between goods and services using various photographs and examples and classify various items as goods or services.  Finally, the students listen to the book, If You Take a Mouse to School and create a list of all the wants the mouse had in the story.  Students then connect these wants to the various goods and services that satisfy the mouse’s wants.

     

     

    Lesson 2:     Producers and Consumers
     
    Lesson 2 Supplemental Materials:
     

     

    Content Expectations:

    1 - E1.0.1:      Distinguish between producers and consumers of goods and services.

     

    1 - E1.0.2:      Describe ways in which families consume goods and use services.

     

    R.NT.01.03:   Identify problem/solution, sequence of events, and sense of story (beginning,

    middle, and end).

     

    Key Concepts:  consumer, goods, producer, services

     

    Abstract:  The teacher begins this lesson by reviewing economic concepts from the previous lesson. Students explore the term "consumer" in relation to the goods they have purchased.  Next, students are introduced to the term "producer", defined as "the provider of goods and services."  The teacher explains that people can be both producers and consumers.  Using the book Little Nino’s Pizzeria or a similar book about a family-owned business, students apply their economic knowledge from the first two lessons. The book is used to foster a discussion of many economic ideas:  how a family works together to run a business; how the family produces pizza, which is a good, and provides delivery service, which is a service; consumers loved the Nino’s pizza so business increased.  The book also demonstrates problem solving.

     

     

     

     

    Lesson 3:  Scarcity
     
    Lesson 3 Supplemental Materials:
     
     

     

    Content Expectations:

    1 - E1.0.3:      Using examples, explain why people cannot have everything they want (scarcity) and describe how people respond (choice).

     

    R.NT.01.03:   Identify problem/solution, sequence of events, and sense of story (beginning,

    middle, and end). (English Language Arts)

     

    Key Concepts:  scarcity

     

    Abstract:  This lesson begins with the students experiencing a scarcity situation in the classroom.  Scarcity is defined simply as not being able to have everything we want.  Students then listen to a scenario involving scarcity within a particular family. Student’s identify the problem of scarcity and brainstorm solutions for the family in the story.  Building on the concept of scarcity, the teacher guides students in understanding that because of scarcity, people must make choices.

     

    Lesson 4:  Choice
     
    Lesson 4 Supplemental Materials:
     

     

    Content Expectations:

    1 - E1.0.3:      Using examples, explain why people cannot have everything they want (scarcity) and describe how people respond (choice).

     

    D.RE.01.01: Collect and organize data to use in pictographs. (Math)

     

    D.RE.01.03: Make pictographs of given data using both horizontal and vertical forms of graphs;

    scale should be in units of one and include symbolic representations(e.g., J represents one child). (Math)

     

    M.UN.01.04: Identify the different denominations of coins and bills. (Math)

     

    M.UN.01.06: Calculate the amount of money: in cents up to $1, in dollars up to $100. Use the symbols $ and ¢. (Math)

     

    Key Concepts:  choice, pictograph, scarcity

     

    Abstract:  Students further explore the concept of scarcity and how scarcity forces people to make choices.  Students listen to the book The Doorbell Rang or a similar book.  As the book is read, students identify examples of scarcity and choice in the book. Next, given a scenario, students must make a choice about how to use their scarce time.  A connection to math is made when student choices are used as data to create pictographs.

     

    Lesson 5:  Trade
     
    Lesson 5 Supplemental Materials:
     

     

    Content Expectations:

    1 - E1.0.4:      Describe reasons why people voluntarily trade.

     

    1 - E1.0.6:      Describe how money simplifies trade.

     

    M.UN.01.04   Identify the different denominations of coins and bills. (Math)

     

    M.UN.01.06   Tell the amount of money: in cents up to $1, in dollars up to $100.  Use the symbols $ and ¢. (Math)

     

    Key Concepts:  money, trade

     

    Abstract:  This lesson begins with students listening to the book Pig and Crow, or a similar book relating to the concept of trade.  While listening, students identify the various trades made in the book.  As each trade is made, students consider the following questions: How did Crow get the good he wanted?  Why did Pig agree to trade?  The answers to these questions help students understand that people trade because both sides benefit from the trade.  Students then identify the benefits of each trade described in the story.  Students examine personal trades in which they have been involved, and ones where their trade involved money.  Next, students listen to a scenario in which a family is buying groceries at the store, identifying what the family trades for its purchase. Students learn that money was created to provide something of common value when people trade for many items such as groceries.  Money simplifies trade.  In connection to math, students identify different denominations of coins and bills and the value of each group.
     

    Lesson 6:  Money
     
    Lesson 6 Supplemental Materials:
     

     

    Content Expectations:

    1 - E1.0.5:      Describe ways in which people earn money (e.g., providing goods and services to others, jobs).

     

    1 - E1.0.6:      Describe how money simplifies trade.

     

    R.WS.01.04:   Use structural cues to recognize one-syllable words, blends, and consonant

    digraphs including: letter-sound, onset and rhymes, whole word chunks, word families, digraphs th, ch, sh. (English Language Arts)

     

    Key Concepts: money, trade

     

    Abstract:  This lesson begins with students listening to the book Money, Money, Honey Bunny! or a similar book.  Students consider the following question: “How do families get the money they use to buy goods and services?”  Students then brainstorm different jobs people have.  In small groups, students read one of the books from the My Family at Work series.  As they read, they will identify goods, services, consumers, and producers shown in the book they are given. .Each group shares its information with the class.  Finally, students complete a graphic organizer tying all the economic concepts of the unit together.

     

     
    Last Modified on 1/20/2009 2:08:44 PM

     

Last Modified on February 14, 2018