• What is a Family?

     

     

    Overarching Question:

     

     Why are families and schools important?

     

    Previous Unit:
     

    Kindergarten 

    Myself and Others 

     

     

    This Unit:
     
    What Is a Family?
    Next Unit:
     
    How Do We Get What We
    Need or Want?

     

     

     

    Big Picture Graphic

     

     

      

     

    Questions to Focus Assessment and Instruction: 
     
       1. What is a family? 
       2. How are families alike and different?
       3. How is a school like a family?
     
     
     
     
     
     
     
                                                                                            
    Types of Thinking:
     

     Compare and Contrast

     

     

     

     

     

     

    Unit Abstract (may include Historical Overview): In this integrated, foundational unit students begin an important transition as they expand from focusing on themselves to focusing on the social units of family and school.  The unit introduces many important concepts such as rules, responsibilities, basic needs, wants, change and diversity. The unit begins with an activity in which students share information about themselves. Using the book When I Was Five, students compare the past and present and identify examples of how they have changed from kindergarten to first grade. Students compare family characteristics based on their own family and those in several books such as: Little Mama Forgets, Daddy Makes the Best Spaghetti and Jonathan and His Mommy.  Students explore how family rules and responsibilities ensure families live and work together safely and effectively.  Using family photos and informational text such as Families or Families are Different Big Book, students identify how families are alike and different.  Finally, students explore similarities and differences between school and family.

     

       

    Focus Questions:

    1. What is a family?

    2. How are families alike and different?

    3. How is a school like a family?

     

     

    Content Expectations:
     
    K - E1.0.1: Describe economic wants they have experienced.
     

     

    1 - H2.0.1: Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among past, present, and future using family or school events.

     

     

    1 - G4.0.1: Use components of culture (e.g., foods, language, religion, traditions) to describe diversity in family life.

     

     

     

    1 - C1.0.1: Identify some reasons for rules in school (e.g., provide order, predictability, and safety).

     

    1 - C5.0.1: Describe some responsibilities people have at home and at school (e.g., taking care of oneself, respect for the rights of others, following rules, getting along with others).
     
    1 - E1.0.2: Describe ways in which families consume goods and services.
     

     

    Integrated GLCE’s:
     
    R.CM.01.01: Make text-to-self and text-to-text connections and comparisons by activating prior knowledge and connecting personal knowledge and experience to ideas in text through oral and written responses. (English Language Arts)
     

     

    R.NT.01.02: Identify and describe the basic form and purpose of a variety of narrative genre including realistic fiction, fantasy, and folktales. (English Language Arts)

    R.NT.01.05: Respond to individual and multiple texts by finding evidence, discussing, illustrating, and/or writing to reflect, make connections, take a position, and/or show understanding. (English Language Arts)

     

    Key Concepts:

    alike

    basic needs

    change

    different

    diversity

    economic wants

    family

    past

    present

    responsibility

    rules

    school 
     
    I Can Statements:
     
    I can describe how I have changed since kindergarten.
     
    I can describe my basic needs.
     
    I can describe my responsibilities at home and at school.
     
    I can compare and contrast my home to my school.

     

    Student Resources:

     

    Equipment/Manipulative

    Art Paper and Drawing Materials Such as Markers and Crayons

    Chart Paper and Markers

    Overhead Projector or Document Camera and Projector

    Student Resources

    Cruise, Robin. Little Mama Forgets. New York: Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 2006.

     

    Hines, Anna Grossnickle. Daddy Makes the Best Spaghetti. New York: Clarion Books, 1988.

     

    Howard, Arthur. When I Was Five. New York: Voyager Books, 1998.

     

     

    Kuklin, Susan. How My Family Lives in America. New York: Aladdin Picture Books, 1998.

     

    Morris, Ann. Families. New York: Harper Collins, 2000.

     

    Smalls, Irene. Families by Susan Kuklin,  Hyperion Books 2006

    All Families Are Different  by Norma Simon,  Albert Whitman & Co. 2003
     
    All Families Are Different by Sol Gordon, Tricycle Press  2004
     
    What Are Parents?  by Kyme Fox-Lee,  Storytyme Publishers  2005
     
    Jonathan and His Mommy. New York: Little, Brown Young Readers, 1994.

     

    Teacher Resources

    Books For Teaching About Families. 26 August 2008

     

    Families Poster Pack. Carson, California: Lakeshore Learning Materials, 2000.

     

     

    Families Thematic Unit E- Book. Teacher Created Resources, 26 August 2008

     

    http://www.buyteachercreated.com/estore/product/2110.

     

    Hoberman, Mary Ann. Fathers, Mothers, Sisters, Brothers: A Collection of Family Poems. New York: Scholastic, 1991.

    Pellegrini, Nina. Families are Different: Big Book and Teaching Guide. New York: Scholastic, 1992.

     

     

    Resources for Further Professional Knowledge

    First Grade Social Studies Websites. 26 August 2008

     

    Strategies for Teaching Social Studies. 26 August 2008

     

    http://www.udel.edu/dssep/strategies.htm.

     

     

    Teaching Social Studies. 26 August 2008

     

     
    Discovery Education Streaming (discoveryeducation.com):
     
    Beginning Social Studies Vocabulary (13 min.)
     
    Basic Needs (1 min.)
     
    Different Kinds of Shelters (3 min.)
     
    Water (4 min.)
     
    Wants and Needs (1 min.)
     
    Everybody Needs Food (19 min.)
     
    From Farm To Table: Milk (12 min.)
     
    From Farm To Table: Bread (16 min.)
     
    Cheese Factory,Eggs, (each 1 min.)
     
    Japan Fish Market (1 min.)
     
    What is a Farm ? (3 min.)
     
    Farmer's Market in Hilo, Hawaii: (1 min.)
     
    Everybody Needs Clothing (18 min.)
     
    Cotton Mill (1 min.)
     
    Wool (1 min.)
     
    Natural Resources for Clothing (5 min.)
     
    People Work to Earn Money (4 min.)
     
    Income (2 min.)
     
    Products that Workers Make (4 min.)
     
    Homes are Products (2 min.)
     
    Workers and Jobs (3 min.)
     
    Producers (3 min.)
     
    Consumers (2 min.)
     
    Saving Money (3 min.)
     
    People in Different Cultures Have Lots in Common (3 min.)
     
    Exploring the Diversity of Life:  Forest School  ( 10 min.)
     
    Diversity Elementary:  Appearance  ( 10 min.)
     
    Maps: Where  Am I ? (11 min.)
     
    Desert Landforms ( 3 min.)
     
    Valleys, Lakes, Hills, Plains ( 1 min. each)
     
    Animated Hero Classics:  Harriet Tubman  (28 min.)
     
    Harriet Tubman Rides the Underground Railway ( 3 min.)
     
    People of the Long House:  The Iroquois  ( 6 min.)
     
    Martin's Big Words:  The Life of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. ( 8 min.)
     

     

     

     

    Lesson 1:  All About Me!

     

    Lesson 1 Supplemental Materials:

     

    http://scope.oakland.k12.mi.us/docs/SS/SS010100/SS01010101_Supplemental_Materials.doc

     

    Content Expectations 

    1 – H2.0.1      Demonstrate chronological thinking by distinguishing among past, present, and future and family or school events. 

    1 – G1.0.3     Use personal directions (left, right, front, back) to describe the relative location of

                          significant places in the school environment.

    1 – G4.0.1      Use components of culture (e.g., foods, language, religion, traditions) to describe

                            diversity in family life.

     

    Integrated GLCE’s

    R.CM.01.01   Make text-to-self and text-to-text connections and comparisons by activating prior knowledge and connecting personal knowledge and experience to ideas in text through oral and written responses.  (English Language Arts)

     

    R.NT.01.02   Identify and describe the basic form and purpose of a variety of narrative genre including realistic fiction, fantasy, and folktales. (English Language Arts)

     

    Key Concepts: change, future, past, present

     

    Abstract:  This first lesson serves as an introduction to Unit 1: What Is a Family?  Students listen to the teacher read the book and discuss ways the boy in the story, as well as themselves, have changed over time. Students then consider the question, “What do you want to be when you grow up?”  They listen to and discuss the book, We Are All Alike...We Are All Different.  Concepts of physical differences, families, homes, foods, and interests are addressed.  With teacher assistance, students fill in an “All About Me” web and share them with the class.  The students begin individual picture dictionaries for the words and add to it throughout the year.

     

     

    Lesson 2:  What is a Family?

     
    Lesson 2 Supplemental Materials:
     
     
    Content Expectations:
     

    K - E1.0.1       Describe economic wants they have experienced

    This lesson serves as a foundational lesson that helps to set the context of 1st grade, and builds

    background knowledge for the remainder of the year.

     

    Integrated GLCE’s

    R.CM.01.01   Make text-to-self and text-to-text connections and comparisons by activating prior knowledge and connecting personal knowledge and experience to ideas in text through oral and written responses. (English Language Arts)

     

    R.NT.01.02   Identify and describe the basic forms and purposes of a variety of narrative genre including realistic fiction, fantasy, and folktales. (English Language Arts)

     

    R.NT.01.05   respond to individual and multiple texts by finding evidence, discussing, illustrating, and/or writing to reflect, make connections, take a position, and/or show understanding. (English Language Arts)

     

    Key Concepts:  basic needs, economic wants, family

     

    Abstract:  In this lesson students explore characteristics and purposes of families through literature and their own experiences.  The lesson begins with the teacher guiding students in developing a class definition of family such as “a family is a group of people who live together and take care of each other.”  Using two diverse stories about families such as Little Mamá Forgets, Daddy Makes the Best Spaghetti, or Jonathan and his Mommy, students collect information about what families do. In doing so, students consider how families play together, work together, eat together, keep each other safe, take care of each other, and love each other.  Students are introduced to basic needs, things people need to live and explore how families help them meet their basic needs of food, shelter, clothing, and love.  Students expand the list sharing examples about their own families, creating their own books entitled “What My Family Does.”  In an optional activity, the students add pages to their social studies vocabulary notebooks.

     

     

    Lesson 3:  Working Together in a Family

     
    Lesson 3 Supplemental Materials:
     
     

    Content Expectations 

    1 – C5.0.1      Describe some responsibilities people have at home and at school (e.g., taking care of oneself, respect for the rights of others, following rules, getting along with others).

     

    Integrated GLCE’s

    R.CM.01.01   Make text-to-self and text-to-text connections and comparisons by activating prior knowledge and connecting personal knowledge and experience to ideas in text through oral and written responses. (English Language Arts)

     

    Key Concepts: family, responsibilities, rules

     

    Abstract:

    In this lesson students explore family rules and responsibilities.   The teacher shares a short scenario describing a chaotic morning in a family without rules and responsibilities.  Students consider why the family is having problems and the importance of rules and responsibility.  After suggesting rules and responsibilities that might help the family, students explore the rules and responsibilities they have in their own families. Students compile of class list of rules and responsibilities to further their understanding of these social studies concepts.

     

     

    Lesson 4:  How Are Families Alike and Different?
     
    Lesson 4 Supplemental Materials:
     
     

    Content Expectations 

    1 – G4.0.1      Use components of culture (e.g., foods, language, religion, traditions) to describe diversity in family life.

     

    Integrated GLCE’s

    R.CM.01.01   Make text-to-self and text-to-text connections and comparisons by activating prior knowledge and connecting personal knowledge and experience to ideas in text through oral and written responses. (English Language Arts)

     

    R.NT.01.02   Identify and describe the basic forms and purposes of a variety of narrative genre including realistic fiction, fantasy, and folktales. (English Language Arts)

     

    R.NT.01.05    respond to individual and multiple texts by finding evidence, discussing, illustrating,

                            and/or writing to reflect, make connections, take a position, and/or show

                            understanding. (English Language Arts)

     

    Key Concepts:  alike, different, diversity, family

     

    Abstract:  In this lesson, students explore the ways in which families can be alike and different. Students begin by comparing similarities and differences in the families of their classmates. They then read a book to examine ways in which families may differ such as size, family members, skin color, etc. Using literature, the concept of diversity is introduced as students examine cultural differences among three families in the story. Student then consider how families are similar.  The teacher guides students to an understanding that all families share cultural universals such as food, language, religion, and traditions although the type of food, language, religion or traditions may differ.
     

     

    Lesson 5:  How is a School Like a Family?
     
    Lesson 5 Supplemental Materials:
     

     

    Content Expectations:

    1 - C1.0.1       Identify some reasons for rules in school (e.g., provide order, predictability, and safety).

     

    1 - C5.0.1       Describe some responsibilities people have at home and at school (e.g., taking care of oneself, respect for the rights of others, following rules, getting along with others.)

     

    Key Concepts:  family, responsibilities, rules, school

     

    Abstract:  In this final lesson students apply what they have learned about families by identifying ways in which schools are like families.  The lesson begins with a video entitled “What Is a Family.”  Following the video, students discuss important points.  The teacher briefly reviews of all the charts created in the unit.  Then, students are placed in cooperative groups and given the challenge of coming up with a way in which a school is like a family by using “evidence” from one of the charts.  Students begin to understand that rules keep us safe at school and focus on responsibilities they have as a student in school.  Students then consider how families and schools are different. Students are introduced to a Venn diagram and learn how to use the graphic organizer to show similarities and differences between families and schools. 

     

     

     

    Last Modified on 1/20/2009 2:08:44 PM

     

     

Last Modified on October 2, 2018